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Foreword from the President

Foreword from the President

gcc2Buenas yan Hafa adai,

I am excited to welcome you back to the Guam Community College campus for Academic Year 2021-2022, a year for growth and progress as we set a path forward for our students, our campus and our island community. While GCC has been open for students to attend in-person classes since Spring 2021, we are now back to face-to-face instruction for most of our courses.

We look, with excitement, toward the first full academic year back on campus. Learning and growing takes a collective effort, collaboration, and discussion. There is no more nurturing an environment for this than the college campus. That is why GCC allowed students to attend classes on campus this past Spring semester. It is the reason we returned to on-campus classes starting in the Summer 2021 session.

Rest assured that your health and safety remain our primary concern. GCC has complied with Guam DPHSS and CDC guidance for the opening of campus, and passed inspections by both organizations. We also remind you that health and safety on campus are a collective responsibility. Please continue to follow all guidance and remain vigilant against a resurgence of COVID-19 in our community.

Guam Community College is a leader in career and technical workforce development, providing the highest quality, student-centered education and job training for Micronesia. The is more than a mission statement for the College. It is a call to action that drives our purpose and commitment to provide the education and training that translates into meaningful jobs and careers.

Through its mandate, GCC is uniquely positioned to lead our island in career and technical workforce development at a time when our community is starting to emerge from the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on our island. We remain committed to this mission to ensure that you have the knowledge and skills to thrive in the post-COVID economy.

Whatever your interests, you can count on GCC to help you progress toward your career goals. Every year we strive to offer more to our students, and to provide opportunities that reflect the demands of our community. This year is no different. We have established a system of support to ensure that your success at GCC is not hampered by a lack of access, through technology, to the resources you need to succeed.

Regardless of your current goals, by taking classes at GCC you are investing in yourself and in your ability to become economically sustainable and successful for the long term. Take advantage of the services GCC provides to help you along your postsecondary educational path. There is a good reason we say that “your success begins here.”
MYO Signature.jpg
Mary A. Y. Okada, Ed.D.
President
Guam Community College  

 

Message from the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Message from the Vice President for Academic Affairs

gcc1 Hafa Adai Students,

Welcome to the Guam Community College! Whether this is your first time here, or you are a continuing or a returning student, my hope is that you will have new experiences, meet new people and learn new things at GCC this year.

Our aim at GCC is to configure a conducive learning environment that melds classroom instruction with activities, events and student-led organizations that combine to provide a rich learning experience for you. We firmly place the health and safety of our students, employees and campus guests as our first and highest priority. We have taken the measures to ensure a safe learning environment, and as a result, we are confident that you will thrive at GCC as a result of our changes. GCC remains committed to our motto of Students First, Mission Always!

Our program offerings continue to evolve as the needs of our community change. In the wake of COVID-19, our community’s needs have shifted. Critical jobs now include many of the traditional skilled trades in such industries as construction, culinary and healthcare. GCC’s programs in these areas allow our students to go from classroom right into their chosen profession.

Last academic year, GCC launched our first ever four-year degree – a Bachelor of Science in Career and Technical Education or BS CTE, as well as the two-plus-two Computer Science degree program that requires all Computer Science degree students to complete their Associate’s Degree at the Guam Community College and then move to the University of Guam to complete their Bachelor’s Degree. We will continue to develop and expand programs like these so our students have the widest options possible to pursue their educational goals.

As you look through the programs outlined in our online catalog, I encourage you to take time to examine not only the courses required for each program, but also the student learning outcomes, or SLOs, outlined for each course. These SLOs are a guide to the knowledge, attitude and skills that will be acquired upon successful completion of each course. Think of the SLOs as the return on the investment you will make in yourself by attending GCC.


AVP E-signature Blue
Virginia C. Tudela, Ph. D.
Vice President for Academic Affairs
Guam Community College

General Information

Dates of Effect

The Guam Community College Catalog Academic Year (AY) 2021-2022 is in effect from 08/12/21 to 08/10/22. Any changes to catalog content during this time will be noted on addenda posted on the GCC website (www.guamcc.edu). 

History of the College

Guam Community College is a public postsecondary educational institution, created by Public Law 14-77 in 1977 (as amended by P.L. 31-99 in 2011) to strengthen and consolidate Career and Technical Education (CTE) on Guam. The College operates secondary and postsecondary CTE programs, adult and continuing education, community education, and short-term specialized training. These programs are delivered both on and off-campus, in satellite programs and on site at businesses as needed. The College also serves as the State Board of Control for career and technical education under the United States Vocational Education Act of 1946, 1963, and subsequent amendments.

The College offers over 50 fields of study, and prepares students for entry into the workforce, or transfer to four-year colleges and universities with advanced standing in professional and technical degree programs. The College offers a variety of community service and special programs to prepare students for college experiences, including adult education (English as a Second Language, Adult Basic Education, and Adult High School) and GED® high school equivalency exams. 
Guam Community College will be the premier educational institution for providing globally recognized educational and workforce development programs.

Mission Statement

Guam Community College is a leader in career and technical workforce development, providing the highest quality, student-centered education and job training for Micronesia (Board of Trustees Policy 100).

SinanganMisión (CHamoru translation):
Guiya i Kulehon Kumunidåt Guåhan, i mas takhilo’ mamanaguen fina’che’cho’ yan i teknikåt na kinahulo’ i manfáfache’cho’ ya u na’ guáguaha nu i manakhilo’ yan manmaolek na tiningo’ ni i manmafananågui yan i fina’na’guen cho’cho’ para Maikronesiha.
 
Diversity

We value an engaged, inclusive culture that embraces diverse points of view and collaboration to accomplish the College’s common goals.
 

Accountability

We value a culture of institutional and individual responsibility, transparency, and continuous assessment and improvement.
 

Service

We support and recognize service at all levels of the College. We strive to contribute to the benefit of the College, students, community, and our neighboring islands within Micronesia.
 

Integrity

We hold high standards of character and integrity as the foundation upon which the College is created.
 

Learning-Centered

We foster intellectual flexibility, knowledge, and skills by integrating teaching, assessment, and learning to promote continuous improvement of our programs and services to support our scholarly community.
 

Student-Focused

We are committed to education, inquiry and service in order to meet our students’ ever growing and changing needs. We promote lifelong learning, civic and social responsibility, leadership, and career growth.
Regional Accreditation

Guam Community College is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC), 10 Commercial Blvd., Suite 204, Novato, CA. 94949, phone (415) 506-0234, fax (414) 506-0238. ACCJC is an institutional accrediting body recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) and the U.S. Department of Education. Documents describing the accreditation of the College may be examined at the Vice President for Academic Affairs’ (VPAA) office, Bldg 2000, Suite 2234.
 

Program Accreditation

The Associate of Arts in Culinary Arts program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation Education Foundation's (ACFEF) Accrediting Commission, which is recognized by the Council of Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). Initial accreditation was granted on December 31, 2014. A reaffirmation of accreditation of the Culinary Arts program was granted on February 2, 2018 and will expire on December 31, 2022. Additionally, on October 2016, the College received notification that the World Association of Chefs' Societies (WACS) or Worldchefs awarded WACS Recognition of Quality Culinary Education to Guam Community College.

Facilities and Faculty

The College is located in Mangilao, Guam on a campus over 22-acres in size. Standard classroom facilities are housed in permanent concrete buildings. Metal buildings are used primarily for shop facilities in career and technical education.

Shop spaces are provided for Auto Mechanics, Auto Body, Construction Trades, Welding, and Air Conditioning and Refrigeration courses. Special laboratories are used for instruction in the Allied Health, Computer Science, Office Technology, Networking Systems Technology, Visual Communications, and the Culinary Arts programs.

The GCC faculty are qualified by their education and experience to offer courses and programs that achieve the educational objectives of the College. Faculty credentials are found at the back of this student catalog. Please refer to the GCC Fact Book for more detailed information on the College’s instructional facilities and faculty profile. Contact the Office of Assessment, Institutional Effectiveness, and Research (AIER) for a copy. AIER is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Services and Administration Building, Suites 2226 and 2227, with telephone numbers (671) 735-5520 and 735-5612.

GCC also serves secondary schools by offering Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs in the Guam Department of Education (GDOE) high schools. Presently, there are six (6) GDOE high schools located throughout the island where various CTE classes are taught by GCC faculty.


Catalog Contents Disclaimer

Guam Community College has made reasonable efforts to provide information that is accurate at the time of this catalog’s publication. However, the College reserves the right to make appropriate changes in procedures, policies, calendars, requirements, programs, courses and fees. When feasible, changes will be announced prior to their effective date.
 

Student Responsibility

It is the student’s responsibility to be familiar with the information presented in this publication and to know and observe all regulations and procedures relating to the program he or she is pursuing. In no case will a regulation be waived or an exception granted because a student pleads ignorance or contends that he or she was not informed of the regulations and procedures. Responsibility for following all policies and meeting all requirements and deadlines for degree and certificate programs rests with the student.

Copyright Policy

Guam Community College adheres to the provisions of the U.S. copyright law (Title 17, United States Code, Section 101, et sep.). Additional copyright information is available at the College Learning Resource Center.

Non-discrimination Statement

Guam Community College complies with all federal and territorial rules and regulations and prohibits discrimination on the basis of age, race, color, national origin, gender, sexual orientation or disability. This holds true for all students who are interested in participating in educational programs and/or extracurricular activities. Further information may be obtained in the GCC Student Handbook available online at www.guamcc.edu, or the Dean’s Office, School of Technology & Student Services in the Student Services & Administration Building, 2nd Floor, Suite 2229.

Student Code of Conduct

The Guam Community College has broad responsibilities for the education of the student and the College’s standards of behavior can be considered part of the educational process. Guam Community College expects that each student will obey federal and territorial laws as well as College regulations. Any act that interferes with the rights of others, disrupts or impairs the normal function of the College, damages or destroys property, or impairs health or safety is grounds for disciplinary action. Students who interfere with the personal liberty of others on campus are liable to expulsion and to such other penalties as may be imposed by law. 

Students are provided due process in disciplinary adjudication. Student conduct at all times should reveal mature judgment and a sense of moral, civic and academic responsibility. For a detailed explanation of GCC’s Student Rights and Responsibilities and the Student Code of Conduct, see the GCC Student Handbook or go online at www.guamcc.edu, click on Student Services and Student Handbook. Each GCC student is responsible for reading and understanding the GCC Student Handbook.

Academic Integrity

Academic integrity is fundamental to learning and is consistent with the Institutional Learning Outcomes (ILOs) espoused at Guam Community College. The concept of academic integrity lies at the very heart of any college, and learning and scholarship cannot thrive without this fundamental value. Therefore, academic dishonesty will not be tolerated. Students who commit such acts expose themselves to sanctions as severe as expulsion from the College.

Academic dishonesty can take different forms, including, but not limited to: cheating, plagiarism, and technology misuse and abuse. In any situation in which students are unsure of what constitutes academic dishonesty, it is the students’ responsibility to raise the question with their instructor. It is also the students’ responsibility to be familiar with the student guidelines on academic integrity.

Some common violations of these basic standards of academic integrity include, but are not limited to:

Cheating

Using or attempting to use unauthorized assistance, material, or study aids in examinations or other academic work, or preventing or attempting to prevent another from using authorized assistance, material, or study aids.
 

Plagiarism

Passing off someone else's work as his or her own. This can range from failing to cite an author for ideas in a student's paper to cutting and pasting paragraphs from different websites to handing in a paper downloaded from the internet.

All are considered plagiarism. Students who plagiarize are likely to be caught, and the consequences will be severe and will include anyone who enabled the plagiarism to take place. College policy will be implemented, regardless of the feelings of either the students or the instructor. Students found guilty of plagiarism will have this entered into their record and may be expelled from the College.
 

Fabrication

Submitting contrived or altered information in any academic exercise. Examples: making up data for an experiment; “fudging” data; citing nonexistent or irrelevant articles; presenting fraudulent excuses, lies, and letters of recommendations.
 

Multiple submissions

Submitting, without prior permission, any work submitted to fulfill another academic requirement. Example: submitting the same paper for two different classes without the expressed consent of both professors.
 

Misrepresentation or falsification of academic records

Misrepresenting or tampering with or attempting to tamper with any portion of a student’s transcripts or academic record, either before or after enrolling at Guam Community College.
 

Facilitating academic dishonesty

Knowingly helping or attempting to help another violate any provision of this code. Example: working together on a take-home exam or other individual assignment, discussing an exam with a student who has yet to take it, giving tests or papers to another student, etc.
 

Unfair advantage

Attempting to gain unauthorized advantage over fellow students in an academic exercise. Examples: gaining or providing unauthorized access to examination materials (either past or present); obstructing or interfering with another student’s efforts in an academic exercise; lying about a need for an extension for an exam or paper; continuing to write even when time is up during an exam; destroying, hiding, removing, or keeping library materials, etc.

Policy on Substance Abuse

Guam Community College endeavors to lead students and employees to higher ideals of character and public service. The College commits itself to the goals of developing the mind, clarity of thought, and to the development of the human spirit. Abuse of alcohol and other drugs is recognized as an impediment to these goals and as a threat to the College’s mission of education and training.

Workplace Violence Prevention Policy

Guam Community College is committed to providing a safe environment for students and employees. GCC can best perform its missions of teaching, training and public service when faculty, students, staff and visitors share a climate that supports a safe learning environment that is free from disruptive, threatening and violent behavior. Special Workplace Violence Policies and Procedures can be accessed in the GCC Student Handbook, at the office of the Associate Dean responsible for Student Services, Bldg. 2000, suite 2233 or at the Human Resources Office located in the Student Services & Administration Building 2000, suite 2212 or 2213.

Tobacco and Betel Nut (Pugu’a)- Free Policy

As a way to promote the health and welfare of the College campus community, the Board of Trustees established Board of Trustees Policy No. 175 that requires the Guam Community College premises to be Tobacco and Betel Nut (Pugu’a)-Free effective June 1, 2007.  The policy was further amended on May 30, 2013 to include electronic cigarettes. To comply with the Board of Trustees Policy No. 175 and Administrative Directive No. 2006-05, all employees and students are expected to adhere to the following:
  • Do not use tobacco products while on Guam Community College property. 
  • Do not use electronic cigarette (e-cigs) devices while on Guam Community College property.
  • Do not chew or spit pugu’a while on Guam Community College premises.
  • Assist with the enforcement of Board of Trustees Policy No. 175.

Violation of the Board of Trustees Policy and Administrative Directive will be addressed in accordance with the disciplinary actions outlined in the Personnel Rules & Regulations, the GCC Student Handbook, and the Board-Faculty Union Agreement, 2017-2023.

Sexual Harassment Prevention Policy

As required by the Higher Education Amendments of 1992, the College has a Sexual Harassment Prevention Policy to promote awareness of rape, acquaintance rape and other sex offenses and the procedures for reporting such offenses among all College constituents. More details regarding the Board of Trustees’ Policy 185 are available in the GCC Student Handbook, which is posted on the College’s website, www.guamcc.edu

Academic Calendar 2021-2022

Fall 2021
08/09/2021 Faculty Start Date
08/11/2021 First Day of Classes
09/06/2021 (Observed) Labor Day - Campus closed
09/10/2021 Last day to Withdraw - First 8 Week Courses
10/29/2022 Last day to Withdraw - Full Term Courses
11/02/2021 All Soul's Day - Campus closed
11/05/2021 Last day to Withdraw - Second 8 Week Courses
11/11/2021 Veteran's Day - Campus closed
11/25/2021-11/28/2021 Thanksgiving Break
12/02/2021 Last Day of Classes
12/07/2021 Grades Due
12/08/2021 Our Lady of Camarin Day - Campus closed
 
Spring 2022
01/03/2022 Faculty Start Date
01/05/2022 First Day of Classes
01/17/2022 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day - Campus closed
02/04/2022 Last day to Withdraw - First 8 Week Courses
03/07/2022 Guam History &CHamoru Heritage Day - Campus closed
03/11/2022 Last day to Withdraw - Full Term Courses
04/01/2022 Last day to Withdraw - Second 8 Week Courses
04/11/2022-04/17/2022 Spring Break
05/02/2022 Last Day of Classes
05/05/2022 Grades Due
05/13/2022 Commencement Exercise
05/30/2022 Memorial Day - Campus closed
 
Summer 2022
06/03/2022 Faculty Start Date & First Day of Classes
06/17/2022 Last Day to Withdraw
07/04/2022 Independence Day - Campus closed
07/15/2022 Last Day of Classes
07/21/2022 Liberation Day - Campus closed
07/20/2022 Grades Due

Student Support Services

Career Guidance and Counseling Services

A full range of counseling services is offered to students including orientation to college programs and services, college placement tests, career counseling, personal counseling and student rights advocacy. Counselors are available in the Student Services & Administration Building on a walk-in or appointment basis. Counseling services are also available online. Counselor hours are posted in the Student Services & Administration Building.

Pre-Enrollment Counseling

Students who have applied for admission or who are planning to enroll for the first time are encouraged to contact a counselor for educational and/or career and technical education guidance services. Students are provided with information regarding admissions procedures, placement testing requirements, instructional programs, and other services. Those who are undecided about career goals or objectives are provided with career guidance services, which may include assessment of interests and aptitudes and exploration of career fields.

Services for counseling will be accessed through various entry points on the GCC public website. Under the Admissions header or Student life header are the “Request for Counseling Services” link. Also, under the Student life header is the counseling main page where more information about services can be found.  

Announcements will be made on MyGCC to inform the college community of counseling services and how they may avail of the service. Counseling services will be provided either by face-to-face, phone call, or through a virtual meeting via ZOOM or Google Meet. If students prefer to communicate via email only, we will provide that option as well.  

English and Mathematics Placement Test

Effective October 2016, ACCUPLACER replaced COMPASS as the College’s placement test. Placement test results are valid for two (2) years. While placement testing is not mandatory for admission to the College, it is required for enrollment in English and Mathematics courses, which are required early in all programs. Students can schedule their test online after making payment by visiting www.guamcc.edu and clicking on Placement Test under the Admissions tab. The College reserves the right to require students to be re-evaluated using its placement test at any time.

Students can schedule their test online after making payment by visiting www.guamcc.edu and clicking on Placement Test under the Admissions tab. The College reserves the right to require students to be re-evaluated using its placement test at any time. Other means of placing students into Math and English courses are the CLYMER program and WorkKeys certification scores.

Under GCC's CLYMER (Classroom Learning Yields Math & English Readiness) program, a recent (within two years) GDOE or private high school graduate who has earned a minimum GPA of 3.2 and taken higher level math or senior English courses can enroll into college-level math and English courses without taking a placement exam. Learn more about CLYMER at www.guamcc.edu under Admissions.

Students who have taken the WorkKeys assessment test and earn gold or platinum certification may be accepted at GCC for placement into EN110 and MA110A within two years of receiving the certification. A student may use either or both placement methods. For example, if a student does not meet the CLYMER eligibility requirement for MA110A but scored a gold or platinum in WorkKeys, the student may use the WorkKeys certification to place into MA110A if the student chooses to do so.
 

Career Information and Guidance

Information, materials, and counselor assistance are available to students who need help in career educational planning and to learn about their interests, abilities, goals and values. Computer-assisted career search programs and information on schools and colleges that provide additional training for occupations are also available.

Personal/Social Counseling Services

Counselors provide personal growth and development counseling. Students experiencing adjustment problems, stress, anxiety, difficulties in relationships with others, or other symptoms of emotional distress may receive individual counseling on an appointment basis, or in some cases be referred to services in the community. College counselors are trained professionals, and all information related to the person receiving counseling is confidential and may be released only with the written permission of the student.

Student Rights Advocacy

The counseling staff is responsible for promoting the welfare of students and assisting them in the protection of their basic human rights. Counselors will, when requested, take an active role in advising students of their rights to privacy, freedom of expression and viewpoints, freedom of the press, and rights to due process. Counselors will assist in mediation of disputes and grievances and act as the advocate of the student. Related policies and procedures are found in the GCC Student Handbook.
Academic Advising at the College is a process that assists students in clarifying their life and career goals as they develop their educational plan. Since academic advising is also a decision-making process, the ongoing communication is the responsibility of both the student and his/her advisor.

Academic Advising goes beyond requirements and registration. It is an educational and career plan developed between the student and the advisor.

Guam Community College partners with its students to succeed. This is reflected in the following activities:
 
  • Assisting students in clarifying, articulating, and attaining academic and life goals;
  • Facilitating each student’s academic adjustment to the campus;
  • Educating students to assess academic progress and develop appropriate educational plans;
  • Explaining and clarifying graduation requirements and academic rules and regulations;
  • Serving as advocates and mediators for students; and
  • Referring students to appropriate departments or programs to meet student needs.

The student is expected to meet with his/her academic advisor regularly to plan an academic program and review achievement. Students may also work with their advisor remotely by receiving academic or career advisement via email, telephone, or Google Meet. Students may request for services by appointment to be scheduled through email and confirmed via Google Calendar invite. 

Advisor assignments are made in accordance with the student’s program of study and are intended to be continuous throughout the student’s college career. Additional information may be obtained from the Admissions and Registration Office, Student Services & Administration Building, 1st. floor.

Health Services

The Health Services Center is staffed by one full-time registered nurse and an administrative assistant. Students and employees of the College may utilize its services.

The services available at the Health Services Center are:
 
  • basic first aid for injuries and medical conditions that occur during school time;
  • assessment and nursing management of chronic health problems based on the client’s physician-prescribed therapeutic regimen;*
  • annual screening of employees for tuberculosis (TB) as required by law;
  • screening of students for TB in compliance with public law and school policy;
  • administration of TB skin test;
  • immunization program;*
  • immunization audit in compliance with public law and school policy;
  • Brief Tobacco Intervention program;
  • screening of height and weight, blood pressure, vision, and pediculosis;*
  • pregnancy testing and prenatal follow-up;*
  • advocacy for persons with disabilities;
  • referral services on health management; 
  • counseling on health and health-related issues;
  • healthpromotion/educationthroughclass ppresentations; and
  • STD and HIV testing and treatment in partnership with DPHSS.
*Services are rendered upon availability of staff and resources.


The health requirements for students include:
 
  • TB clearance within one (1) year prior to school registration. For any individual entering from an area other than the U.S. states or territories, Public Law 22-130 requires that a tuberculosis test must be conducted within 6 months prior to enrollment. Those with positive test results must obtain medical evaluation from their private medical clinic first and then proceed to the TB Section of the Department of Public Health & Social Services for clearance;
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) - Students must at least have one dose on or after their first birthday. Guam Immunization Protocol indicates that it is strongly recommended that individuals born in or after 1957 receive two doses of MMR, if they never had measles (physician-diagnosed), or if they do not have confirmed laboratory evidence of measles immunity. Those born prior to 1957 are exempted from the MMR requirement; Tetanus &Diptheria (TD) received within the last 10 years;
  • Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV) for students below 18 years of age
  • Emergency and Health Information form

Note: Students whose choice of study will place them at risk with the exposure to blood-borne pathogens are advised to follow further instructions by their respective program advisor regarding other health requirements such as hepatitis B vaccine and physical examination.
 
Student Parking
The College reserves the right to control parking and the flow of traffic on the campus. Accessible parking for students with disabilities is clearly marked and available in front of the Student Support Services, Building B, the North Parking Lot, by Building 500, and in front of the Student Services & Administration Building.  There is also accessible parking in front of Building E.  Improperly parked vehicles may be towed away at the owner’s expense. The College will not be responsible for any damage done to any vehicle parked on campus. The College does provide security services throughout the campus.

Food Service
Food service on campus is offered during the Fall and Spring semesters through local vendors Monday -Thursday 7:30a.m. – 8:00pm and Friday 7:30a.m. -5:00pm. The concessions are closed on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. For more information, visit the Materials Management Office, Bldg. 2000, suite 2104, 2105 or contact 735-5540/5542.

Bookstore
The Bookstore is located in the Foundation Building (Bldg. 6000, Rm. 6104.). The Bookstore is open Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and closed on weekends and holidays. You may contact the Bookstore at 735-6018 or via e-mail at bookstore@guamcc.edu. Special Bookstore hours are set during the registration period and posted online at MyGCC. 

Student I.D. Cards
Students are expected to have a GCC I.D. card on their possession at all times. All students are required to present an I.D. to access services at computer labs, library, Bookstore and Health Services Center, to name a few.
 

Center for Student Involvement

The Center for Student Involvement (CSI) oversees an array of student activities, such as New Student Orientation, Leadership Development, Service-Learning, Student Governance, and Student Organizations. Each of these initiatives is guided by the belief that students must become intentionally involved in campus programs and activities in order to become fully prepared for the workplace and for other life commitments as well. CSI assists students and student organizations in planning and implementing programs, activities and events, and plans and implements campus-wide programs to address the needs and interests of GCC’s students. It also ensures that student organizations and the Council on Postsecondary Student Affairs (COPSA) achieve success in all their extra-curricular activities. The CSI initiatives are also designed to foster in students a sense of voice, empowerment and responsibility to the campus community.

New Student Orientation

The New Student Orientation program introduces new students to the Guam Community College services, resources, and opportunities which will support their academic and career goals. Effective Fall 2019, Title IX training was included as part of the student orientation program.

Orientation for all new students may also be facilitated remotely via Zoom and Google Classroom. A live virtual orientation via Zoom will provide students an opportunity to engage with their peers and meet representatives from various GCC departments and offices. An overview of Google Classroom will also be covered during orientation. Students will be enrolled in an Orientation Google Classroom course where they will be able to access important information and documents, ask questions, and connect with their peers. For those students unable to attend the live virtual orientation via Zoom, a recording will be made available on Google Classroom.

Leadership Development

Leadership Development assists students in realizing their leadership potential. Involvement, training and development opportunities are offered at individual and organizational levels tailored to fit the unique leadership needs of interested students.

Student leadership development may also be held online via Zoom. Recordings of trainings, workshops, and conferences will be shared with students. Student Organization Officer and Advisor Training may be held online via Zoom.
 

Service-Learning

Service-Learning is a way of teaching and learning that engages all learners in hands-on academic projects in the community to meet learning objectives and strengthen communities. Students who are civically engaged in their learning are better able to connect classroom learning with real life situations through participation in community service projects.

Student Governance

The Council on Postsecondary Student Affairs (COPSA) is the official representative body for student governance. As the Student Senate, COPSA plans student activities, approves student organization budgets and ensures that the College fully considers the needs and interests of students in its decisions and offerings.

The Council on Postsecondary Student Affairs (COPSA) will meet regularly and meetings may be available online via Zoom and Google Meet. The Center for Student Involvement (CSI) may be able to work directly with the student leaders through video conferencing (Zoom and Google Meet), teleconferencing and email correspondence.  COPSA will hold General Membership meetings and Executive Committee meetings which may also be available online, via Zoom.  

Student Organizations

Student organizations provide excellent opportunities for students to develop personally and professionally. Student organizations will work in conjunction with the Council on Postsecondary Student Affairs (COPSA), in planning and implementing activities, events, and campus-wide programs to address the needs and interests of GCC students. Through active involvement in their campus community, students will expand their circle of influence, gain an understanding of diversity, be instilled with a sense of ownership over their educational experience, and create a greater commitment to making GCC and their community a better place.

The Center for Student Involvement (CSI) may be able to work with student organizations through video conferencing (Zoom and Google Meet), teleconferencing, and email correspondence. Student organization meetings may be made available through Google Meet.  

The Administrative Professionals Society (APS) builds office knowledge and expertise by providing valuable learning opportunities in technology, communication, and professional skills to meet the needs of the individual and the community.

The Adult High School Student Organization (AHSSO) represents all officially registered Adult High School students and serves as a voice to COPSA in submitting student issues, problems and concerns for the Adult High School students.

The American Association of University Women (AAUW) Student Chapter, GCC advances the equity for women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy and/or research.

The Association of Junior Accountants (AJA) fosters the growth of the accounting and finance communities in Guam Community College (GCC) and aids organizations associated with these communities.

The Collegiate DECA furthers the understanding and practice of the principles of marketing within the business community and generates revenue for scholarships for marketing students.

The Cosmetologists United Together (CUT) provides opportunities for students pursuing an Industry Certification in Cosmetology to engage in fellowship and creative self-expression.

The Culinary Arts Student Association (CASA) fosters Culinary Arts educational growth, cultural and social assimilation, ethnic appreciation and equal access to all college Culinary Arts programs and activities.

The Digital Arts Society (DAS) brings together students interested in the digital arts to assist in their growth and development, building their leadership skills through experiences in social, economic, educational and community activities relative to the field of visual communications.

The EcoWarriors raises awareness and educates the community on sustainability issues including recycling, energy management, and conservation of natural resources.

The Education Student Organization (ESO) serves to support students seeking a degree under the Education Department, including students studying Early Childhood Education, Education and Sign Language Interpreting.

The Fencing Club encourages, promotes, supervises, and develops the modern sport of fencing at GCC.

The Hospitality and Tourism Society (HOST) promotes tourism on campus, the community at large and other areas outside of Guam.

The Human Service Student Organization promotes the fields of Human Services and Social Sciences through the act of volunteerism and community service activities.

The Japan Club promotes the language and culture of Japan through a variety of activities to educate and entertain the campus community.

The Math Club promotes interest, understanding, and knowledge of the mathematical world throughout the college and the local community.

The Medical Assistant Student Organization (MASO) enables medical assisting students to enhance and demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and professionalism required by employers and patients.

The Pacific Islands Students Organization (PISO) provides support for newly enrolled students in their efforts to assimilate into the College and community environments.

The Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society (Beta Beta Xi Chapter) promotes scholarship, the development of leadership and service, and the cultivation of fellowship.

The Practical Nursing Student Association (PNSA) provides support and leadership opportunities to undergraduate nursing students throughout the nursing program.

The Science Club promotes interest, understanding, and knowledge of the scientific world throughout the college and the local community.

The Social Justice Society (SJS) facilitates networking and career building activities in order to create a more cohesive and professional student community.

The Society of Management Industry Leaders for Excellence (SMILE) supports all students seeking a business degree, teaches members how to be socially aware, and provides service to the community.

The Sports and Recreation Club (SPARC) furthers a common interest in physical activities through competition, instruction, participation, or performance.

The Talent Club increases student morale and school pride by showcasing student talent in various performing arts.

The Technology and Gaming Society (TaGS) promotes technology through the fun of gaming and provides an opportunity for Guam Community College students who are interested in video games and video game design to build community.

The Veterans Club provides a network of support among student veterans and promotes an understanding of student veteran issues.

The Visual Voices Club (ViVo) promotes the rich culture of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing community.

The Yapese Student Organization (YSO) promotes cultural diversity on campus and strives to preserve a common Yapese cultural identity.
 

Student Complaint Procedure

A complaint covers any concern or issue regarding employees (faculty, support staff, and administrators) or visitors on campus about a matter related to a student’s educational experience with GCC that is not academic in nature. Examples of non-academic concerns or issues could include: perceptions and/or allegations of discrimination based on color, age, sex (to include sexual harassment and sexual/gender orientation), national origin, race, religion, political affiliation or disability condition; other forms of harassment; disruptive, threatening, or violent behavior; conduct associated with drugs and/or alcohol; and violations of other College Board policies and/or administrative regulations/directives that do not have specified procedures in place.

The use of this procedure does not apply to student disciplinary actions outlined in the GCC Postsecondary Handbook and other issues, which are covered under separate Board policies and administrative regulations that have specific procedures in place. In the above instances, the Associate Dean responsible for overseeing Student Support Services (or designee), shall inform the student of the correct procedure to follow for the former and/or refer the student to the College official through whom the request should be addressed for the latter. Complaints against employees alleging forms of misconduct described in the GCC Code of Ethics (Policy 470) shall be referred to the Human Resources Administrator.

Whenever reasonably possible, a student who encounters a non-academic problem is encouraged to seek an informal resolution of the matter directly with the College employee or visitor. If the attempt to reach an informal resolution is not successful or if an informal resolution is not advisable, then the concern or issue can be filed at the Student Support Services Office during regular office hours in order to implement the following steps of the Formal Complaint Procedure:


Step One – Initiating a Complaint 

A) Complaint Initiation: The student has ten (10) working days from the date of the incident to file the complaint, utilizing the GCC Complaint Form, to the Student Support Services Office. All supporting documentation must be submitted with the GCC Complaint Form.

B) Notification of Charge: Within five (5) working days, the School of Technology & Student Services (TSS) Associate Dean who oversees the Student Support Services Office (or designee) will begin the investigation and will meet with the person to whom the complaint is addressed (respondent) to inform the respondent(s) that a student has filed a formal complaint. 


Step Two – Informal Resolution: 

The TSS Associate Dean (or designee) will verify if the student and the respondent met earlier in an attempt to informally resolve the matter. If not, and if the student complainant agrees, within five (5) working days, the TSS Associate Dean (or designee) will attempt to schedule the meeting to allow for an opportunity for an informal resolution between the student and the respondent.

If a satisfactory resolution is reached through the informal meeting between the student and the respondent, both the student and the respondent shall sign or acknowledge receipt via GCC email of the written summary that verifies the resolution of the complaint.

If the student finds the response/resolution through the informal meeting is unsatisfactory, the student may submit a written notice of his/her dissatisfaction to the TSS Associate Dean (or designee), within three (3) working days and request to proceed to Step Three.

If the student expresses concern with scheduling an informal meeting with the respondent that is determined by the TSS Associate Dean (or designee) to be a valid concern; the student may submit a written notice to the TSS Associate Dean (or designee) to proceed to Step Three.

For contract employees or campus visitors: 

1) If the student finds the response/resolution through the informal meeting is satisfactory, the TSS Associate Dean (or designee) will prepare a written response of the resolution of the complaint to the student within three (3) calendar days. A copy will be forwarded to the affected GCC contract employee or campus visitor via email. A copy will also be filed with the original GCC Complaint Form. 

2) If the student finds the response/resolution through the informal meeting is unsatisfactory, the student may submit a written notice of his/her dissatisfaction to the TSS Associate Dean (or designee) within three (3) calendar days. The TSS Associate Dean (or designee) will then schedule a meeting with the student and the respondent in an attempt to resolve the complaint.

3) If the student is still dissatisfied with the attempted resolution, the student may submit a written notice to the TSS Associate Dean (or designee) to proceed to Step Four.


Step Three – Formal Resolution: 

A) Additional Attempt to Resolve: If a resolution is not reached at Step Two or the nature of the complaint is determined to require more than a resolution between the student and the respondent, the TSS Associate Dean (or designee) will: 

1. Implement one of the following: 
a. For faculty members: refer the student and the faculty member to the faculty member’s Dean. Within three (3) working days, the Dean will meet with the faculty member and the student in an attempt to resolve the complaint; 
OR
b. For other College employees: refer the student and the employee to the appropriate supervisor. Within three (3) working days, the supervisor will meet with the College employee and the student in an attempt to resolve the complaint;

2. Prepare a written statement summarizing the actions taken prior to the referral and submit this written summary along with a copy of the GCC Complaint Form to the appropriate Dean/supervisor.

B) Resolution reached during Step Three with the appropriate Dean/Supervisor/TSS Associate Dean (or designee): 

For Step Three 1a & 1b above: 
The appropriate Dean/Supervisor will prepare a written response of the resolution of the complaint to the student within four (4) working days. A copy will be forwarded to the affected GCC employee within five (5) working days. A copy will also be provided to the TSS Associate Dean (or designee) to file with the original GCC Complaint Form. 

C) Resolution not reached during Step Three with the appropriate Dean/Supervisor/TSS Associate Dean (or designee): 

The appropriate Dean/Supervisor, will refer the student and/or the affected GCC employee to the President. The referral will include a copy of the GCC Complaint Form and the Dean’s/Supervisor’s written summary of the unresolved complaint. The student referral must be made within five (5) working days.


Step Four - Resolution by the President 

For contract employees or campus visitors: The TSS Associate Dean (or designee) will include a copy of the GCC Complaint Form and a written summary of the unresolved complaint to the President’s Office. The student referral must be made within five (5) working days. The President will meet with the student(s) and affected GCC employee/contract employee/campus visitor in an attempt to resolve the complaint. The President’s decision is final. The President’s Office will provide a memorandum of the final decision to the student and the respondent.

Time for complaints and grievances: If GCC is not in session during part of these proceedings or in instances where additional time may be required because of the complexity of the case or unavailability of the parties or witnesses, any of the time periods specified herein may be extended by the Dean of Technology and Student Services. If a time period is extended, the complainant and the person against whom the complaint has been filed will be so informed. 

Note: Communication with student for conference(s) can be done through class, phone or email. Class and phone communications will be first attempted. If it is difficult to contact the student through these methods, a notice will be emailed via GCC email address or mailed to the student’s address on record. 
 

Educational Resources

Learning Resource Center/Library Services

On December 10, 2010, the Guam Community College Learning Resource Center, which houses the Library, opened in a new two-story 22,000 square foot state of the art facility. This facility is the first Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design or LEED-certified building for the Government of Guam. The LRC facility includes a reading area/collection section, computer work areas, a computer lab, small group meeting rooms, audio visual rooms, staff areas, and a large group meeting room.

Reference and instructional services are available for classes and individual library users. The Library presently maintains a permanent collection of about 21,000 items comprised of books, periodical titles and videos. Reference books, multimedia materials, magazines and newspapers are available for in-library use. Circulating books may be borrowed for a two-week period; videos may be borrowed for two (2) days. Overdue fines are charged. Internet access is provided as well as accessibility to the DYNIX Public Access Catalog (DPAC) and EBSCO host full-text periodical database. The Library web-page with current information can be found on the Guam Community College website.

The Learning Resource Center librarian administers and maintains the online resources for student and faculty use.  The online resources such as the SirsiDynix and EBSCO databases help support instruction and are checked to ensure availability and proper functioning of the high-quality digital resources. Individual student guidance and instruction will be provided in searching and use of resources such as eBooks and ePeriodicals to help with reference questions, research papers, and other academic and reading needs.  Service will be offered for reference, research and technical support via face-to-face, phone, email, or Google Meet from 8:00 am to 8:00 pm.

Faculty assistance with planning and using the online resources will be provided on an appointment basis and will be delivered via face-to- face, phone call, email, or Google Meet.  This will include assistance with EBSCO ePeriodical and eBook databases, boolean searches, and presentations about formulating searches and retrieving results from the databases.


Accommodative Services for Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities can be provided with auxiliary aids when needed for success in attaining their academic/vocational goals. If classes required by students with special disabilities have been scheduled to meet in relatively inaccessible facilities, the College will either reschedule the classes to accessible facilities or make special arrangements to ensure ready access by students with disabilities to those classes. Students with disabilities are urged to contact the Accommodative Services Coordinator well in advance of registration for classes.

For more information concerning services at the College for persons with disability-related needs, contact the Office of Accommodative Services (OAS), Building 2000, Suite 2139. The office telephone number is (671) 735-5597 or TDD (671) 734-8324. 

The Office of Accommodative Services may also provide services remotely to GCC students with disabilities. Contact may be made through email, phone, or virtual meetings. OAS may also provide remote assistance to help register students online and clarify questions regarding course requirements. OAS has access to Banner and will be able to help students identify issues related to courses and assist with health clearances.


Tutoring Services

Guam Community College provides tutoring services for students in an effort to help them meet their educational objectives. The focus of these services centers primarily on English and math skills. 

Reach for College provides free Tutoring & Academic Support.  Tutoring services will be conducted via face-to-face, Google classroom, or Google Meet; every tutor will be assigned to a specific Google classroom based on their subject expertise. Students requiring tutoring services will be referred to a specific tutor based on the subject.  The service will be offered daily, Monday through Friday from 8:00am to 5:00pm. Tutoring services may also be provided in the evening and on Saturday. Students may sign up electronically or call the Reach for College office for face-to-face tutoring or online virtual tutoring.

Assessment, Institutional Effectiveness, and Research

Assessment at Guam Community College is viewed as a collective effort to demonstrate commitment to an institutional dialogue about student learning. There are two major reasons that drive all assessment processes at GCC: accountability and improvement. A policy document adopted by the Board of Trustees on September 4, 2002 (Policy 306, Comprehensive Assessment of Instructional Programs, Student Services, Administrative Units and the Board of Trustees) is the institutional mandate that fuels all campus-wide assessment activities. Three goals effectively guide the Office of Assessment, Institutional Effectiveness, and Research (AIER) in its mission of assessment excellence at the College:
 
  1. To develop and sustain assessment momentum at the College through capacity building efforts that will empower constituents to use assessment results for accountability and improvement;
  2. To systematize assessment protocols, processes and policies both in hardcopy and online environments and thereby allow the College to meet its ACCJC/WASC accreditation requirements; and
  3. To exert and affirm community college assessment leadership regionally and nationally.

At the core of these processes, are three (3) important questions that the institution asks regarding student learning: What do students know? What do they think and value? What can they do? These three questions correspond to the cognitive, affective and behavioral domains of student learning. By continually asking these questions, the College is drawn closer to what it says it can do in both teaching and learning environments and to what it promises its programs and services can deliver in terms of results.

The Office of Assessment, Institutional Effectiveness, and Research (AIER) is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Services & Administration Building, Suites 2226 and 2227 with telephone number (671)735-5520.
 

Housing Information

Guam Community College has no housing facilities. The College does not supervise, recommend or assume responsibility for any housing facility. Private housing is available in the community and prospective students should make their own arrangements.
Although schedules may vary, classes are scheduled between 8 a.m. and 10 p.m. Monday to Friday. Some Saturday classes are offered. Please consult Admissions & Registration for the current schedule.

Scheduling of Classes/Program Content

GCC reserves the right to schedule classes in the order which best suits the overall master schedule and does not violate course prerequisites. Furthermore, GCC also reserves the right to change program content as it aligns with curriculum changes. Such changes are necessary to remain current with professional expectations and industry standards. Note: Policies and procedures apply to all students, unless otherwise indicated. 

Admissions Information

Student Classifications

A student may be admitted to the College in any one of the following classifications:


Declared Student

A student pursuing a postsecondary certificate or degree. To be eligible, a student must:
 
  • Be a graduate of an accredited or recognized United States high school or international high school with equivalent programs of instruction and comparable standards; or
  • Have the equivalent of a high school diploma (e.g., G.E.D); or
  • Have an AA/AS, BA/BS or higher degree from an accredited or recognized United States college or university or a foreign college or university with equivalent programs of instruction and comparable standards; or 
  • Successful completion of at least 45 hours of college credit with a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher from an accredited or recognized United States college/university or a foreign college/university with equivalent programs of instruction and comparable standards; or
  • Be at least fourteen (14) years of age or older and have the ability to benefit from the education or training offered at the College. Students admitted on the basis of ability to benefit from the education or training offered must pass a U.S. Department of Education approved test such as ACCUPLACER prior to enrollment at the College.


Undeclared Student

A student taking courses who has not formally declared in a particular degree, certificate or diploma program at the College. Any person below 16 years of age may only enroll as a postsecondary student in classes held on the College campus, subject to proof of parental consent, home school consent, and College approval. The College will determine if such students are able to benefit from an educational experience delivered in an adult setting.


Full-time international students

Full-time international students at other institutions are also eligible, but international (F-1 Visa) students who are full-time students at the College may not be admitted as Undeclared Students.


Enrichment Student

A student who does not intend to declare a major or pursue a degree program, but who plans to complete more than 18 credit hours of post-secondary work. Such  student would not be required to pursue General Education courses, except in the case where a General Education course is listed as a prerequisite for a course of interest to the student. 

Note: Should an individual enrolled as an enrichment student subsequently decide to pursue a Certificate or Associate degree program, he/she would be limited to applying up to 18 GCC credits toward any chosen Associate or Certificate program.


Diploma Student

A student pursuing an Adult High School Diploma. To be eligible, a student must be at least 18 years old, not a high school graduate and not attending a regular high school program.


Special Student

A student admitted to the College to participate in a special training project or taking special courses or is pursuing an educational objective not usually available at the College. Any person is eligible to be a Special Student.


Training Participant

A person enrolled in courses not applicable towards a diploma, certificate, degree, or other formal credential. The courses are designed for professional development or personal enrichment and is not part of the regular schedule of classes.


Acceptance Information

When all information, forms and documents are received, students applying for admission as a Declared Student or as a Diploma Student will be notified via mail or e-mail of their admission to the College and may be assigned a specific date and time for orientation, placement testing, advisement and registration. 

In some cases, however, a student may not be permitted to enroll in the beginning courses in their program because:
 
  1. Certain prerequisite for the courses has not been met;
  2. The maximum enrollment for the program has been met; or 
  3.  Beginning courses in the program are not offered in that semester.
Only students applying for admission as a Declared Student are formally notified of their acceptance.


Transcripts and Transfer Credit Evaluation
Official transcripts are required for the following:

 
  • To declare into a program of study
  • To validate prerequisites completed
  • To receive credit for courses completed at another institution
  • Students receiving financial aid or veteran’s benefits must have transcripts on file.    


Guidelines for submitting transcripts:
 
  • Students are responsible for requesting official transcripts from each institution attended as well as providing military transcripts through the Joint Services Transcript System (JST), if applicable.
  • Official transcripts must be received in the original, sealed envelope from the college or university.
  • Electronic transcripts are accepted provided they are received from a credible source (Parchment, E-script, National Student Clearinghouse, etc.), scanned and emailed transcripts are not acceptable.
  • Opened, faxed, or scanned and emailed transcripts will not be considered official.

Transcripts should be submitted to the Admissions & Registration Office:

Guam Community College
Attn: Admissions & Registration
P.O. Box 23069
Barrigada, Guam 96921

Students who submit transcripts from other post-secondary institutions or equivalent will have their coursework evaluated for potential transfer credit. Please note that all accepted transfer coursework may not be applied to a specific program of study.


Dual Credit Articulated Programs of Study (DCAPS)

Over 2, 800 students are enrolled in GCC's Career and Technical Education programs which offer DCAPS in the six Guam public high schools. These Programs are:
 
  • Automotive Services Technology
  • Construction Trades: AutoCADD
  • Construction Trades: Carpentry
  • Construction Trades:  HVAC
  • Early Childhood Education 
  • Electronics- Computer Networking Technology
  • Tourism: Lodging Management Program
  • Marketing
  • ProStart (Culinary)
  • Visual Communications 
  • Telecommunications

Under the Dual Credit Articulated Programs of Study (DCAPS), these students can earn college credit in GCC postsecondary programs. 
 
  1. Students must be declared in the approved GCC program which corresponds with the secondary program.
  2. There will be a limit of nine (9) postsecondary credits to be awarded upon successful completion of respective aligned secondary courses at NO COST. A dual credit recording fee of $30 will be assessed to award the remaining postsecondary credits should a program contain a DCAPS agreement that states that there are more than nine credits. The cap per program is 15 postsecondary credits to be awarded.
  3. Students must apply for these postsecondary credits to be awarded within two years after completing high school. If a student fails to apply for DCAPS within two years, the credits will be considered null and the credits must be acquired through the successful completion of its corresponding postsecondary course(s). 
  4. All programs participating in DCAPS will have a course grade of a “B” or better as a minimum requirement for articulation of courses. 


Students must provide the following documents to apply for DCAPS: 
 
  1. Completed Dual Credit Articulated Program of Study (DCAPS) Application Awarding of Credits form
  2. Copy of Certificate of Mastery 
  3. Official copy of high school transcript
  4. Proof of payment of recording fee (if requesting for more than 9 credits to be awarded)

Admissions Procedures

Consideration for admission is based on the complete submission of all required or requested documents. Admission is based on the semester in which a complete application is made. Failure to submit a complete application may result in denial of requested admissions status.
If the student is admitted, the student must, in addition:
 
  1. Clear all health requirements as outlined by the Health Services Center
  2. Take placement tests, if required, and meet with a College counselor or advisor for advisement and program planning.
  3. Register for classes during the registration period and pay all tuition and fees in full within the designated payment period (health services clearance is required prior to registration).

All documents, transcripts and forms submitted by the student during the admission process become the property of the College and will not be returned to the student or forwarded on behalf of the student to any other institution.


New Students

For students with no previous college coursework or less than 45 credits of completed college coursework or equivalent, they must submit the following:
 
  1. Application for Admissions Form.
  2. Proof of high school graduation or equivalent. Submit an official transcript from an accredited and Department of Education recognized high school, or acceptable evidence of comparable academic achievement;  (e.g., satisfactory score on General Educational Development (GED®) or HiSET® tests.).
  3. Other information, forms or documents as requested by the College.


Transfer Students

For students with an AA/AS or BA/BS or at least 45 credits of completed college coursework or equivalent, they must submit the following:
 
  1. Application for Admissions Form;
  2. All official transcripts from accredited institutions of higher learning are required to be submitted at the time of admission in order for transfer credit to be reviewed and awarded; and
  3. Other information, forms or documents as requested by the College.


Diploma Students

For students who have not completed high school or high school equivalency and are requesting to complete the Adult High School program, they must submit the following:
 
  1. Application for Admissions as an Adult High School Diploma Student Form;
  2. Submit official transcripts from all former high schools attended; and
  3. Other information, forms or documents as requested by the College.


Undeclared Students

Students taking courses who have not formally declared in a particular degree, certificate or diploma program at the College, must submit an Application for Admissions Form.


International Students

The College is authorized under federal law to enroll nonimmigrant alien students. Nonimmigrant alien students (hereinafter referred to as international students) are not citizens of the United States or aliens permanently residing in the United States. International students must meet the same admission requirements as all other declared students. In addition, international students must also meet the following special admission requirements:
 
  • Certified translation of foreign transcripts (if applicable):
    • If transcripts are not in English, students must submit, with their Application for Admission as a Declared Student, a certified evaluation of foreign transcript in U.S. equivalencies provided by a National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) approved member (www.naces.org) or Association of International Credentials Evaluators (AICE) member (www.aice-aval.org). Document by document evaluation is recommended for secondary transcripts. Course by course evaluation is recommended for post-secondary transcripts if the student would like a transfer credit evaluation.

  • English Language Requirement: Students must meet the English Language requirement by either submitting one of the following test scores or by providing documentation that meets any of the exemptions.
    • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) applicants are required to score a minimum of 61 (internet based), 173 (computer-based) or 500 (paper-based) on the TOEFL. 
    • International English Language Testing System (IELTS)).  Students choosing to take the IELTS test for admission must take the Academic IELTS. For undergraduate students, the Academic Modules of the International English Language Testing System (IELTS)—a score of 5.5 overall or above for all applicants is needed to meet this requirement.
    • Provide proof of exemption.

Have their scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) submitted directly to the College. Scores must be from a test taken within the previous two years. 


Test Exemptions

International student applicants are exempt from the TOEFL or IELTS examination if they meet at least one of the following:
 
  • Those whose native language is English;
  • Those who score 510 or better on the verbal and 510 or better on the writing sections of the SAT;
  • Those who score 22 in English and 22 in reading sections of the ACT;
  • Those who have completed six years of continuous schooling through the high school or college level in American Samoa, Northern Marianas and/or Guam or in one of the countries listed below (see last bullet);
  • Those who have completed English composition at a regionally accredited U.S. institution with a C or better grade; 
  • Those who completed at least three years of high school in Guam with a cumulative GPA of 3.2 and SAT critical reading of 460 and SAT writing of 460. Admission to summer ELI classes does not imply a waiver of the TOEFL exam for fall or spring semester admission; 
  • Those who place into EN110 (Freshman Composition) or higher at the Guam Community College or the University of Guam, and have a letter of support from the relevant office of the institution (either GCC or UOG) administering the placement test.
  • Those who hold a bachelor’s or master’s degree from a regionally accredited university or college in the U.S. or a recognized university in Australia, Britain, Canada (excluding Quebec), Ireland, or New Zealand;.
 
Applications and/or requests for scores to be sent to the College should be made by contacting one of the above-mentioned entities (e.g. TOEFL, IELTS).

International students will not be notified of their admission to the College until all admission requirements have been fulfilled.

International students must have an official Notice of Admission and Form I-20A-B in their possession before coming to Guam.

International students must also meet the following requirements:
  • Fall within the limit for international student enrollment as mandated by the College.
  • Submit a Supplementary Information Form for International Students (including evidence of ability to pay all expenses themselves, or through the support of their families in their native country, or through a sponsor who is either a citizen or permanent resident of the United States).
  • Submit any other forms, documents or information as may be required by the College.
  • International students will be admitted only to a specific certificate or degree program. International students, except in extraordinary circumstances, will not be permitted to change their program of study and must enroll for a minimum of 12 credit hours per semester in courses which are required for their specific program of study. 
  • International students are required to register for English their first semester at the College and each subsequent semester until all English requirements of their program of study are met.
  • Guam Community College has no dormitory facilities for students. The majority of international students rent rooms or apartments near the College. International students are encouraged to seek housing with English speaking families on Guam in order to facilitate speaking English on all possible occasions.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement regulations do not permit international students to accept employment while attending college. An international student should not count on being able to accept employment on Guam to work one’s way through college. 

Academic Information

Registration, Withdrawals, and Other Changes

MyGCC is Guam Community College’s web-accessible information system that brings all major functional areas such as Student, Financial Aid, Finance, and Human Resources together into a single database information system. With MyGCC, students can register and pay for classes, check grades, and communicate with peers or faculty via student email. The launching of MyGCC is another example of GCC’s commitment to preparing students for success in the classroom and at the workplace using proven and cutting-edge technology. Although students may now register online, the Admissions & Registration Office is also always available to assist students and applicants. A Schedule of Classes is published each semester and is available to students before registration.

A Schedule of Classes can be viewed and printed via GCC’s website, www.guamcc.edu. Students should plan their program of studies using the Catalog available online at:
https://guamcc.edu/academics/college-catalog.

A student is obligated to pay the tuition and fees for registered courses unless officially dropped on or before payment deadline.  Failure to make payment by the due date may result in drop from all classes. However, it is the responsibility of the student to verify whether he or she has been dropped for nonpayment prior to the start of the semester. For more information regarding dates and deadlines, please review the academic calendar.


Online Registration

Registration can be performed either at the Admissions & Registration Office or online by logging in on to MyGCC via the College’s website, www.guamcc.edu. All students are encouraged to seek academic advisement prior to registration in order to discuss course prerequisite, program requirements, or educational goals. Students in certain programs are required to meet with their academic advisors to obtain approval for their schedule before they register. These students include those declared in the Adult High School Diploma Program, Associate of Arts in Culinary Arts, Certificate in Practical Nursing, and the Criminal Justice Academy. All international students must clear with Admissions & Registration and obtain schedule approval from their academic advisor prior to registering. In addition, all students must clear outstanding financial obligations with the College at the Cashier’s Office, and have immunization updated pursuant to Guam public law, P.L. 22-130. Updated health records must be submitted to the GCC Health Services Center by new and returning students. Students who maintain their continuous student status, students enrolled for classes in at least one regular semester (Fall or Spring) each academic year, do not have to update their health records each academic year unless advised to do so.


Class Withdrawal

The deadline for withdrawing from a class is about six weeks prior to the end of the term, and is published in the academic calendar available in the catalog as well as the College’s website, www.guamcc.edu. Any student who fails to officially withdraw from a class by this deadline will be assigned any grade, except “W” for the class.  Classes officially dropped prior to the end of the schedule adjustment period will not appear on a student’s academic record. Classes officially withdrawn will be assigned a “W” on the academic record. 


Complete Withdrawal

Students who wish to withdraw completely from the College must do so by the deadline for dropping a class. Students who completely withdraw from the College must reapply for admission to the College, if they subsequently desire to re-enroll in the College.


Change or Addition of Program/Major

Declared Students enrolled at the College with a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better may change their program or major or add a second program or major at any time during a regular semester but it will not go into effect until the following semester. Request forms are available at the Admissions & Registration Office or online at: https://guamcc.edu/forms.


Change of Personal Data

Any change of personal data such as name, address, telephone number and citizenship must be submitted to the Admissions & Registration Office. Copies of supporting documents are required for change of name and citizenship. Some visa restrictions apply to international students.


Auditing Courses

Students wishing to audit a class must complete all admission and registration requirements and procedures, including payment in full of all tuition and fees. Students will be permitted to register on a space-available basis only after all students taking the course for credit have been registered. No credit or grade is given for a course which is audited. Students may participate in class activities only to the extent permitted by the instructor of the class. Students wishing to audit a class must indicate this status at the time of registration.


Class Attendance

Regular and prompt class attendance is expected of all students. Each student is responsible for informing instructors of his or her absences (if possible) and to make arrangements with instructors to complete work missed due to his or her absence from class.

Transfer of Credits from Postsecondary Institutions
GCC will accept credit transfer for all courses successfully completed at any college or university in the United States which is accredited by its regional accrediting body, affiliated accrediting body, the Distance Education Council, or any accrediting body recognized by the United States Department of Education (e.g. MSCHE, NEASC-CIHE, NEASC-CTCI, NCA-HLC, NWCCU, SACS, WASC-ACCJC, WASC-ACSCU, or the DETC) or which is recognized and approved by the Department of Education or Ministry of Education in a foreign country. Transfer credit is given for courses taken at another college or similar institution that closely correspond to those offered at GCC. When transfer credit is granted for a particular course, the requirements for the course have been successfully met (only courses with a minimum grade of “C” are considered for transfer), and credit is indicated on the student’s transcript. No letter grade is provided. Transfer credit will only be considered if:
 
  • Official transcripts are received directly from the institution where the credits were earned or can be hand delivered by student provided the transcripts are in their original sealed envelope.
  • The course is at the postsecondary level; with GCC, this means the course is at the 100 level or above and receives undergraduate level credit.
  • Credits earned outside of GCC are equal to or greater than the credits to be received from GCC.
  • The student has earned a “C” grade or higher (or equivalent).
  • The course is not a credit awarded for life experience.

Full English translations of course descriptions as well as a NACES approved course by course evaluation are required for any international student seeking to receive transfer credit. Program faculty or Department Chair will determine whether any transfer course does or does not fulfill any program requirement, except where there is clear equivalence between the transfer course and the GCC course, in which case the Registrar makes the decision. Transfer students will be advised to contact the Department Chair of their program for evaluation of any course that does not transfer as equivalent to a GCC course but which the student believes should satisfy a program requirement. A form or template will be utilized for this purpose.

The transfer evaluation provided to the student at the beginning of the student’s matriculation at GCC will be entered into the student’s permanent record unless specific errors are found (e.g. misidentifying the number of credits for a course or giving a student credit for a course more than once) or the student requests and is granted a modification by the Dean and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

It is the student's responsibility to have transcripts of all previous work sent to the College and to request an Evaluation of Records by the Admissions & Registration Office.


Advanced Placement

Students may be placed in higher-level courses or a sequence of courses on the basis of their high school achievement, training or test results. Credit may be granted for the courses passed but both placement and the granting of credit are at the discretion of the Registrar in consultation with the Department Chairperson, the Deans, or the Vice President for Academic Affairs, as necessary and appropriate.

Credit granted through advanced placement will be recorded with a “CR” (satisfactory completion) grade. Students who wish to be considered for advanced placement must request an evaluation of their high school achievement, training or test results for this purpose.
 

Recognition of Non-Traditional Learning

Credit-By-Examination College Sponsored Examinations 

Credit-By-Examination (CBE) is available for some courses at Guam Community College. Interested students should contact the appropriate Dean or Department Chair to determine whether or not this option is available for any particular course.
 
  • Only continuing students in good academic standing may apply for credit by examination.
  • Examinations shall be provided to the student no more than 10 working days after the Petition for Credit-By-Examination form has been approved and all applicable fees have been paid.
  • No more than 9 credits applicable to a student’s declared Certificate program may be earned through CBE.
  • No more than 12 credits applicable to a student’s declared Associate Degree program may be earned through CBE.
  • Students are allowed no more than three attempts to receive Credit-By-Examination for any one course. For each attempt, all applicable fees must be paid, without exception.
  • The Department Chair is responsible for determining the examination in consultation with his or her faculty and Dean. Examinations must be no more rigorous or no less rigorous than what a student may experience as a regularly enrolled student. 
  • Standardized examinations should be prepared by the Department Chair in conjunction with his or her faculty and kept on file by the Department Chair in anticipation for CBE requests.
  • Credit-By-Examination should not be used for general education courses (English, math, science, etc.) with the exception of foreign languages offered by the institution (e.g., Japanese, Korean, CHamoru, and American Sign Language). 
  • A student receives a grade of CR for passing Credit- By-Examination; student receives a grade of NC for failing Credit-By-Examination. Courses passed by examination do not carry grade or grade points. 
  • Credit-By-Examination is recorded on a student’s academic record for each course challenged through Credit-By-Examination. After an unsuccessful attempt at Credit-By-Examination, students must wait six months before making another attempt.
  • Credits earned through CBE do not fulfill the residency requirement of degree, certificate or diploma.
  • Credits earned through CBE do not transfer to other higher learning institutions. Typically, Credit-By-Examination is used to award credit for relevant prior training, work experience, or competencies using paper or electronic examinations or practical examinations


Credit-by-Examination Fees

Assessment Request $25.00 per request
Challenge Exams $75.00 per exam, for paper or computer-based exam
Practical Exam $100.00 per practical exam

*All fees are non-refundable


External Examinations Credit

External Examinations Credit-Granting Procedure includes the following:
 
  • The various forms of credit evaluation are available only to students currently registered at the College.
  • Letter grades will not be granted for credits awarded through this program. Instead, “CR” will be used and will not be calculated into the GPA.
  • Credits awarded through this program will be identified as such on the student’s academic record. They may not be accepted by other institutions.
  • These credits may not be used to meet the 12-credit residency requirement for degrees and certificates unless the requirement is waived by the Dean.
  • Credit may be granted for either electives or required courses.
  • Credit will be granted only toward a student’s declared program and may require reevaluation if the program is changed.
  • Evaluation of alternative learning experiences older than ten years, or any period of time designated by a department, may include review for currency.
  • Evaluation resources such as the American Council on Education (ACE) guides will be consulted, but the College reserves the right to set its own credit-granting policies, which may differ from that of ACE or any other external resource.
  • The number and type of credits awarded will be governed by the extent to which the knowledge and skills documented in the evaluation process are comparable to the competencies described in existing Guam Community College course documents.

External Examinations Credit is awarded by the College on the basis of the following examinations:

 
CLEP General Examinations Credit Hours
English Composition 6
Humanities 6
Mathematics 6
Natural Sciences 6
Social Sciences & History 6


CLEP general examinations in English (with essay) will be accepted by the Guam Community College if the score reaches or exceeds the 35th percentile. If the English exam (with essay) reaches or exceeds the 35th percentile, the College will allow a transfer credit equivalent to EN110 (3 credit hours).


Other External Exams
 
  • CLEP Subject Examinations
  • College Board Advanced Placement Exams
  • DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (DSSTs)
  • ACT Proficiency Examination Program (PEP)
  • USAFI Subject Standardized Tests (USSTs)
  • USAFI End-of-Course Examinations
  • StraighterLine

A minimum score for credit is determined using the American Council of Education (ACE) recommendations. However, the College reserves the right to reject recommendations from such sources (refer to credit granting procedure above).


Credit for Prior Learning (CPL)

The College recognizes that students may have had prior learning experiences, which might translate to academic credit. The College adheres to the following standards for assessing such experience:
 
  • Credit should be awarded only for learning, and not for experience.
  • College credit should be awarded only for college-level learning.
  • Credit should be awarded only for learning that has a balance, is appropriate to the subject, and lies between the theory and practical application of the subject.
  • The determination of competence levels, and of credit awards must be made by appropriate subject matter and academic experts.
  • Credit should be appropriate to the academic context in which it is accepted.

The College recognizes that students may have acquired learning through traditional college experiences as well as from work and life experience, independent reading and study, the mass media and participation in formal courses sponsored by associations, businesses, government, industry, the military, unions and learning reflected in various examinations.

The College will evaluate prior institutional or college learning as transfer credit and as a basis for advanced placement. The College will evaluate extra-institutional or non-college learning using the prior learning assessment process which includes, but is not limited to, departmental challenge exams or portfolio assessment. See also “Educational Credit for Training Programs” In the next section.
GCC's Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) evaluation processes include the following:

 
  • Departmental Challenge Exams (please see Credit-By-Examination College Sponsored Examinations) 
  • Transfer of credit from other institutions
  • Credit articulated through PLA


Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) Fees

Assessment Request $25.00 per request
CPL Credit Award 20% of prevailing resident tuition rate 

Note: No charge for CLEP, AP, credit via formal agreements, or military credit.

In addition, a variety of practices exist for awarding credit for learning which has taken place outside of higher educational institutions. These include, but are not limited to: 
  1. The American Council on Education: Military and Corporate 
  2. National College Credit Recommendation Service
  3. Standardized Examinations such as AP, CLEP, DSST, and Excelsior College Exams

For more information on Prior Learning Assessment at Guam Community College, please contact the Admissions & Registration Office, or visit the PLA webpage at https://guamcc.edu/prior-learning-assessment


Recognition of Sponsored Learning

Military Education

Credit may be granted for armed services school and military experience only as recommended by the American Council on Education (ACE).


Educational Credit for Training Programs

The College awards credit for non-collegiate sponsored instruction as recommended by the National College Credit Recommendation Service (NCCRS) or the American Council on Education in The National Guide To Educational Credit For Training Programs. These credits do not fulfill the residency requirement of (ACE) degree, certificate and diploma programs. Nationally-recognized training and certification programs will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.


Special Project Courses  

Special courses are open-entry/open-exit courses. A student may register for a special course during any regular semester or summer session. To register for a special project course, a student must complete the Application to Take Form. A student must work with either a counselor or an advisor as well as the supervising faculty member in preparing the Application to Take Form. The number of credits to be earned must be specified on the form. A student must obtain the approval of the counselor or advisor, supervising faculty member, Department Chairperson, Dean and the Registrar in order to take a special project course. All special project courses must be approved and start no later than two (2) weeks after the first day of classes for each semester for Fall and Spring, and one week prior to the start of Summer terms.
 

Credits, Grades and Examinations

Credit Load

A student may not register for more than 15 credits in any one semester except under special circumstances. If a student’s program of study requires registration for more than 15 credits in any one semester, counselor or advisor approval is required. 


Credits

At the College, each credit hour represents one hour per week in class and two hours outside of class devoted to preparation. Credit is granted in recognition of successful work in attaining Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) in specific courses. See General Requirements for Certificates and General Requirements for Associate Degrees for a statement on SLOs as applied to programs in a later section of this catalog.


Prerequisite

Course Prerequisite are courses to be completed or conditions to be met before a student is eligible to enroll in a specific course. A student who has enrolled in a course without first completing all course prerequisites may be dropped from that course. Prerequisites are identified in course descriptions. Waivers for course prerequisite can only be obtained from the Department Chairperson of the department which oversees the course. For example, SO130 requires the completion of EN110; therefore, only the Department Chairperson overseeing sociology courses may waive the Prerequisite. As a general rule, however, prerequisite waivers are strongly discouraged.


Course Waivers and Substitutions

Recommendation for a course waiver is made by the Department Chairperson or academic advisor. For each course waiver there must be an accompanying recommended course substitution. Credit requirements cannot be waived. A declared student wishing to have a course waived or substituted must complete the following steps:
  1. Submit a Course Substitution Form, which indicates the waiver, to a counselor/advisor who forwards the request to the Department Chairperson.
  2. The Department Chairperson will confer with department members, and if they concur with the request, will forward the recommendation to the appropriate Dean for approval.
  3. If the Dean concurs with the request, it will be forwarded to the Registrar for verification and recording. If the Dean does not concur with the request, it will be returned to the student with justification via the Department Chair. The Dean’s decision is final.

It is important to note that course substitution takes the place of a required course in a program, for as long as the course substitution meets the content and/or spirit of the requirement. The Department Chair must consult with the Dean to make this determination.


Repeating a Class

Credit is allowed only once for a course. A course may be repeated if a grade of “D,” “F,” “NC,” or “Z” was received. Only the newly earned grade will be counted and used in computing the grade point average. If a student received a “C” or better and the course is repeated, the first grade will be counted towards grade points even if the second grade is higher.

Note:  Prior to fall 2007, the class being repeated will be assigned a repeat grade of “R” before the original grade. Beginning fall 2007, all repeated courses will appear as a letter grade with the repeat indicator appearing in a separate column. All classes being repeated will not affect grade point average.


Official Transcripts

Official transcripts will be prepared for students upon request. Students must complete the following steps:

Submit a transcript request either in person or through the National Student Clearinghouse. There is a fee for transcripts, so please review the transcript request form for fees. The student must not owe any financial obligations to the school nor have any other holds preventing the release of an official transcript.

It is the student’s responsibility to update their address and mailing information in their student records. Such information may be updated online via MyGCC or submitted to the Admissions & Registration Office. 

See National Student Clearinghouse for additional information. Official transcripts will not be faxed or emailed. Additionally, transcripts will not be released to a third party without the student’s written authorization.

Final grades can be accessed by students via the College’s self-service portal, MyGCC.


Grading

The assignment of final course grades is the responsibility of each faculty member, which begins with a clear statement in the course syllabus and in discussion with the students in the class. Defining the criteria upon which grades will be determined, is established by the curriculum documents. Instructors must identify the components and the weight of each that make up the final grade in the class syllabus.

In addition to defining the criteria, instructors are responsible for applying the criteria consistently and carefully, using professional judgment for their assessments, and in all cases, being fair to reflect student performance in the context of GCC’s expectations for student achievement and the established grading scale. Faculty evaluation of student work may be appealed using the process described in the Student Grievance Procedure found in the Student Handbook. An Evaluation Review Committee shall be convened to review the faculty member’s evaluation of the student’s work. Students may contact a Counselor for further guidance.  The Student Handbook can be found at www.guamcc.edu.


Grading System

Grades are earned for each course in which a student is officially enrolled. GCC uses a 4-point grading scale. Grade Point Average (GPA) is determined by letter grades A through F using the designated points assigned to each. The grade points assigned to the letter grades are as follows: 

 
  • A    4.0 = Excellent achievement
  • B    3.0 = Above average achievement
  • C    2.0 = Average achievement
  • D    1.0 = Below average achievement
  • F     0.0 = Failing 

The following are grades issued to students which do not impact the student’s GPA:

 
  • TF = Technical Failure
  • TW = Technical Withdrawal
  • W = Withdrawal
  • I = Incomplete
  • CR = Satisfactory Completion
  • NC = Unsatisfactory Completion
  • P = Satisfactory Completion/Test-Out (Used for developmental courses only)
  • Z = Unsatisfactory Progress made, repeated enrollment required (used for developmental courses only)
  • AU = Audit
  • TC = Transfer Credit


Credit/No Credit Option

Students should consult their counselor or advisor before taking courses using the Credit/No Credit option; this option must be declared in writing prior to the first day of instruction. Credit/No Credit is used for all Credit-By-Examination challenges.


Incomplete or “I” Grade

Incomplete (I) grades may be assigned only when academic work has been interrupted by circumstances beyond the student’s control. Incomplete grade requests must be initiated by the student and approved by both the instructor of record and Department Chair by filing an Incomplete Grade Request form. The form must be submitted by the student, along with appropriate documentation if deemed necessary, outlining the circumstances.  The instructor and the program chair must approve the request before the last day of the semester in which the Incomplete will be granted. 

The student must complete all academic work to replace the “I” grade according to the terms of the agreement with the instructor of record by the end of the next consecutive academic term or the grade will be determined to be an “F” (“Z” for Developmental Education courses). The grade of “I” counts as credits attempted but does not affect GPA.


Technical Failure or “TF” Grade

If a student registers for a class but fails to attend the class, the instructor will award a “TF” grade indicating that the student never attended the class. The “TF” will be entered on the student’s permanent record.


Technical Withdrawal or “TW” Grade

If a student registers for a class but fails to meet all College requirements for registration in that class (e.g., course prerequisite, immunization/health requirements, etc.), that student may be administratively withdrawn from that class. In such instances, a “TW” grade will be entered on the student’s permanent record.


Grade Point Average

A student’s grade point average (GPA) is computed by dividing the total grade points earned by the total credits attempted, excluding those credits for which “AU,” “CR,” “I,” “NC,” “P,” “TF,” “TW,” “W,” or “Z” grades are assigned and courses repeated (see section on Repeating a Class for more information).


Determining Applicable Catalog

Students maintaining continuous enrollment at Guam Community College may graduate according to the requirements of the catalog in effect at the time of initial acceptance as a Declared Student or according to the requirements of any single catalog in effect during subsequent terms of continuous enrollment thereafter. 

Students who are dismissed as Declared Students may only be reinstated using the most current catalog. A semester in which a student earns course credit will be counted toward continuous enrollment. Noncredit courses, audited courses, failed courses, or courses from which the student withdraws do not count toward the determination of continuous enrollment for catalog purposes.

Students who do not enroll for two consecutive regular (fall & spring) semesters are no longer considered continuously enrolled, and must meet requirements of the catalog in effect at the time they return.

Students are not obligated to enroll and earn course credit during summer terms, but summer enrollment may be used to maintain continuous enrollment status.

Students who return during a summer term after an absence must follow the requirements of the catalog in effect for the following fall semester.

Students who do not enroll for two consecutive regular semesters as well as students dismissed from the College as a Declared Student must complete the Application for Re-Entry and must submit it to the Admissions and Registration Office. Students must meet with their advisor or with a counselor prior to the submission of this Application.

Academic Standing

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) standards apply to all Declared Students including all students who receive financial aid at the College. Students receiving financial aid may also visit the Financial Aid Office located in the Student Services &
Administration Building 2000, Room 2114, 2115, or 2116, or call 735-5543/4.


Evaluation of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)

The Admissions & Registration Office evaluates SAP at the end of each semester. Student progress is reviewed for cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and progress toward completion. The minimum CGPA for certificate postsecondary programs is 2.0. In addition, the College will determine the cumulative successful completion rate (CSCR) equals to at least 67% of credits attempted. In determining the total number of credit hours attempted, all credits attempted at GCC under the student’s post-secondary academic history will be counted. Grades from transfer courses will not be included in the CGPA.


Academic Probation

At the end of each term, the academic record of each Declared Student enrolled for that term will be compared to the standards for Satisfactory Academic Progress. Any Declared Student who is not making Satisfactory Academic Progress toward a degree or certificate will be placed on Academic Probation at the end of that term. Any student on Academic Probation may lose financial aid eligibility. Financial Aid Students may also visit the Financial Aid Office in Room 2114, 2115, or 2116, Student Services & Administration Building or call 735-5543/4.  Students will be notified of their academic standing by the Admissions & Registration Office.

A Declared Student who has been placed on Academic Probation may enroll for at least one subsequent, probationary term. If, after the probationary term, the student’s cumulative academic record meets at least the minimum standards, the student will be taken off Academic Probation. If the student’s cumulative academic record does not meet the minimum standards applicable to that student, but the academic record during the probationary term demonstrates progress toward meeting the cumulative minimum standards required for Satisfactory Academic Progress, then that student may enroll for another probationary term at the College at the discretion of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Such action is limited to two consecutive semesters.


Dismissal

If the student does not meet at least the minimum standards applicable to that student and fails to demonstrate progress toward meeting the cumulative minimum standards required for Satisfactory Progress during the probationary period, then that student is re-classed as an Undeclared Student. Once satisfactory progress is achieved, the student may re-apply for admission as a Declared Student.


Reinstatement as a Declared Student

A student who has been re-classed as an Undeclared Student may continue to enroll at the College (does not apply to an international student, F-1 Visa). Coursework completed as an Undeclared Student may be used as a basis for application for readmission as a Declared Student. A student who applies for readmission to the College as a Declared Student must demonstrate the ability to meet current academic progress standards. A student who is readmitted to the College as a Declared Student following dismissal from the College will be readmitted on Academic Probation and will be subject to current standards as stated in the College Catalog at the time of reinstatement.


Appeals

Any student has the right to appeal placement on Academic Probation and Dismissal from the College as a Declared Student. Any appeal must be in writing and include supporting documentation. All appeals will be first submitted to the Registrar who will adjudicate all appeals. A student may appeal the decision of the Registrar using the Student Grievance Procedure.


Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) for students utilizing Veteran Education Benefits

In order to meet SAP, a Veteran student must maintain a minimum cumulative and term GPA of 2.0 and successfully complete a minimum of 67 percent of the courses attempted.  Failure to do so will result in Veteran Academic Probation (VAP) being placed on the student's record, restricting open registrations for future terms. Not meeting SAP may eventually restrict a student's ability to use veteran education benefits at Guam Community College.


Veteran Academic Probation (VAP)

A student will be placed on a Veteran Academic Probation (VAP) if the cumulative or term GPA falls below a 2.0, or if the completion of courses attempted falls below 67 percent.  The VAP policy requires that the student contact the Financial Aid Office at Guam Community College to be advised on the steps to have the VAP removed, and briefed on the possibility of being placed on Veteran Benefit Denial (VBD) if SAP is not met while on VAP status. A student will be allowed to register while on VAP.  If the student achieves a cumulative and term GPA of 2.0 or higher and reaches a completion percentage of 67 percent for all courses attempted, the VAP will be removed, allowing the student to register for future terms without restrictions.


Veteran Benefit Denial (VBD)

If while on a VAP, the student does not meet the minimum cumulative and term GPA of 2.0 and does not successfully complete at least 67 percent of the courses attempted for that term, the student will be placed on a Veteran Benefit Denial (VBD). This action will be reported to the VA by the College through the VA's formal process. Once placed on VBD, the student will be denied the use of any and all VA benefits and will be responsible for payment of tuition and fees. Guam Community College will not certify for veteran education benefits under any chapter while on a VBD. Students on a VBD may continue to take courses at Guam Community College via alternate funding sources, such as financial aid. The VBD will be removed and upgraded to VAP when a cumulative and term GPA of 2.0 or higher and a completion percentage of 67 percent for all courses attempted is reached, allowing the student once again to utilize veteran education benefits at Guam Community College. The College will retroactively certify these successful courses after the grade is posted. 


Appealing a Denial

A student can appeal a VBD decision through the College’s administrative appeals process. The appeal should be submitted to the Financial Aid Office, and will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.  Please visit the Financial Aid Office to discuss your appeal or email financialaid@guamcc.edu.  
 

Scholastic Honors

Deans’ List

Guam Community College publishes the Deans’ List in the fall and spring semesters of the academic year. Students qualify and earn the recognition by achieving the semester grade point average of 3.75 or higher with enrollment and completion of 12 or more credits for the semester (Pass/Fail and Credit/No Credit courses will not be counted). The Deans’ List is published at the completion of the semester by the Admissions & Registration Office. 


President’s List

Guam Community College publishes the President’s List in the fall and spring semesters of the academic year. Students qualify and earn the recognition by achieving the semester grade point average of 4.0 with enrollment and completion of 12 or more credits for the semester (Pass/Fail and Credit/No Credit courses will not be counted). The President’s List is published at the completion of the semester by the Admissions & Registration Office. 


Graduation Honors

Postsecondary students graduating from Guam Community College with a cumulative grade point average of 3.50 or higher based on 24 or more credit hours of credit completed at Guam Community College will graduate “With Honors.”


Time Limit for Coursework

In areas of study in which the subject matter changes rapidly, material in courses taken long before graduation may become obsolete or irrelevant. Coursework that is more than eight (8) years old is applicable to completion of degree requirements at the discretion of the department of the student’s major course of study. Departments may accept such coursework, reject it or request that the student revalidate its substance.

The eight-year limit on coursework applies except when program accreditation agencies limit the life of coursework to less than eight (8) years. Departments may also require students to satisfy current major requirements rather than major requirements in earlier catalogs, when completing earlier requirements is no longer possible or educationally unsound.
 

Commencement Ceremony

A commencement ceremony is held annually at the end of the spring semester. The College urges all of its graduates to participate in the commencement ceremony. Students who receive their degree, certificate or diploma in the fall semester within the same academic year or the summer semester the prior academic year may participate in the commencement ceremony.

Instructional Programs

Degree, Certificate, Apprenticeship, Industry Certification, and Diploma program requirements are separately listed in the Catalog.

Continuing Education and Lifelong Learning

The College offers courses outside its regular schedule of courses for students interested in personal enrichment, skill training, computer software applications, or to meet other academic needs. The College also hosts various conferences and workshops to enable participants to upgrade their skills and knowledge in a variety of areas.

Continuing Education and Lifelong Learning courses are primarily skill-oriented and are designed to meet the specific training needs of those seeking to upgrade skills in their workplaces, as well as those seeking to develop work skills for entry or reentry into the workforce. The courses vary in length, depending on the breadth and depth of the skill to be taught.  

The Office of Continuing Education & Workforce Development, located on the first floor of the Student Services & Administration Building, welcomes requests or suggestions for course or event offerings. A catalog of courses may also be requested from the office. For more information, call 735-5574 or 735-5640.

Continuing Education Units (CEUs)

The Continuing Education Unit (CEU) is used by Guam Community College to facilitate the accumulation and exchange of standardized information about participation of individuals in noncredit continuing education. Please note the following four (4) points:
 
  1. CEU credit is for career enrichment and/or advancement. CEUs may be integrated into regular credit courses, provided that the CEU is clearly defined and there is assurance that the CEU does not replace regular credit requirements approved by GCC.
  2. CEU contact hours can be structured within a regular credit course, provided that the ten contact hours to one CEU equivalency is maintained. CEUs are awarded on a pass/fail basis. Letter grades are not to be used, as the goal of the CEU experience is learning enrichment/advancement and not mastery of scholarly material.
  3. CEU programs will be governed by the same standards that GCC imposes on regular programs. GCC will have direct quality and fiscal control over all CEU activity within the institution.
  4. CEUs cannot be used for degree credit requirements. CEUs and regular credit cannot be earned at the same time for the same learning experience.

Further background information about these units is contained in the following statements:

One CEU is defined as ten contact hours of participation in an organized continuing education experience under responsible sponsorship and capable direction of qualified instructors.

Program objectives, content, format, methods of instruction, methods of evaluation and program schedules will be established prior to the determination of the number of contact hours and appropriate CEUs. CEUs do not convert to degree credit. 

Permanent records for individual participants in CEU programs will be kept. Course fees will be negotiated between the requesting agency, organization or individuals and GCC.

Review, evaluation and approval of CEUs for an educational experience is the responsibility of the Office of Continuing Education & Workforce Development, in consultation with the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Contact 735-5574 or 735-5640 for additional questions.

Certificate of Enrichment or Completion

Individual programs of study are developed based on specific requests made by individuals, organizations, or companies for their immediate and/or long-term needs. Customized programs may be developed by the Office of Continuing Education and Workforce Development (CEWD) to fulfill the needs of these customers. A certificate of enrichment/completion may be awarded by CEWD to individuals who complete the programs and meet these specialized programs. Certification of enrichment/completion is an acknowledgement that the student has completed a combination of courses and related activities organized by the College for the sole purpose of attaining the educational objectives requested by the participant or trainee.

English-as-a-Second Language

This is recommended for adults who are learning English as a non-primary language. Coursework integrates listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in English. Courses are offered through the Office of Continuing Education as CEUs only.  To register for ESL, please call the Adult Education Office at (671) 735-6016 or visit the office staff in the Foundation Building, 2nd floor.

Postsecondary Policy

All Undeclared or newly Declared Students in regularly scheduled postsecondary courses are required to take a placement exam by the time they have enrolled in 12 credits of classes.

All Undeclared or newly Declared Students enrolled in regularly scheduled postsecondary courses must be enrolled in or have completed their EN096 Basic English Level I or EN097 Basic English Level II (or higher) general education requirement by the time they have enrolled in 12 credits of classes, and must enroll in or have completed MA098 Intermediate Algebra (or higher) general education requirement by the time they have enrolled in 15 credits. This means that students may take only nine (9) credits before they must begin meeting their general education requirements.

Withdrawal from Math and English General Education Required Courses

Students, who have not met their math and English General Education requirement(s) may be allowed to drop or withdraw from math and English courses only if they wish to withdraw completely for the semester. However, students will not be permitted to drop or withdraw from these courses under any other circumstance.

Placement testing is not mandatory for admission to the College. Completion of placement testing or equivalent, however, is required for enrollment into English and Mathematics courses. Therefore, students who plan to enroll full-time in a program should take the placement test to be eligible for a full load of courses.

GCC Industry Testing Services

Guam Community College also serves as a testing center for licensure recognized by the following:
 
  • Electronic Technician’s Association International
  • Microsoft
  • Prometrics
  • A+ Service Technician
  • Federal Communications Commission
  • Cisco Systems and General Education Development
  • Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA)


GCC provides professional examination services for the following:
 
  • American Council on Exercise
  • Certified Chef de Cuisine (CCC)
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE)
  • Nephrology Nursing Certification Commission
  • National Academy of Sports Medicine
  • National Restaurant Association 
  • Transportation Security Administration
  • U.S. Customs & Border Protection


GCC Test Center is also recognized to administer testing for the following:
 
  • American Culinary Federation
  • Castle Worldwide, Inc.
  • Certiport®
  • Crane Institute Certification (CIC)
  • KRYTERION™
  • Pearson VUE
  • Performance Network Assessment (PAN)
  • Prov Inc.
  • PSI Services LLC
  • Western Governors University (WGU)
  • WorkKeys®

For more information regarding testing services, contact the Office of Continuing Education & Workforce Development at 735-5574 or 735-5640

Institutional Learning Outcomes (ILOs)

The end of fall 2009 marked the formal adoption of GCC’s Institutional Learning Outcomes, also known as ILOs. The ILOs were developed as a task of the General Education Committee with input from all faculty, the Faculty Senate, the College Governing Council (CGC), and the Board of Trustees. These ILOs represent what knowledge, skills/abilities, and values students should develop and acquire as a result of their overall experiences with any aspect of the College.  The ILOs link all divisions, departments, units, and programs at the College regardless of whether they are directly (academic) or indirectly (non-academic) involved with students. Every employee and office at the College exists to support students and help them excel; this includes the administration, student support services, faculty, maintenance, procurement, etc.

The five (5) ILOs represent broad outcomes in various areas depicted as the College’s core values. Due to their universal and broad coverage, it is not expected that a single course, or program for that matter, address all identified outcomes. Rather, it is through the culminating integrated experience students have in their academic and campus life which will enable them to acquire these ILOs.

The emphasis on ILOs and outcomes-based assessment has helped transform the College into a more learner-centered institution. Guam Community College remains committed to 
strengthen its focus on learning outcomes, ultimately leading to quality education and a productive workforce. In keeping with its mission that Guam Community College is a leader in career and technical workforce development, providing the highest quality student centered education and job training for Micronesia, the College community has established the following Institutional Learning Outcomes which were recommended by the Faculty Senate, approved by the President, and adopted by the Board of Trustees (December 2, 2009):

Guam Community College students will acquire the highest quality education and job training that promotes workforce development and empowers them to serve as dynamic leaders within the local and international community. Students will demonstrate:

Use of acquired skills in effective communication, and quantitative analysis with proper application of technology

Ability to access, assimilate and use information ethically and legally

Mastery of critical thinking and problem-solving techniques

Collaborative skills that develop professionalism, integrity, respect, and fairness

Civic responsibility that fosters respect and understanding of ethical, social, cultural, and environmental issues locally and globally.
 

Tuition, Fees, Payment, & Financial Assistance.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition

Resident/Military & Dependents/Veteran Students - $130.00 per credit hour

A “Resident Student” is a student whose permanent home is on Guam and pays Guam income taxes or is claimed as a dependent by someone who pays Guam income taxes. Active duty military personnel and their dependents as well as Veterans fall under the Resident Tuition rate.


Nonresident Student - $155.00 per credit hour

A “Nonresident” is a student whose permanent home is away from Guam and does not pay Guam income taxes.


International Student - $180.00 per credit hour

An “International Student” is a non-citizen that holds a non-immigrant visa, e.g., B, C, D, F, H, J, L or M visa.

All students will be classified as resident, nonresident or international student for tuition purposes when they register for classes. When the College is unsure of a student’s residency classification, the College will assess the higher tuition rate. The burden of showing that the residence classification should be changed is on the student.

The Residence Classification Policy and Procedures of the College are available for inspection at the Admissions & Registration Office.

The College reserves the right to periodically adjust tuition, but will conduct public hearings in compliance with the Administrative Adjudication Act.


Fees

The following fees are charged each semester:
Registration Fee $22.00
Student Identification Card $7.00
Library Fee $15.00
Technology Fee $73.00
Student Activity Fee $15.00
Student Health Fee $15.00
Total Fees $147.00


Notes on fees

Student Identification Card Fee - All students are required to have a Student Identification Card except for students enrolled exclusively in short-term courses and special offerings.

Library Fee - The Library fee is considered to be a special fee for tuition and fee refund purposes.

Technology Fee - Of this amount, $36.50 will cover costs of current operations and the remaining $36.50 will be set aside in a special fund to systematically upgrade computer labs, software and other technology-related student services.

Student Activity Fee - Funds are used to support student activities organized under the purview of the Center for Student Involvement (CSI) Office.

Student Health Fee - Students may receive PPD, MMR vaccinations, and emergency care services at the Student Health Center free of charge. Students failing to appear to have test results read and who are required to repeat a test will have to pay a second student health fee.


Laboratory Fees

Some courses offered by the College involve the consumption of materials and supplies by each student enrolled in them; lab fees are charged for these classes. Lab fees are listed in the Schedule of Classes each semester.


Educational Records

Copies of a student’s educational records made pursuant to the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 will be made at a cost of $1.00 per page.


Audit Fees

Audit fees are the same as those for regular credit classes.


Late Fee

The College will charge a non-refundable late fee of $37.00 to be assessed for the following:
Students under “Payment Plan,” or Students under financial assistance whose financial assistance does not cover 100% of student obligation by the end of the semester. The College will not assess a Late Fee if, a student registers only for non-credit courses, special course, or open-entry courses.


Application for Graduation for Degree, Certificate or Diploma

The College will charge a non-refundable $15.00 fee.  The Application for Graduation fee includes one Diploma and one official set of transcripts which will be available approximately three weeks after the end of the semester in which all requirements have been met. The Commencement Ceremony is held each year at the end of Spring Semester. 


Diploma Re-Order Fee

The College will charge $15.00 to reorder a degree, certificate or diploma to be picked up by a student. If it has been over a year since graduation, the reorder fee is $35.00. A $15.00 postage fee will be charged for a degree, certificate or diploma to be mailed to a student.


Placement Test Fee

The College will charge $22.00 for the College English and Math placement tests.


Official Transcript Requests

Students may request copies of their academic record (transcript) either online via the National Student Clearinghouse: https://www.studentclearinghouse.org/secure_area/Transcript/login.asp?FICEcode=01536100 or at the Admissions & Registration Office in the Student Services & Administration Building. Transcripts are usually prepared within five (5) working days. Each copy of a student’s transcript costs $5.00. A rush service request of transcripts costs $15.00 per transcript and will be available in 2 business days. No transcript will be issued by the College if the student has an outstanding financial obligation with the College. Transcripts will not be faxed or emailed.


Tuition & Fee Waiver

On a space available basis, residents of Guam for at least the last 5 years and who are 55 years of age and older do not pay tuition and fees for classes appearing in the regular term. Proof of age and residency will be required at the time of registration. All applicable tuition and course fees will be charged for courses taken outside of the regular term. 


Veteran Benefits and Transition Act of 2018, Section 3679 of Title 38, United States Code

Effective August 1, 2019, Guam Community College will allow a Covered Individual who is entitled to educational assistance under Chapter 31, Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment or Chapter 33, Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits, and dependents under the Chapter 33 Transfer of Entitlement, to remain registered in their courses without being dropped or otherwise penalized due to delay in payment of tuition and fees by the VA. In order to receive this benefit, the student must apply for benefits by filling out the "Certification Request Form" and provide the "Certificate of Eligibility" and/or an approval from the VA Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor. These forms can be found at the Guam Community College Financial Aid Office, Tiyan VA Benefits Office, or the va.gov.

It is the student's responsibility to pay the school any balance remaining should the student register in courses that are not within the approved education plan, or if the student is not entitled to 100% education benefits. Any award returned to the VA eligible for return of funds is the student’s responsibility.
 

Payment Information

Payment in full of all current tuition and fees and outstanding obligations is required.  Payment may be made at the Cashier’s Office or online using the following payment methods:

Payment Methods Accepted at Cashier’s Office:  Cash, Check, VISA, and Master Card.

Payment Methods Accepted Online: VISA, Master Card, and American Express.  To make payment online, please visit our website at mygcc.guamcc.edu/MyAccount.

Payment by Check:  Make check payable to Guam Community College or GCC.  Please include student’s name, student ID number, and contact number of check writer.  Check payments are subject to a ten (10) business day hold for bank clearance.  Requests will be processed and documents will be released after check payment has cleared the bank.

Failure to pay full tuition by required due date will result in one or more of the following actions:
 
  1. Student will not be allowed to register and receive grades;
  2. Transcripts and/or diploma will not be processed; and
  3. Outstanding accounts will be referred to a collection agency.  

(The student shall assume responsibility for all collection agency fees, legal fees, and court fees necessitated by default in payment.)
 

Tuition and Fee Refund Policy

All students are obligated to pay for registered courses unless they officially drop a course(s) before the first day of class. Please refer to the Academic Calendar for specific dates and deadlines. If students do not officially withdraw from courses, they will be liable for the full amount of tuition and fees even if they did not attend classes. 

The "Regular Semester" refund policy will be applied as follows to semester long courses offered:
 
  1. If the course drop occurs on or before the last day of schedule adjustment, 100% of the tuition, special fees and laboratory fees will be refunded.
  2. After the last day of registration, no refunds will be made for semester long courses.
  3. Full (100%) refund of tuition and all special fees and laboratory fees will be made by the College to students for classes cancelled by the College.


Refund Exceptions

Any student facing extenuating circumstances during a semester resulting in withdrawal from credit classes may submit the Tuition/Refund Waiver Request Form. Requests will only be considered if it is submitted with proper documentation. Requests may only be submitted within one year of the end of the registered semester.

Students who wish to withdraw from all registered courses in a semester for the following reasons must submit a written request for a refund.
 
  1. Student with a serious illness, verifiable by a doctor's written statement that the illness prevents the student from attending all classes for the semester. The doctor's statement must be submitted with refund request, and any other documents that will help substantiate your request.
  2. Serious illness of an immediate family member that prevents the student from attending all classes for the semester. Immediate family members include spouse/partner, father, mother, grandfather, grandmother, child, foster child, grandchild, stepchild in any one incident. Serious illness verifiable by a doctor's written statement that the illness prevents the student from attending all classes for the semester.
  3. Death of a student's spouse/partner, child, or parent that prevents the student from attending all classes for the semester. Copy of death certificate must be submitted.
  4. Death of a student. Copy of death certificate must be submitted.
  5. Student is in the Armed Forces and is called to active duty and assigned to a duty station, verifiable by a copy of the orders, will be allowed to withdraw and receive a 100% refund/waiver of tuition, provided courses have not been completed.

Requests for a total withdrawal from the college or courses for one of the above reasons may result in a class credit, provided courses have not been completed. All decisions made by the College are final.


Limitation

Never attending is not an allowable refund/waiver exception or an excuse of the debt incurred through registration.


Tuition Refund Process

Drop/add refund dates are widely publicized. Therefore, appeals based on lack of awareness of the dates will not be reviewed.


Submitting Your Request 
Refund requests must be submitted in writing ONLY via:-
Mail:
Guam Community College ‐ Refund
c/o Admissions and Registration
P.O. Box 23069 GMF
Barrigada, Guam 96921


Email (preferred):
gcc.refund@guamcc.edu

A decision will be made within 6‐8 weeks of submittal and the student will be notified by either their Guam Community College email address or by mail. Please note all decisions are final.


Consideration for Financial Aid Students

It may not be in your best interest to file a request. You may be responsible for repayment of financial aidreceived. Please check with the Financial Aid office before submitting a request.

Students receiving federal financial aid, including loans, who completely withdraw (officially or unofficially) before completing 60% of the semester, will be subject to the federal return of Title IV funds calculation. This calculation is based on the percentage of the semester completed. Generally, the student is required to repay a portion of the federal financial aid which has been paid to the student. This calculation is mandated and must be applied regardless of the circumstances for withdrawal. For more information, contact the Financial Aid Office by e‐mail at financialaid@guamcc.edu or call 671.735.5543/4.


DoD:  Policy of Return of Unearned Military Tuition Assistance (TA) Funds

Military Tuition Assistance (TA) is awarded to a student under the assumption that the student will attend school for the entire period for which the assistance is awarded. When a student withdraws (officially or unofficially) on or before 60 percent of the course(s) meeting period has been completed, Guam Community College will comply with the Department of Defense policy to return unearned TA funds on a proportional basis through the 60 percent portion of the period for which the TA funds were provided. After a student completes 60 percent of the term, all TA funds are considered fully earned. 

The return of unearned military TA funds will follow the same guidelines as the Department of Education Title IV funding, outlined in the Withdrawal Policy for Return of Title IV Funds policy. The calculation is completed for each course individually. Once the completion (earned) percentage is calculated, the College will multiply the percentage by the amount of TA funds awarded to determine the amount of TA funds earned. The unearned TA funds will be returned to the military service, not to the service member, within 45 days of the determination of withdrawal.


15 week course withdrawal
 
Before or by the 1st day of class: 100% returned to DoD
During Weeks 1 – 3: 75% returned to DoD
During Weeks 4 – 5: 50% returned to DoD
During Weeks 6 – 8: 25% returned to DoD
During Weeks 9 -15: 0% returned to DoD


Students Called to Active Military Service

Recognizing the need to accommodate students who are asked to serve their country during wartime, the College will allow students called to active military duty, while enrolled in a given semester, to be provided a refund of tuition and fees. As an alternative to refunds, students may opt for credit against future enrollment. Students will be required to provide to the Admissions & Registration Office and the Business Office, written notice of active military status and indicate whether a refund or credit is preferred.


Returned Check Policy

If a student makes a payment for tuition and fees using a check and the check is returned, the student will be contacted by the GCC Business Office regarding the returned check. Once contacted, the student must pay the amount of the check in full by cash or cashier’s check within 48 hours of notice. Additionally, a $37 returned check fee is assessed. A $37 late fee may also be assessed. If a student fails to make payment, he or she will be dropped from courses and will be referred to a collection agency. Moreover, neither grades nor transcripts will be released until the full amount of the returned check plus the service charge is paid in full. 


Outstanding Balances

Students who have an outstanding balance at the end of a semester will not be allowed to register until the amount is paid in full. In addition, neither grades nor transcripts will be released until the past due balance is paid in full. If a student fails to make payment by the required due date, he or she will be dropped from courses and will be referred to a collection agency. 
 

Cost of Attendance

AY 2021-2022

The College estimates the cost of attendance as a full-time student at the College during the 2021-2022 academic year (ten months, including fall, spring and summer semesters) to be as follows:
 
Tuition and Fees $4,224.00 
Room and Board $10,500.00 
Transportation* $1,200.00 
Personal Expenses $2,650.00 
Books and Supplies $1,200.00 
Total Estimated Cost of Attendance $19,774.00 

*Plus round-trip airfare for off-island students.


NOTE: Students whose permanent residence is not Guam should add the cost of round-trip travel from their permanent residence to Guam and back again.

International students should contact the Admissions and Registration Office for more information regarding the cost of attendance.

These estimates of the cost of attendance as a full-time student are based on the following assumptions:
  • An independent student is sharing housing costs with one other student.
  • AY 2021-2022 is a ten (10) month period of class attendance.

 

Financial Aid Services

The College believes that each individual should have the opportunity to develop his or her potential to the fullest extent possible. As part of the commitment to that principle, the College makes available financial aid programs which can provide students with money to pay for tuition, books, supplies, transportation and living expenses while they attend college.


Financial Aid

The Financial Aid Office provides information and advice on how students can gain financial assistance from various sources. Such assistance is available to students with financial need through the Federal Student Aid Programs that include Pell Grant, Federal Work Study, and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant. The College is also approved to certify Veteran’s benefits. In addition, various independent scholarship programs are available based on a combination of factors such as merit, interest in certain degree programs, and in some cases, need. The College does not administer federal student loan programs. However, the Government of Guam Student Assistance Loan program is available through the office. Applications are available in January and due on April 30 of each year. Students may receive complete financial aid counseling services at the College’s Financial Aid Office located on the 1st floor of the Student Services & Administration Building.


Financial Aid Application Deadlines

The College processes financial aid applications throughout the year. However, most scholarship programs have application deadlines established by the grantor. In the case of Federal Student Aid Programs, students must have completed both the government forms and the entire admissions process at the College in order to qualify. This process should be started well in advance of the semester to be attended in order to prevent delays in payment. Students should complete their applications early to ensure maximum awards. No applications will be accepted after the end of the school year. For further information, contact the Financial Aid Office at (671) 735-5543/4.
 

Types of Financial Aid

Pell Grant 

This is a grant, which does not need to be repaid. It is based on financial need, and upon maintaining satisfactory progress at the College. Depending on income, students can be eligible for up to $6,0495.00 per year for full-time enrollment.


Federal Work Study Program (FWSP)

Students who qualify for the Pell Grant and who still have remaining financial need may sign up for College Work Study as a means of earning income. These awards are made on a first-come, first-served basis until the funds are spent. Job placement is done by the Financial Aid Office. The awards usually range between $500 and $1,000 per year, depending on need.


Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

Students who qualify for the Pell Grant and who fall into the greatest need category may also receive FSEOG awards. Typical awards are around $300 per year.


Veterans Educational Benefits

The College is approved for Veteran’s benefits. Counseling regarding individual eligibility is available either at the Financial Aid Office or at the Veteran’s Administration Offices in Guam. Veterans must comply with established Financial Aid Office policies in order to receive benefits, and must meet established standards of progress.


Federated States of Micronesia Scholarship Programs

The neighboring island states have scholarship funds for their students. The island states have generally made the applications and information available to the College. Students who wish to apply may contact either their island’s scholarship program office, or the Financial Aid Office.


Scholarships

Various private groups and organizations provide scholarships for GCC students. Information about these scholarships is available at the Financial Aid Office and at www.guamcc.edu.


Eligibility

Financial Aid, with the exception of gift aid and merit-based scholarships, is awarded on the basis of a student’s financial need. A student’s financial need is defined as the difference between the cost of the student’s education and the student’s resources to meet that cost. In general, a student may be eligible for financial aid under the following conditions:
  • The student can demonstrate that a financial need exists;
  • The student is making satisfactory progress toward a postsecondary educational goal;
  • The student is enrolled as a Declared Student;
  • The student is a U.S. Citizen, U.S. National, U.S. Permanent Resident, a permanent resident of the Federated States of Micronesia, or a permanent resident of the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, or the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the Republic of Palau; and
  • The student, if required by federal law, attests to his/her Selective Service status.


Application Procedures

Students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) in order to be considered for any Federal assistance. These applications are available online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Students must apply and qualify annually on the basis of demonstrated financial need. To apply, students should first obtain a personal identification number or PIN at www.pin.ed.gov and then go to www.fafsa.ed.gov to fill out the form or click on the Financial Aid links at www.guamcc.edu, then select the “Financial Aid Checklist” and follow the directions on that list.  The Guam Community College school code is 015361.  In addition to the FAFSA, students will need to complete an “Application for Admission as a Declared Student” which is available on the GCC website or at the Admissions desk in the Student Services and Administration building.


Awards

To be eligible for Title IV funds, a student must be a regular student as defined in section 600.2 of the General Provisions regulations.  A regular student is defined as: “A person who is enrolled or accepted for enrollment at an institution for the purpose of obtaining a degree, certificate or other recognized educational credential offered by that institution.”  Therefore, students are not eligible to receive Title IV assistance for credit hours/coursework, which will not count towards the completion for that student’s degree program requirements. Pell grants are awarded by the Financial Aid Office and disbursed at mid-term. Students can view their account information online at www.guamcc.edu.


Student Responsibilities

In order to receive any form of assistance from the Financial Aid Office, all applicants must:
  1. Complete all necessary application forms and pertinent documents on or before the established deadlines of each school year.
  2. Be admitted as a “Declared Student.”
  3. Enroll in a program of study leading towards a postsecondary degree or certificate program.(Adult High School Diploma may be eligible for some financial assistance, e.g., VA Benefits).
  4. Enroll in courses required for declared program of study.
  5. Satisfactorily meet progress standards for financial aid. (For further explanation, please visit the Financial Aid website)..
  6. Inform the Financial Aid Office of any changes that may affect their financial assistance.
  7. Pick up award checks on the scheduled disbursement dates.
  8. Comply with all other policies established by the Financial Aid Office as described in the Student Handbook and Financial Aid Guide.
  9. VA students must have previous education credits/military training evaluated. Submit an evaluation request form along with transcripts, DD-214’s etc. to the Registrar’s office.

Students who fail to comply with the above requirements may jeopardize their eligibility for assistance. Furthermore, students are urged to work closely with their program advisors and/or counselors in planning their course of study at GCC.

For more information regarding Financial Aid, contact:


Financial Aid Office
Guam Community College
P.O. Box 23069
Barrigada, Guam 96921
(671) 735-5543/44
www.pin.ed.gov
www.fafsa.ed.gov

Adult High School, Industry Certification & Apprenticeship

Adult Basic Education (ABE)

The ABE programs are instructional programs designed to help adult learners master the skills and content necessary to enhance their employability skills by improving their ability to speak, read, or write the English language and increase their ability to function effectively in society. These courses can help adult learners prepare to enroll in the Adult High School Diploma Program or prepare for an administration of the GED®. 

For more information regarding Adult Basic Education, please call 735-6016 or email at adulteducation@guamcc.edu


High School Equivalency

Adult High School Diploma Program Guidelines

The mission of the Adult High School Diploma Program (AHSDP) is to assist students with the completion of a secondary high school diploma and transition into postsecondary education and/or the workforce.  

GCC is mandated through Public Law 14-77 to provide adult education to individuals who are 16 years of age and not enrolled or required to be enrolled in a secondary school under Guam Law (P.L. 34-104; Compulsory Age 18 yrs. old). The AHSDP supports the College’s mission statement and the personal, academic, and career goals of adults on Guam who have not earned a high school diploma. The AHSDP offers adults the opportunity to earn credits toward their diploma while receiving education and training, in preparation for the workplace and/or postsecondary education. Students will be required to apply for admission to the College as a diploma student once they are determined eligible for the Adult High School Diploma Program. 


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Adult High School Diploma program, students will be able to:
  1. Demonstrate proficiency in basic skills areas, as necessary for entry level employment and/or postsecondary education.
  2. Analyze complex informational text independently. 
  3. Apply technical knowledge and skills necessary for workplace productivity.  


Eligibility

GCC is mandated through Public Law 14-77 to provide adult education to individuals who are 16 years of age and not enrolled or required to be enrolled in a secondary school under Guam Law (P.L. 34-104; Compulsory Age 18 yrs. old) and is:
 
  • Basic skills deficient;
  • Does not have a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent and has not achieved an equivalent of education; or
  • An English language learner who has limited ability in reading, writing, speaking, or comprehending the English language and whose native language is a language other than English or lives in a family or community environment where a language other than English is the dominant language.

Individuals who score a 239 or higher in reading and a 236 or higher in math may enroll in the AHSDP.

Individuals scoring below 239 in the reading and 236 in the math portion of CASAS will begin by taking courses to refresh basic skills until scores of 239 in reading and a 236 in math and above are met. Individuals who score above 239 in reading and 236 in math may go directly into the AHS Diploma Program or schedule to take the high school equivalency diploma (GED®). Additionally, students who score below a 236 will receive the following assistance while attending basic skills courses: tutoring services from the Reach for College Program.


Access to WorkKeys

The individual’s advisor/counselor must approve his/her enrollment into courses for the semester. Students will be limited to register in no more than 12 credit hours of adult high school courses (English, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Student Success Workshop) and postsecondary career and technical (CTE)/elective courses.

AHS students shall adhere to the following guidelines in order to maintain eligibility to continue the AHS Diploma Program:
 
  1. Students must attend all registered courses. Students receiving more than five (5) absences in any registered course will receive a failure grade (F) or unsatisfactory completion (NC), whichever is applicable, for the course. If a student receives more than two (2) failure grades (F) and/or unsatisfactory completion (NC) resulting from absences, the student will no longer be eligible to continue with the AHS Diploma Program and will be referred by their advisor/counselor to the Adult Education Office for other program options.
  2. Students who receive a failure grade (F) or unsatisfactory completion (NC) will be allowed to retake the course only once. Students may retake no more than two (2) courses while enrolled in the AHS Diploma Program. After retaking two (2) courses and it is determined that the student will be unable to complete the requirements of the AHS Diploma Program, the student will be referred by his/her advisor/counselor to the Adult Education Office for other program options.
  3. After the official add/drop dates posted in the Schedule of Classes, any student who withdraws (W), who has been technically withdrawn (TW), and/or who abandons any course he/she has registered in resulting in a failure grade (F) or a technical failure grade (TF) will not be eligible to continue to participate in the AHS Diploma Program. 

Admissions and Registration will automatically disapprove the student’s application for admission as a Diploma Student and the student will be referred by the advisor/counselor to the Adult Education Office for other program options.

Students will be loaned the required books for their registered courses with an obligation of returning all books to the Adult Education Office at the end of the semester. Outstanding obligations will result in a hold on grades, transcripts, or other processes.


Adult High School Diploma Requirements

Course Requirements:

Successful completion of courses in the following areas (either at GCC or through accepted transfer credit):

English Language Arts & Literacy     9 credit hours
Mathematics  9 credit hours
Social Science 6 credit hours
Science 6 credit hours
Student Success Workshop 3 credit hours
Computer Skills 3 credit hours
Electives 9 credit hours 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS 45


Nine (9) credits of Career and Technical Education (CTE) electives should be from the same career area as part of the student's approved educational plan. Development of an Individual Educational Plan with counselor or advisor is required.

Adult High School students must achieve a minimum cumulative GPA of a 2.0 in order to earn an Adult High School Diploma.

High school credits completed elsewhere will be converted to credit hours to meet the requirements of the adult high school diploma using the following equivalency: one (1) Carnegie unit = three (3) credit hours on 050-099 level. Career and Technical Education (CTE) credits earned at GCC through the AHSDP may articulate to GCC’s postsecondary programs, pending the completion of a signed Memorandum of Understanding.


Adult High School Diploma Requirements

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

EN068

Language Arts Literacy

3

EN081

Literature Survey

3

EN091

Fundamentals of Communication

3

AEMA050

Algebra I

3

AEMA060

Geometry

3

AEMA070

Algebra II

3

SI051

Earth Science

3

SI061

Biology

3

SS063

American Government

3

History (Choose 1)

SS081

US History I

3

SS082

US History II

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

SO099

Student-Centered Success in College

3

OA101

Keyboarding

3

Electives

Course

Course Name

Credits

 

Elective Choice 1

3

 

Elective Choice 2

3

 

Elective Choice 3

3

Program Total

45



High School Equivalency Diploma
Eligibility for Testing


Minimum Age:  

18 years of age and not currently enrolled or required to be enrolled in high school.


Assessment

All applicants must take the free 2-hour CASAS Appraisal which is administered daily. An individual must score at least 239 in reading and 236 in math on the CASAS Appraisal in order to take the GED®.


Fees  

There is no charge to take the CASAS Appraisal. GED® has four computer-based content areas (Reasoning through Language Arts, Reasoning through Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies); the cost to take each content area is $31.25 or $125 for all four content areas. Retake cost is $25.00 per content area. Payment must be made online at https://ged.com


How to Apply

To apply for the CASAS Assessment, the applicant must present a valid driver’s license, passport, military ID or other form of government-issued identification that shows his/her name, address, date of birth, signature, and photograph to a staff member at the Adult Education Office.


Testing Schedule

Assessment Test: The CASAS Appraisal is administered every Monday to Thursday at the Guam Community College campus (Adult Education Office), Bldg. 6000, Room 6215, there are two testing periods from 9:30am-12:00pm & 1:30pm-4:00pm, for Testing and Retesting: The GED® Test has to be scheduled online at https://ged.com, at the Guam Community College Technology Center.


To Receive a Diploma

Individuals may apply for a diploma at the Guam Community College, Continuing Education and Workforce Development, Building 2000, Room 2137. 


Minimum Test Scores  

For the GED®, the minimum test score is 145 on each content area and a total of 600 on all four areas.

Minimum Age
To receive a high school equivalency Diploma, the applicant must be 18 years of age and has not completed high school.


Residency

In order to take the GED®, a person must be a resident of Guam. You are considered a resident of Guam if your permanent home is on Guam and your most recent income tax forms were filed on Guam, or if you are a dependent of someone whose most recent income tax forms were filed on Guam. Active duty military personnel and their dependents are considered residents, as are citizens of the Freely Associated States of Micronesia. Please be prepared to submit a stamped copy of your income tax form as proof of residency.

For more information, contact:
High School Equivalency Office
Guam Community College
P.O. Box 23069
Barrigada, Guam 96921
671-735-5646 

*Adult Basic Education courses have been moved from the regular College Catalog to the Continuing Education Catalog. Courses are scheduled and maintained by the Office of Continuing Education and Workforce Development. For more information regarding these courses, please call (671) 735-5629.

 

Industry Certification of Course Series Completion

These courses or series of courses are nationally and internationally recognized by industry and government as providing a significant body of information. These courses also prepare students for industry specific licensure listed below.
  • Nursing Assistant Industry Certification
  • Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) Industry Certification
  • Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) Industry Certification
  • Industry Certification in Cosmetology

Many of these courses are offered through the Office of Continuing Education/Workforce Development, located on the 1st floor of the Student Services & Administration Building (Building 2000).
 

Nursing Assistant Industry Certification

The courses listed below prepares students to function professionally and competently as Nursing Assistants under the supervision of the LPN, RN, or MD in such clinical areas as home health, community health, hospitals, clinics, private medical offices, and mental health. Graduates will be able to generate the knowledge and illustrate the skills required to pass the National Nurse Aide Assessment Program Exam which leads to becoming a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA).  

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Certified Nursing Assistant Program.  

Upon successful completion of this certification, students will be able to: 
 
  1. Identify the principles of prevention, therapy and rehabilitation for patients of all ages.  
  2. Distinguish the roles of a Nursing Assistant in a health care team.  
  3. Apply the Nursing Assistant principals and skills learned in class/lab to the clinical setting.  
  4. Demonstrate proficiency and knowledge of nursing assistant skills in preparation for the NNAAP (National Nurse Aide Assessment Program) written and practical exam.


Course Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

NU101

Nursing Assistant

4

HL131

Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers

1

Total Requirements

5



Note: On August 14, 2018, the Guam Board of Nurse Examiners notified the College that the Certified Nurse Assistant program is on probation. The College is working diligently to address the situation.

Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) Industry Certification

The courses listed below will prepare the student to take Cisco’s CCNA exam. These courses prepare the student for configuration of networks using routers, switches and hubs (Local Area Network). Continuing coursework prepares the student to understand Wide Area Networks (WAN). Next, a student focuses on Network Layers, Cisco Internetwork Operating System software user interface, router configuration, startup and setup configuration sources for Cisco IOS software TCP/IP, configuration router interfaces with IP and routing protocols. Other coursework involves LAN design and implementation. Final preparatory coursework includes fundamentals of Wide Area Networks. Coursework must be taken in sequence. After successful completion of the four networking courses, a student will be ready to take the Cisco CCNA exam.

 

Course Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

EE265

Computer Networking I

5

EE266

Computer Networking II

5

EE267

Computer Networking III

5

EE268

Computer Networking IV

5

Total Requirements

20

Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) Industry Certification

The courses listed below will prepare the student to take Cisco’s CCNP exam. The CCNP certification indicates advanced knowledge of networks. These courses train the student to install, configure, and troubleshoot local and wide area networks for enterprise organizations with networks from 100 to more than 500 nodes. The content emphasizes topics such as security, converged networks, quality of service (QoS), virtual private networks (VPN) and broadband technologies. Coursework must be taken in sequence. After successful completion of the four professional networking courses, a student will be ready to take the Cisco CCNP exam.
 

Course Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

EE271

Advanced Computer Networking I

5

EE275

Advanced Computer Networking III

5

EE___

Approved EE Elective Course

3-5

Total Requirements

13-15

Industry Certification in Cosmetology

Successful completion of the program will prepare students to pass The National–Interstate Council of State Boards of Cosmetology Practical Examination in order to obtain a Guam license to qualify for positions in the cosmetology field. Students will acquire skills required to pass the National-Interstate Council of State Boards of Cosmetology Practical Examination and the two-part Guam Board of Cosmetology exam. Students will acquire skills needed to work in a variety of cosmetology-related occupations such as a cosmetologist, esthetician, salon owner, manicurist, hair color specialist, and/or makeup artist. Students will also gain effective interpersonal skills and demonstrate ethical conduct in a lab and shop setting.

The Industry Certification in Cosmetology program offers students opportunities to develop the skill, knowledge, attitudes and leadership qualities required to meet licensure standards of the Guam Board of Cosmetology. Through lecture, demonstrations and lab practice, students will complete a minimum of 1600 hours in this four-semester program with the option of exiting earlier in the program to apply for a manicurist license. Students may recover clock hours via a Continuing Education credit course. If a student is not present by the end of the second day of class, he or she may be dropped. A minimum grade of 75% is required to demonstrate competency in all courses.

Upon successful completion of this certification, students will be able to: 
  1. Master the skills needed for entry-level work in a variety of cosmetology and related occupations. 
  2. Apply content knowledge and skills as indicated in the National-Interstate Council (NIC) of State Board of Cosmetology Practical Examination. (https://nictesting.org/).
    Utilize effective interpersonal skills and practice professional ethics needed to succeed in the cosmetology profession.
 

Course Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

CM101

Cosmetology I

10

CM102

Cosmetology II

10

CM104A

Cosmetology III

5

CM104B

Cosmetology IV

5

Total Requirements

30

Total Contact Hours Required

1600

Apprenticeship Programs

The College administers the Apprenticeship Training Program through the Office of Apprenticeship of the United States Department of Labor, in partnership with the Guam Contractors Association and individual employers.

During the term of apprenticeship, the apprentice learns a craft or trade through formal on-the-job training (OJT) under close supervision of a skilled worker or journey-worker and through related classroom instruction at the College. In general, an apprentice works at an actual job setting with an employer during the day and attends related classes at the College during the evenings and/or Saturdays.

In order for an apprentice to be eligible to receive a Certificate of Completion of Apprenticeship, the apprentice must satisfactorily complete a minimum of 144 hours of classroom-related instruction per year plus 2,000; 4,000; 6,000; or 8,000 hours of practical on-the-job training (OJT). Upon satisfactory completion of the required training, the apprentice is issued a Certificate of Completion of Apprenticeship from the Office of Apprenticeship and Training, United States Department of Labor.

For more information on the Apprenticeship Training Program, contact the Continuing Education and Workforce Development Office, Student Services and Administration (Building 2000), Suites 2122 or 2128, or call (671) 735-5571. 

The terms of apprenticeship are determined by the occupation in which the student is being trained. Training is available in the following occupational trades: 
 

APPRENTICESHIP TRADES

APPROXIMATE OJT HRS

CONTACT HOURS

APPRENTICESHIP TRADES

APPROXIMATE OJT HRS

CONTACT HOURS

Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Mechanic

6000

432

Inspector Building

6000

432

Auto Body Repairer

8000

576

Instrument Technician

8000

576

Automobile Mechanic

8000

576

Insulation Worker

8000

576

Boiler Operator

8000

576

IT Generalist

2880

216

Carpenter

8000

576

Line Installer Repairer

8000

576

Cement Mason

4000

288

Lineman

8000

576

Chief of Partie

8000

576

Machinist

8000

576

Child Care Development Specialist

3500

288

Maintenance Building Repairer

4000

288

Computer Operator

6000

432

Maintenance Mechanic

8000

576

Computer Programmer

4000

288

Marine Machinery Mechanic

8000

576

Construction Equipment Mechanic

8000

576

Office Manager/Administrative Services

4000

288

Cook

6000

432

Operating Engineer (Heavy Equipment Operator)

6000

432

Construction Craft Laborer

4000

288

Pipefitter

8000

576

Crime Scene Technician

4000

288

Plumber

8000

576

Diesel Mechanic

8000

576

Power Plant Operator

8000

576

Drafter, Civil

8000

576

Public Relations Representative

6000

432

Drafter, Structural

6000

432

Pump Servicer

6000

432

Electrical Technician

8000

576

Relay Technician

4000

288

Electrician

8000

576

Rigger

6000

432

Electrician Meter Repairer

8000

576

Sheet Metal Worker

8000

576

Electrician, Ship

8000

576

Ship Fitter

8000

576

Electrician, Substation

6000

432

Shipwright

8000

576

Electronic Technician

8000

576

Surveyor Assistant, Instrument

4000

288

Financial Management

2000

144

Telecommunication Technician

8000

576

Geospatial Specialist

4000

288

Treatment Plant Mechanic

6000

432

Graphic Designer

3000

216

Truck Driver, Heavy

2000

144

Heating & Air Condition Installer Servicer

6000

432

Water Treatment Plant Operator

6000

432

Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic

8000

576

Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator

4000

288

Information Management

2000

144

Welder

6000

432

Early Middle College

Early Middle College

Program Mission and Description

GCC’s Early Middle College is a program that provides secondary students the opportunity to obtain postsecondary education and accelerate their job training to become skilled workers.  EMC students will take college courses identified in their career pathway with their required high school courses to earn stackable credentials.  EMC students will participate in wraparound services to support their academic needs and to overcome social and economic barriers unique to their population. These wraparound services will also focus on EMC students’ transition into the college-level mindset and their employability after graduation.  This program prepares EMC graduates to be skillful, ethical, and professional for entry-level positions with a certificate of mastery, program certificate or associates degree, and other certifications related to their identified career pathway.   

For secondary students, a portion of the requirements will be provided by the Dual Credit Articulated Programs of Study [DCAPS] and its Dual Enrollment Accelerated Learning [DEAL] program.  The DCAPS involves the (11) Career and Technical Education programs available in Guam’s six public high schools: Allied Health; Automotive; AutoCAD; Construction; Early Childhood Education; Electronics; Lodging Management Program (Tourism); Marketing; ProStart (Culinary); Telecommunications, and Visual Communication. Under DCAPS, students enrolled in the GCC CTE program will earn from three to 15 college credits in the corresponding GCC postsecondary program.  Under the DEAL program, eligible students are allowed to enroll in college math and English courses concurrently with high school classes and to receive both high school and college credit simultaneously.  Upon successful completion of these college course(s), the student will receive credit for the corresponding high school course AND receive college credit. The career pathway identified below addresses the community need for skilled workers in Guam’s construction industry as well as infrastructure technology (IT).


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of this program, students will be able to:
  1. Transition into the postsecondary environment earning college credentials leading to employment.    
  2. Utilize skills necessary for entry-level positions in the identified career pathway.
  3. Demonstrate soft skills to be marketable and employable in an ever-changing workforce setting.   


 

Certificate in Construction Technology Carpentry

Semester Term

High School DCAPS

DCAPS Equivalency

After High School Courses

10th Grade Fall

CTCT053-1A
Introduction to Carpentry

CT153 (3) + CT173 (3) + CT140 (3)

Reach for College Workshop +
CT100 (3) Introduction to Construction Trades

10th Grade Spring

CTCT053-1B
Introduction to Carpentry

AE103 (3) Basic Blueprint Reading
HL130 (1) First Aid and Safety

Summer

 

AE121 (2) Technical Engineering Drawing I

11th Grade Fall

CTCT073-2A Carpentry

CT183 (3) Finishing

11th Grade Spring

CTCT073-2B Carpentry

CT154A (3) Masonry

Summer

 

Construction Elective (Any CE/AE/CT course not listed)

12th Grade Fall

 

MA094 (4) Math for Trades  

12th Grade Spring

 

CT292 (3) Construction Practicum

 

Certificate in Construction Technology Masonry

Semester Term

High School DCAPS

DCAPS Equivalency

After High School Courses

10th Grade Fall

CTCT053-1A
Introduction to Carpentry

CT153 (3) + CT173 (3) + CT140 (3)

Reach for College Workshop +
CT100 (3) Introduction to Construction Trades

10th Grade Spring

CTCT053-1B
Introduction to Carpentry

AE103 (3) Basic Blueprint Reading
HL130 (1) First Aid and Safety

11th Grade Fall

CTCT073-2A Carpentry

CT154A (4) Masonry Level I

11th Grade Spring

CTCT073-2B Carpentry

CT154B (4) Masonry Level II

Summer

 

Construction Elective (Any CE/AT/CT course not listed)

12th Grade Fall

 

MA094 (4) Math for Trades

12th Grade Spring

 

CT292 (3) Construction Practicum

 

Certificate in Construction Technology Reinforcing Metal Worker

Semester Term

High School DCAPS

DCAPS Equivalency

After High School Courses

10th Grade Fall

CTCT053-1A
Introduction to Carpentry

CT153 (3) + CT173 (3) + CT140 (3)

Reach for College Workshop +
CT100 (3) Introduction to Construction Trades

10th Grade Spring

CTCT053-1B
Introduction to Carpentry

AE103 (3) Basic Blueprint Reading
HL130 (1) First Aid and Safety

11th Grade Fall

CTCT073-2A Carpentry

CT154A (4) Masonry Level I

11th Grade Spring

CTCT073-2B Carpentry

CT196A (4) Fundamentals of Oxyacetylene Welding I

Summer

 

Construction Elective (Any CE/AT/CT course not listed)

12th Grade Fall

 

MA094 (4) Math for Trades

12th Grade Spring

 

CT292 (3) Construction Practicum

 

Certificate in Construction Technology Electricity

Semester Term

High School DCAPS

DCAPS Equivalency

After High School Courses

10th Grade Fall

CTCT053-1A
Introduction to Carpentry

CT153 (3) + CT173 (3) + CT140 (3)

Reach for College Workshop +
CT100 (3) Introduction to Construction Trades

10th Grade Spring

CTCT053-1B
Introduction to Carpentry

AE103 (3) Basic Blueprint Reading
HL130 (1) First Aid and Safety

Summer

 

CT165A(4) Electricity Level I

11th Grade Fall

CTCT073-2A Carpentry

CT165B(4) Electricity Level II

11th Grade Spring

CTCT073-2B Carpentry

CT165C(4) Electricity Level III

Summer

 

MA094 (4) Math for Trades  

12th Grade Fall

 

CT165D(4) Electricity Level IV

12th Grade Spring

 

CT292 (3) Construction Practicum

 

Certificate in Construction Technology Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC)

Semester Term

High School DCAPS

DCAPS Equivalency

After High School Courses

10th Grade Fall

CTCT053-1A
Introduction to Carpentry

CT153 (3) + CT173 (3) + CT140 (3)

Reach for College Workshop +
CT100 (3) Introduction to Construction Trades

10th Grade Spring

CTCT053-1B
Introduction to Carpentry

AE103 (3) Basic Blueprint Reading
HL130 (1) First Aid and Safety

11th Grade Fall

CTCT073-2A Carpentry

CT185A (5) Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Level I

11th Grade Spring

CTCT073-2B Carpentry

CT185B (5) Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Level II

Summer

 

MA094 (4) Math for Trades

12th Grade Fall

 

CT185C (5) Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Level III

12th Grade Spring

 

CT292 (3) Construction Practicum

 

Certificate in Construction Technology Plumbing

Semester Term

High School DCAPS

DCAPS Equivalency

After High School Courses

10th Grade Fall

CTCT053-1A
Introduction to Carpentry

CT153 (3) + CT173 (3) + CT140 (3)

Reach for College Workshop +
CT100 (3) Introduction to Construction Trades

10th Grade Spring

CTCT053-1B
Introduction to Carpentry

AE103 (3) Basic Blueprint Reading
HL130 (1) First Aid and Safety

11th Grade Fall

CTCT073-2A Carpentry

CT152 (4) Fundamentals of Plumbing

11th Grade Spring

CTCT073-2B Carpentry

CT152A(4) Plumbing Level I

Summer

 

MA094 (4) Math for Trades  

12th Grade Fall

 

CT182 (3) Uniform Plumbing Code

12th Grade Spring

 

CT292 (3) Construction Practicum

 

Certificate in Construction Technology Welding

Semester Term

High School DCAPS

DCAPS Equivalency

After High School Courses

10th Grade Fall

CTCT053-1A
Introduction to Carpentry

CT153 (3) + CT173 (3) + CT140 (3)

Reach for College Workshop +
CT100 (3) Introduction to Construction Trades

10th Grade Spring

CTCT053-1B
Introduction to Carpentry

AE103 (3) Basic Blueprint Reading
HL130 (1) First Aid and Safety

Summer

 

CT196A(4) Fundamentals of Oxyacetylene Welding I

11th Grade Fall

CTCT073-2A Carpentry

CT196B(4) Fundamentals of Oxyacetylene Welding I

11th Grade Spring

CTCT073-2B Carpentry

CT197A(4) Shielded Metal Arc Welding I

Summer

 

MA094 (4) Math for Trades

12th Grade Fall

 

CT197B(5) Shielded Metal Arc Welding II

12th Grade Spring

 

CT292 (3) Construction Practicum

 

Certificate in Computer Science

Semester Term

High School DCAPS

DCAPS Equivalency

After High School Courses

10th Grade Fall

CTTE101 Intro to Comp Systems and Info Tech

CS101 (3)
CS112 (3)
CS205 (4)
CS206 (3)
CS211 (3)
CS212 (3)
*One of the extra classes will count as a technical elective

Reach for College Workshop +
CS102 (3) Computer Operations

10th Grade Spring

CTTE102 Javascript Programming

CS110 (3) Introduction to the Internet

Summer

 

CS151 (3) Windows Application

11th Grade Fall

CTTE103 Java I

SM108 (3) Introduction to Business

11th Grade Spring

CTTE104 Python Programming

MA110A (3) Finite Mathematics

Summer

 

EN110 (3) Freshman Composition

12th Grade Fall

CTTE105 Intro to Linux

OA211 (3) Business Communication

12th Grade Spring

CTTE106 Network Communications

CS290/292 (3) Practicum/Project

 

Associate of Science in Computer Science

Semester Term

High School DCAPS

DCAPS Equivalency

After High School Courses

10th Grade Fall

CTTE101 Intro to Comp Systems and Info Tech

CS101 (3)
CS112 (3)
CS205 (4)
CS206 (3)
CS211 (3)
CS212 (3)

*One of the extra classes will count as a technical elective

Reach for College Workshop +
CS102 (3) Computer Operations
PY100 (3) Personal Adjustment

10th Grade Spring

CTTE102 Javascript Programming

CS110 (3) Introduction to the Internet
CS104 (3) Visual Basic Programming

Summer

 

CS151 (3) Windows Application
Humanities & Fine Arts (3-4)

11th Grade Fall

CTTE103 Java I

SM108 (3) Introduction to Business
CS203 (3) Systems Analysis & Design

11th Grade Spring

CTTE104 Python Programming

MA110a (3) Finite Mathematics
CS204 (3) C++ Programming

Summer

 

EN110 (3) Freshman Composition

12th Grade Fall

CTTE105 Intro to Linux

OA211 (3) Business Communication
Natural & Physical Science (4)

12th Grade Spring

CTTE106 Network Communications

CS299 (4) Capstone
CS213 (3) PHP Programming w/ MySQL

 

Certificate and Associate of Science in Computer Science

Semester Term

High School DCAPS

DCAPS Equivalency

After High School Courses

10th Grade Fall

CTTE101 Intro to Comp Systems and Info Tech

CS101 (3)
CS112 (3)
CS205 (4)
CS206 (3)
CS211 (3)
CS212 (3)

*One of the extra classes will count as an elective

Reach for College Workshop +
CS102 (3) Computer Operations

10th Grade Spring

CTTE102 Javascript Programming

CS110 (3) Introduction to the Internet

Summer

 

CS151 (3) Windows Application

11th Grade Fall

CTTE103 Java I

SM108 (3) Introduction to Business

11th Grade Spring

CTTE104 Python Programming

MA110A (3) Finite Mathematics

Summer

 

EN110 (3) Freshman Composition

12th Grade Fall

CTTE105 Intro to Linux

OA211 (3) Business Communication

12th Grade Spring

CTTE106 Network Communications

CS290/292 (3) Practicum/Project

 

Fall Semester After HS Graduation

Spring Semester After HS Graduation

CS104

Visual Basic Programming

3

CS299

Computer Science Capstone

4

CS203

Systems Analysis & Design

3

PY100

Social & Behavioral Science

3

CS204

C++ Programming

3

 

Humanities & Fine Arts

3-4

CS213

PHP Programming with MySQL

3

 

Natural & Physical Science

4

 

Summer - Semester 1

Fall - Semester 2

Spring - Semester 3

College Success Seminar to show students (but not limited to) how to study, take notes, fill out study packets, and manage time. This is to be taken before any college classes.

  • Sessions with Success Coach and Career Counselor (3 to 4 times a week) to provide support for academic and social needs within a cohort.
  • Tutoring Services as needed.
  • Social Emotional Learning activities embedded in the program
  • Sessions with Success Coach and Career Counselor (3 to 4 times a week) to provide support for academic and social needs within a cohort.
  • Tutoring Services as needed.
  • Social Emotional Learning activities embedded in the program

Summer - Semester 4

Fall - Semester 5

Spring - Semester 6

 

  • Sessions with Success Coach and Career Counselor (2 times a week) to provide support for academic and social needs within groups based on program of study.
  • Tutoring Services as needed
  • Social Emotional Learning activities embedded in the program
  • Work Experience Program
  • Sessions with Success Coach and Career Counselor (once a week) to provide support for academic and social needs within groups based on program of study.
  • Tutoring Services as needed
  • Social Emotional Learning activities embedded in the program
  • Work Experience Program

Summer - Semester 7

Fall - Semester 8

Spring - Semester 9

 

  • Sessions with Success Coach and Career Counselor (once biweekly) to provide support for academic and social needs within groups based on program of study.
  • Tutoring Services as needed
  • Social Emotional Learning activities embedded in the program
  • Paid Work Experience Program
  • Sessions with Success Coach and Career Counselor (once biweekly) to provide support for academic and social needs within groups based on program of study.
  • Tutoring Services as needed
  • Social Emotional Learning activities embedded in the program
  • Paid Work Experience Program

 

Certificate Programs

Graduation Requirements for Certificates

Upon successful completion of the requirements for graduation, the College will award the appropriate Certificate credential.

The student must indicate which year’s catalog requirements they choose to satisfy when submitting the Application for Degree, Certificate, or Diploma. It is the responsibility of the student to apply for any degree, certificate or diploma they have earned.

Students qualify for graduation once the following requirements are met:
 
  • Achieve a 2.0 cumulative GPA as an undergraduate student.
  • Meet individual certificate requirements, including major GPA (if applicable).
  • Fulfill residency requirements – at least 12-degree applicable credit hours of coursework completed at the College.
  • Successfully complete the program pertaining to their certificate.
  • Submit Application for Graduation to the Admissions & Registration Office by the applicable deadline and pay the graduation fee.
  • Meet financial obligations to the school.

NOTE:  A single course cannot be used to satisfy more than one course requirement in a program.
 

General Requirements for Certificates

Effective fall Semester 2003, several academic policy changes were implemented to ensure that students are adequately prepared to meet business and industry standards. All Undeclared or newly Declared Students enrolled in regularly scheduled postsecondary courses must be enrolled in or must have completed developmental coursework for Math and English or have successfully placed into post-secondary Math and English (or equivalent). 

Students must fulfill the English general education requirement by the time they have enrolled in 12 credits of classes. This means that students may take only nine (9) credits before they must begin meeting the general education requirements. All declared students in Certificate programs will be required to successfully complete minimum general education course requirements. For more information, refer to the Admissions Information, General Education Policy section of this catalog.

A. General Education Requirements
Students must demonstrate proficiency in reading, writing, understanding and speaking English as indicated by one of the following:
 
  • Test out of the English Placement Test (or equivalent), or
  • Satisfactory completion of EN096 or EN097 courses and
  • Test out of the Math Placement Test (or equivalent), or
  • Satisfactory completion of MA098 course
*Students in the Certificate of Construction Technology program can successfully complete their math requirements with MA094 Mathematics for the Trades in lieu of MA098 Intermediate Algebra.

B. Major Requirements. Total Major Requirements vary by program. Minimum Total Credits Required for a Certificate is 30 credits.

* No course may be counted for both Major and General Education requirements.
** Placement testing is not mandatory for admission to the College. Completion of placement testing or equivalent, however, is required for enrollment into English and mathematics courses. Therefore, students who plan to enroll full-time in a program should take the placement test to be eligible for a full load of courses.


A Statement on Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Program Student Learning Outcomes follow each program description in this catalog. SLOs intentionally describe the 3-5 central goals that students will have attained by the end of the program. In essence, SLOs encapsulate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that students are expected to learn from their respective programs. The focus is on what students can do with what they have learned and this outcome should be evaluated in some way. Primarily, three questions essentially frame the articulation of SLOs:

 
  • What do students know? (cognitive domain)
  • What do they think and value? (affective domain)
  • What can they do? (behavioral domain)

In this catalog, program SLOs describe the broadest goals for the program, particularly those that require higher-level thinking. They, therefore, require students to synthesize many discrete skills or areas of content. SLOs also ask students to produce artifacts such as term papers, projects, portfolios, demonstrations, exams or other student work. Most importantly, SLOs also need to be evaluated or assessed in some way so that accountability and improvement remain the hallmarks of a good program.  A separate SLO Booklet is published and updated (as needed) to guide faculty in helping students achieve articulated course outcomes.

The College, in close collaboration with faculty and members of Advisory committees, continues to embark on an ongoing institutional effort to revise and update all its curriculum documents so that they remain responsive to industry and community needs through well-articulated student learning outcomes.

Second Certificate or Degree and Multiple Tracks in Degree Programs

A second certificate and/or degree may be granted provided that a student completes all additional general education and major requirements. Some programs of study offer more than one track; a student may earn a degree, which includes more than one track so long as the student completes the requirements before the degree is conferred. 

Certificate in Automotive Service Technology

The Certificate program in Automotive Service Technology (AST) is a competency-based program designed to offer entry level training sufficient for employee success in automotive technician positions. Skills acquired in this program also apply directly to occupational areas including diesel mechanics, small engine repair, generator repair, marine engine service, fleet service, repair service order writing, and entry level automotive service management.

Graduates of the AST Certificate program demonstrate the foundational skill and knowledge to pursue further study in power plant mechanics, marine/diesel repair and automotive engineering in the automotive manufacturing industry.

Three ‘tracks’ exist within the program. Students completing the General Service Technician Track offer future employers preparatory background in four primary areas of automotive service technology (brakes, electrical/electronic systems, engine performance, and suspension/steering) and are prepared to pass the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) Certification Examination in those areas. Upon passing of the exam, and after one year of automotive industry work experience, they are eligible to receive NATEF designation as a General Service Technician. 

The second option within the Certificate program is the Master Service Technician track, where graduates receive preparatory background in the four above-mentioned automotive areas as well as four additional areas (automatic transmission/transaxle, engine repair, heating/air conditioning, and manual drive trains/axles). These graduates are prepared to pass the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) Certification Examination in all eight examination areas offered, and upon passing of the exam, they may pursue recognition from ASE as a Master Service Technician.

The final option with the Certificate program is the Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technician Track. This option provides an overview of the purpose of hybrid technology with an emphasis on safe operating practices when servicing both hybrid and non-hybrid systems. The Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technician Track comprises of theory and practicum. During labs, you will partake in demonstrations of disconnect procedures, safely testing high voltage systems, accessing scan tool data, conducting examinations of sub systems, and diagnostics of both electric and non-electric drive systems.


General Service and Master Service Technician Tracks Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Automotive Service Technology General Service Technician or Master Service Technician program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Identify the purposes and proper functioning of the core components of an automotive engine.
  2. Perform a cylinder compression cranking test.
  3. Demonstrate the proper use of a digital multimeter (DMM) during diagnosis of electrical circuit problems.
  4. Diagnose, adjust, repair, or replace automotive components.


Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technician Track Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Automotive Service Technology Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technician program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Perform high voltage disconnect procedure and reconnect/enable high voltage system.
  2. Describe the regenerative braking process.
  3. Diagnose problems caused by damaged or failed harnesses, connectors, and terminals.
  4. Explain the concept of an electric transaxle system.
 

General Service Technician Track

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

AST100

Introduction to Automotive Service

3

AST140

Suspension and Steering

3

AST150

Brake Systems I

3

AST160

Electrical/Electronic Systems

3

AST180A

Engine Performance I

3

AST180B

Engine Performance II

3

AST240

Theory/Practicum: Suspension & Steering

2

AST250

Theory/Practicum: Brakes

2

AST260

Theory/Practicum: Engine Performance

4

AST280

Theory/Practicum: Electrical/Electronic

5

Certificate Total

31

 

Master Service Technician Track

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

AST100

Introduction to Automotive Service

3

AST110

Engine Repair

3

AST120

Automatic Transmission & Transaxle

3

AST130

Manual Drive Train & Axles I

3

AST140

Suspension and Steering

3

AST150

Brake Systems I

3

AST160

Electrical/Electronic Systems

3

AST170

Heating and Air Conditioning

3

AST180A

Engine Performance I

3

AST180B

Engine Performance II

3

AST210

Theory/Practicum: Engine Repair

3

AST220

Automotive Transmission and Transaxle II

3

AST230

Theory/Practicum: Manual Drive Train and Axles

2

AST240

Theory/Practicum: Suspension & Steering

2

AST250

Theory/Practicum: Brakes

2

AST260

Theory/Practicum: Engine Performance

4

AST270

Theory/Practicum: Heating and Air Conditioning

2

AST280

Theory/Practicum: Electrical/Electronic

5

Certificate Total

53

 

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technician Track

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

AST100

Introduction to Automotive Service Technology

3

AST110

Engine Repair

3

AST113

Hybrid Engines and Motor/Generators

4

AST120

Automatic Transmission & Transaxle

3

AST123

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Energy Management, Transaxles, and Batteries

4

AST133

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Belted Alternator Starter (BAS)

4

AST160

Electrical and Electronic Systems

3

AST180A

Engine Performance I

3

AST180B

Engine Performance II

3

AST260

Theory/Practicum: Electrical and Electronic Systems

4

Certificate Total

34

 

Certificate in Computer Aided Design & Drafting

Computer Aided Design and Drafting (CADD) systems are used by drafters to prepare electronic drawings that can be viewed, printed, or programmed directly into automated manufacturing systems. Although this system is extensively used by drafters, they also need knowledge of traditional drafting techniques in order to fully understand and explain concepts. The Certificate in Computer Aided Design and Drafting (CADD) program is designed to provide knowledge and skills required for employment as an assistant draft craftsperson. The Certificate in CADD is an area emphasized in the Architecture & Construction Career cluster, one out of 16 career clusters in Career & Technical Education.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Computer Aided Design & Drafting program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Demonstrate knowledge and skills needed to design and draft projects ranging from two to three dimensional designs for commercial and residential buildings.
  2. Demonstrate basic skills needed to view, print, edit, and create variations of two and three dimensional electronic designs.
  3. Develop a professional work ethic needed in the architectural engineering industry.
 

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

Course

Course Name

Credits

AE103

Basic Blueprint Reading

3

AE121

Technical Engineering Drawing I

3

AE122

Technical Engineering Drawing II

3

AE138

Building Codes, Specs & Construction Management

3

AE150

Computer Aided Drafting I (CAD I)

3

AE160

Computer Aided Drafting II (CAD II)

3

CE215

Construction Procedures

3

CE225

Construction Planning & Estimating

3

CS101

Introduction to Computer Systems & Information Technology

3

MA110A

Finite Mathematics

3

MA161A

College Algebra & Trigonometry I

4

Choose 1 course from the following

CE121

Properties of Materials

3

AE170

Revit Architecture Essentials

Certificate Total

40-41

 

Certificate in Computer Science

The Certificate in Computer Science will provide opportunities for students to work as entry-level programmers who provide technical support to systems analysts and coders. These computer skills are in high demand in the rapidly evolving information technology field.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Computer Science program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Write codes using appropriate programming language to implement solutions.
  2. Diagnose computer-based glitches and derive possible solutions.
  3. Demonstrate a solid foundation in the core areas of computer science.
 

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA115

Fundamentals of College Algebra

3

CS101

Introduction to Computer Systems & Information Technology

3

CS104

Visual Basic Programming

3

CS112

Introduction to Linux   

3

CS203

Systems Analysis and Design   

3

CS205

Network Communications 

4

CS206

Java I   

3

CS211

JavaScript Programming     

3

CS212

Python Programming

3

Electives (Complete 3-4 Credits)

Course

Course Name

Credits

CSXXX

Any Computer Science course not listed in the Major Requirements

3-4

Certificate Total

31-32

 

Certificate in Construction Technology

The Certificate in Construction Technology Program will prepare students for the current local and global job market with entry-level skills needed for any of the following fields: carpentry; electricity; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC); masonry; plumbing; reinforcing metal worker; and welding. All students must successfully pass four (4) core courses (technical related requirements) with a “C” or better before enrolling in one (1) of the seven (7) concentration areas.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Construction Technology program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Demonstrate basic skills needed to function as an entry-level worker in at least one construction trades concentration area in accordance with industry safety standards: carpentry; electricity; heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC); masonry; plumbing; reinforcing metal worker; or welding.
  2. Exhibit entry-level knowledge in chosen construction trades concentration area.
  3. Demonstrate professionalism as related to the construction trades industry.
 

Carpentry Track

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

AE103

Basic Blueprint Reading

3

AE121

Technical Engineering Drawing I

3

CT100

Introduction to Construction Trades

3

CT140

Industrial Safety

3

CT153

Introduction to Carpentry

3

CT154A

Masonry Level I

4

CT173

Rough Framing and Exterior Finishing

3

CT292

Construction Practicum

3

HL130

First Aid & Safety

1

 

Construction Elective - Any CE/AE/CT course not listed

4

Certificate Total Minimum

30

 

Welding Track

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

AE103

Basic Blueprint Reading

3

CT100

Introduction to Construction Trades

3

CT140

Industrial Safety

3

CT196A

Fundamentals of Oxyacetylene Welding I

4

CT196B

Fundamentals of Oxyacetylene Welding II

4

CT197A

Shielded Metal Arc Welding I

5

CT197B

Shielded Metal Arc Welding II

5

CT292

Construction Practicum

3

HL130

First Aid & Safety

1

 

Construction Elective - Any CE/AE/CT course not listed

3

Certificate Total Minimum

34

 

Plumbing Track

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

AE103

Basic Blueprint Reading

3

CT100

Introduction to Construction Trades

3

CT140

Industrial Safety

3

CT152

Fundamentals of Plumbing

4

CT152A

Plumbing Level I

4

CT182

Uniform Plumbing Code

3

CT292

Construction Practicum

3

HL130

First Aid & Safety

1

 

Construction Elective - Any CE/AE/CT course not listed

6

Certificate Total Minimum

30

 

Electricity

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

AE103

Basic Blueprint Reading

3

CT100

Introduction to Construction Trades

3

CT140

Industrial Safety

3

CT 165A

Electricity Level I

4

CT 165B

Electricity Level II

4

CT 165C

Electricity Level III

4

CT 165D

Electricity Level IV

4

CT292

Construction Practicum

3

HL130

First Aid & Safety

1

 

Construction Elective - Any CE/AE/CT course not listed

3

Certificate Total Minimum

32

 

Heating, Ventilation, and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) Track

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

AE103

Basic Blueprint Reading

3

CT100

Introduction to Construction Trades

3

CT140

Industrial Safety

3

CT185A

Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Level I

5

CT 185B

Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Level II

5

CT185C

Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Level III

5

CT292

Construction Practicum

3

HL130

First Aid & Safety

1

 

Construction Elective - Any CE/AE/CT course not listed

3

Certificate Total Minimum

31

 

Reinforcing Metal Worker

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

AE103

Basic Blueprint Reading

3

CT100

Introduction to Construction Trades

3

CT140

Industrial Safety

3

CT153

Introduction to Carpentry

3

CT154A

Masonry Level I

4

CT196A

Fundamentals of Oxyacetylene Welding I

4

CT292

Construction Practicum

3

HL130

First Aid & Safety

1

 

Construction Elective - Any CE/AE/CT course not listed

3

 

Construction Elective - Any CE/AE/CT course not listed

3

Certificate Total Minimum

30

 

Masonry Track

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

AE103

Basic Blueprint Reading

3

CT100

Introduction to Construction Trades

3

CT140

Industrial Safety

3

CT153

Introduction to Carpentry

3

CT154A

Masonry Level I

4

CT 154B

Masonry Level II

4

CT292

Construction Practicum

3

HL130

First Aid & Safety

1

 

Construction Elective - Any CE/AE/CT course not listed

3

 

Construction Elective - Any CE/AE/CT course not listed

3

Certificate Total Minimum

30

 

Certificate in Criminal Justice

The Certificate in Basic Law Enforcement was initially developed when Guam Community College was created by Public Law 14-77 and the responsibility for police basic training was transferred from the University of Guam to Guam Community College. Presently, it continues to be the required curriculum for all territorial law enforcement academy cycles.
The first substantive revision was made in February 2011, which was made upon the Criminal Justice Advisory Committee request to realign the Certificate Program and the Criminal Justice Associate Degree Program. It also addressed new general education core requirements to commence fall Semester 2003. The second substantive revision created a new area of concentration in Marine & Terrestrial Conservation Enforcement.  Students may now elect to graduate with a Certificate in Criminal Justice in either the Law Enforcement Track or Marine & Terrestrial Conservation Enforcement Track.
Course requirements may identify prerequisite that must be completed with a passing grade. Prerequisite course credits are not counted as credits earned towards the program unless they are certificate core course requirements. 


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Criminal Justice program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Identify the legal procedures for gathering information about crimes, criminal procedure, and defendants’ rights.
  2. Describe the process of the criminal justice system and the duties and responsibilities of the criminal justice professional.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to understand the interrelations, ethics, and role expectations of the criminal justice professional in society.

 

Law Enforcement Administration Track

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

CJ100

Introduction to Criminal Justice

3

CJ102

First Responder

3

CJ126

Officer Survival

3

CJ126L

Officer Survival Laboratory

1

CJ132

Emergency Vehicle Operator Course (EVOC)

3

CJ135

Firearms Use/Safety/Care

3

CJ150

Criminal Procedure

3

CJ200

Criminal Law

3

CJ205

Police Report Writing

3

CJ225

Criminal Investigation

3

PY125

Interpersonal Relations

3

Certificate Total

31

 

Marine & Terrestrial Conservation Enforcement Track

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

CJ100

Introduction to Criminal Justice

3

CJ102

First Responder

3

CJ122/SI122

Introduction to Forensic Science or Introduction to Forensic Science

4

CJ126

Officer Survival

3

CJ126L

Officer Survival Laboratory

1

CJ132

Emergency Vehicle Operator Course (EVOC)

3

CJ135

Firearms Use/Safety/Care

3

CJ150

Criminal Procedure

3

CJ200

Criminal Law

3

CJ205

Police Report Writing

3

CJ225

Criminal Investigation

3

CJ292

Criminal Justice Practicum

3

SI120

Introduction to Island Ecology and Resource Management

3

Certificate Total

38

 

Certificate in Early Childhood Education

Early childhood educators and caregivers work in Head Start programs, childcare centers, family home care programs, elementary schools, social services programs, and health care services. These professionals plan and implement appropriate experiences for young children in areas such as language, health, movement, creativity, thinking, problem solving, self-concept and social behavior. They also supervise children's activities, care for their needs, keep records of their progress, and confer with parents and other professionals.

The Certificate in Early Childhood Education is closely aligned with national standards and meets Head Start requirements for classroom aides. Only technical requirement courses that have a grade of "C" or better will be counted towards the Certificate.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Early Childhood Education program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Advocate appropriate practices for children, model professionalism, and demonstrate ethical conduct based on guidelines from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).
  2. Effectively and respectfully communicate with students, staff and families including those from diverse backgrounds and special populations.
  3. Implement various developmentally and age-appropriate teaching, assessment and guidance strategies needed to effectively work with young children from birth to age eight.

The Certificate in Early Childhood Education CDA Track is closely aligned with national standards and meets Head Start requirements for classroom personnel. As part of this program there is an option for students to earn a 'stackable' internationally recognized credential, the Child Development Associate (CDA) Credential.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Early Childhood Education Child Development Associate (CDA) program, students will be able to:
 
  1. To advocate appropriate practices based on the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).
  2. To effectively and respectfully communicate with children, staff and families from diverse backgrounds and special populations.
  3. To implement developmentally and age-appropriate teaching needed to effectively work with children birth to age five.
To prepare students to obtain the nationally recognized Child Development Associate (CDA) credential.

 

Early Childhood Education Track

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

CD140

Environments for Young Children

3

CD180

Language Arts in Early Childhood

3

CD240

Cognitive & Creative Development in Early Childhood

3

CD260

Social & Emotional Development

3

CD292

ECE Practicum

3

ED231

Introduction to Exceptionalities

3

Choose 1 course from the following

CD221

Child Growth & Development

3

ED220

Human Growth & Development

Choose 1 course from the following

CD110

Early Childhood Education Orientation

3

ED150

Introduction to Teaching

Elective Requirement

Course

Course Name

Credits

 

Education based elective

3

 

Education based elective

3

Certificate Total

30

 

Early Childhood Education Child Development Associate (CDA) Track

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

CD110

Early Childhood Education Orientation

3

CD140

Environments for Young Children

3

CD180

Language Arts in Early Childhood

3

CD221

Child Growth and Development

3

CD260

Social and Emotional Development

3

CD285

Childcare Management

3

CD293

Child Development Associate (CDA) Practicum

12

Certificate Total

30

 

Certificate in Education

The Certificate in Education program is designed to provide entry- level training for persons interested in working in educational settings. The program also serves as a career/educational ladder for those interested in pursuing a Bachelor’s degree in the field. Emphasis is placed on student learning outcomes in a broad range of educational areas. All courses taken for the Certificate in Education also fulfills the requirements for the Associate of Arts in Education degree. Only technical requirement courses that have a grade of “C” or better will be counted towards the Certificate.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Education program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Advocate appropriate practices for students, model professionalism, and demonstrate proper ethical conduct.
  2. Effectively and respectfully communicate with students, staff and families including those from diverse backgrounds and special populations.
  3. Implement various developmentally and age-appropriate teaching, assessment and guidance strategies needed to effectively work with students in Kindergarten to twelfth grade.
 

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

ASL100

American Sign Language I

4

ED150

Introduction to Teaching

3

ED180

Educational Methods

3

ED231

Introduction to Exceptionalities

3

ED292

Education Practicum

3

HI121

World Civilization (Pre-historic Time to 1500)

3

HL202

Nutrition

3

PS140

American Government

3

ED220

Human Growth & Development

3

ED265

Culture & Education in Guam

3

Certificate Total

31

Certificate in Emergency Management

Emergency Management graduates will be able to apply basic emergency management skills in the event of natural and manmade disasters. Graduates will be able to implement the four major areas of emergency management, namely, mitigation, preparation, response, and recovery. The Emergency Management program utilizes the Emergency Management Institute’s Independent Study (IS) courses to prepare graduates to apply leadership skills, to communicate effectively, to solve problems, to plan, to work as a team, to operate within the legal system and governmental framework for emergency management, to analyze risks and hazards, and to manage resources efficiently.

Guam Community College is mirroring Frederick Community College’s model whereby college credits are granted upon successful completion of Emergency Management Institute’s (EMI) Independent Study (IS) courses online. Students who have completed these IS courses will need to request for an official transcript from EMI then apply for college credits at Guam Community College towards a Certificate in Emergency Management.

The Emergency Management Program’s Major Requirements are adopted and derived from EMI’s Independent Study program. These courses are subject to revision and new courses will be added to the program. GCC’s Emergency Management program will adhere to the latest IS offerings to ensure that students learn what is relevant and most up-to-date information and skills.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Emergency Management program, students will be able to:
 
  1. State the government’s role in Emergency Management.
  2. Describe the function of the Emergency Operations Center and National Incident Management System.
  3. Evaluate hazards and risks in emergency situations.
  4. Make decisions, solve problems, and use critical thinking skills vis-a-vis the emergency planning process.

Note: Students declaring this major in AY 2021-2022 will enter a revamped and revised program.

 

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

Course

Course Name

Credits

PS140

American Government

3

HL130

First Aid & Safety

1

EMI154

Community Emergency Response Team

1

MA094

Mathematics for the Trades

4

Choose 19 courses from the following:

EMI100

Emergency Manager

1

EMI102

Hazardous Materials

1

EMI104

A Citizen’s Guide to Disaster Assistance

1

EMI106

Building for the Earthquakes of tomorrow

1

EMI108

Orientation to Disaster Exercise

1

EMI110

Exercise Design

1

EMI112

State Disaster Management

1

EMI114

Principles of Emergency Management

1

EMI116

Emergency Planning

1

EMI118

Leadership & Influence

1

EMI120

Decision Making & Problem Solving

1

EMI122

Effective Communication

1

EMI124

Developing & Managing Volunteers

1

EMI126

Anticipating Hazardous Weather

1

EMI128

Emergency Operations Center Role

1

EMI130

Volunteer Agencies in Emergency Management

1

EMI132

Disaster Basics

1

EMI134

Community Hurricane Preparedness

1

EMI136

Hazardous Material Prevention

1

EMI138

Multi-hazard Emergency Planning for Schools

1

EMI140

Introduction to Mitigation

1

EMI142

Protecting your Home and Small Business from Disaster

1

EMI144

Introduction to Public Assistance

1

EMI146

Debris Operation

1

EMI148

Incident Command System

1

EMI150

National Incident Management System

1

EMI152

National Response Plan & Disaster Medical System

1

Certificate Total

31-32

Certificate in Environmental Technician

This Certificate in Environmental Technician is designed to provide entry-level training for those interested in supporting environmental services. Emphasis is placed on developing field skills as well as competencies in basic science and math content for technical work. The program will serve as a career or educational ladder for students interested in interdisciplinary environmental studies.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Environmental Technician program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Demonstrate professionalism and ethical conduct within disciplines in the environmental field.
  2. Demonstrate interdisciplinary knowledge and skills needed to effectively work in the environmental field.
  3. Demonstrate proficiency in technical methods and data handling and processing methodology.
 

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

Choose 1 course from the following

EN___

English Requirement

3-4

Choose 1 course from the following

MA110A

Finite Mathematics

3-4

MA161A

College Algebra & Trigonometry I

MA161B

College Algebra & Trigonometry II

Course

Course Name

Credits

SI101

Introduction to Chemistry

3

SI101L

Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory

1

SI105

Introduction to Physical Geology

3

SI105L

Introduction to Physical Geology Laboratory

1

SI125

Scientific Methods and Data Analysis

3

SI155

Waste Site Worker Safety HAZWOPER

3

SU250

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

3

Biological Sciences (Choose 2 - Lecture and 2 respective Labs for 8 credits total)

SI103

Introduction to Marine Biology

3

SI103L

Introduction to Marine Biology Laboratory

1

SI110

Environmental Biology

3

SI110L

Environmental Biology Laboratory

1

SI150

Introduction to Microbiology

3

SI150L

Introduction to Microbiology Laboratory

1

Certificate Total

31-33

Certificate in Family Services


The Certificate in Family Services program is designed to provide entry level training for paraprofessionals providing human services to families.  Emphasis is placed on developing competencies for the effective delivery of human services.

Course requirements may identify a pPrerequisite that must be completed with a passing grade. Prerequisite course credits are not counted as credits earned towards the program unless they are certificate core course requirements. Prerequisite are identified in the course description section of this catalog and below with a + sign next to each course with a prerequisite.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Family Services program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Demonstrate effective communication skills with clients and co-workers.
  2. Demonstrate appropriate competency needed in the effective delivery of human services.
  3. Demonstrate professionalism and ethical conduct within the field.
 

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

Course

Course Name

Credits

PY120

General Psychology

3

SO130

Introduction to Sociology

3

HM110

Introduction to Community Services

3

FA192

Family Services Practicum

3

HM201

Social Welfare:  A World View

3

Choose 1 course from the following

ED220

Human Growth and Development

3

CD221

Child Growth and Development

Choose 3 Courses from the following

ASL100

American Sign Language I

4

ASL110

American Sign Language II

4

CD260

Social & Emotional Development

3

CJ100

Introduction to Criminal Justice

3

CJ101

Juvenile Justice Process

3

CJ104

Dynamics of Substance Abuse

3

CS151

Windows Applications

3

ED231

Introduction to Exceptionalities

3

CO125

Introduction to Human Communication and Speech

3

HL202

Nutrition

3

HU120

Pacific Cultures

3

OA101

Keyboarding Applications

3

Certificate Total

30-33

Certificate in Fire Science Technology

It is the mission of the Fire Science Technology program to prepare, educate, and train students for a career in firefighting. The certificate program in Fire Science Technology is not open to the general public. It is a competency-based academy program designed to offer entry-level training for fire recruits. Students who wish to attend the GCC Fire Academy should first obtain employment with the Guam Fire Department or any other Pacific Basin fire department that sends recruits to the GCC Fire Academy for basic training.

Course requirements may identify a pPrerequisite that must be completed with a passing grade. Prerequisite course credits are not counted as credits earned towards the program unless they are certificate core course requirements. Prerequisites are identified in the course description section of this catalog and below with a + sign next to each course with a prerequisite.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Fire Science Technology, students will be able to:
 
  1. Understand the current tactics used by fire personnel for suppression and prevention of fires, the operations and role of fire personnel, and the functions of fire service within the community.
  2. Analyze and apply the theories, techniques, and methods of basic fire and rescue.
  3. Demonstrate the techniques required for fire safety and prevention, to work as a team, and to respond to a variety of emergency situations.
 

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

FS100

Introduction to Fire Protection 

3

FS101

Introduction to Fire Suppression 

3

FS102

Fire Service on Guam

3

FS103

Firefighter I  

8

FS104

Firefighter II  

3

FS105

Fire Prevention 

3

FS107

Report Writing for The Fire Service 

3

EMS103

Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)

8

Certificate Total

34

Certificate in Medical Assisting

The Certificate in Medical Assisting provides students with foundational knowledge and skills to enter the workforce as allied health professionals. Medical Assistants are the only allied health professionals specifically trained to work in ambulatory settings, such as physicians’ offices, clinics, and group practices. These multi- skilled personnel can perform administrative and clinical procedures. Once a student from the Guam Community College has successfully completed the Medical Assisting Program, he or she will be prepared to take the Registered Medical Assistant (RMA) national certification examination through American Medical Technologists (AMT). The Guam Community College is an affiliated partner with the American Medical Technologist (AMT). 

Students must successfully complete the following courses in order to be placed in a Medical Assisting Cohort:
 
  • EN110 – Freshman Composition (3) 
  • MS101 - Introduction to Medical Assisting (3) 
  • HL190 Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology for Allied Health Professionals (4) 
  • Health clearance to include physical and immunizations- PPD, with the addition of a Hepatitis B vaccine or declination form. 
  • Police and court clearance will be required prior to starting MS145.

Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Medical Assisting program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Assist the provider with clinical procedures.
  2. Navigate electronic health records systems and practice management software.
  3. Evaluate legal and ethical principles that affect the role of a medical assistant.
 

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

Course

Course Name

Credits

HL120

Medical Terminology

2

HL131

Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers

1

HL190

Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology for Allied Health Professionals

4

MS 125

Clinical Medical Assisting: Clinical

1

MS101

Introduction to Medical Assisting

3

MS120

Clinical Medical Assisting

2

MS121

Clinical Medical Assistant: Laboratory

2

MS140

Administrative Medical Assisting: Theory

2

MS141

Administrative Medical Assisting: Laboratory

2

MS145

Administrative Medical Assisting Clinical

1

MS160

Introduction to Pharmacology

1

MS161

Administration of Medications: Laboratory

1

MS180

Introduction to Clinical: Laboratory

2

MS210

Medical Assisting Critique

1

MS292

Medical Assisting Practicum

5

Program Total

34-35

Certificate in Medium/Heavy Truck Diesel Technology

The Medium/Heavy Truck Diesel Technology program prepares graduates to work in the automotive field with special emphasis in diesel service. Graduates will be able to troubleshoot, maintain, and repair various types of diesel engines, trucks, boats, and other heavy equipment. Students will obtain knowledge and skills in Medium/Heavy Truck in a variety of areas to include: diesel engines; drive trains; brake systems; suspension and steering; heating, ventilation, air conditioning; hydraulics; electrical/electronic systems; and preventive maintenance.

Students completing this program will have preparatory knowledge in the eight main areas of the Medium/Heavy Truck Diesel Technology and will prepare them for entry-level Assistant Technician positions. This program prepares graduates to pass the ASE National Certification Exams and enter the workforce as entry-level Junior Technicians.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Medium/Heavy Truck Diesel Technology program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Seek employment as a Heavy/Medium Truck Technician, Fleet Mechanic, Heavy Marine Diesel Technician, Generator Repair, Heavy Equipment Repair or Parts Counter person.
  2. Troubleshoot, maintain, and repair various heavy trucks and mobile equipment, including bulldozers, boats, cranes, road graders, farm tractors, and combines.
 

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

MHT100A

Intro to Diesel Technology and Preventive Maintenance Part I

3

MHT100B

Intro to Diesel Technology and Preventive Maintenance Part II

3

MHT110

Diesel Engines Part I

3

MHT120

Medium/Heavy Truck Drive Trains Part I

3

MHT130

Brake Systems Part I

3

MHT140

Suspension & Steering Part I

3

MHT150

Medium/Heavy Truck Heating, Ventilation, & Air Conditioning

3

MHT160

Hydraulics

3

MHT170

Medium/Heavy Truck Electrical/Electronic Systems Part I

3

MHT210

Diesel Engines Part II

3

MHT230

Brake Systems Part II

3

MHT270

Medium/Heavy Truck Electrical/Electronic Systems Part II

3

Certificate Total

36

Certificate in Office Technology

This program is designed to prepare the student for entry-through mid-level employment or may be used to update office technology knowledge and skills for job advancement in the business office.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Office Technology program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Obtain knowledge and skills in various computer applications so that they will be able to adapt to the technological needs of their respective organizations.
  2. Use previously learned skills and information to format and produce various office documents.
  3. Use and integrate several office applications
 

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

Course

Course Name

Credits

CS151

Windows Applications

3

OA101

Keyboarding Applications

3

OA103

Filing Systems

3

OA130

Information Processing

3

OA210

Database Management Systems

3

OA211

Business Communications

3

OA220

Spreadsheet Systems

3

OA230

Advanced Information Processing

3

OA250

Office Procedures

3

PY125

Interpersonal Relations

3

Electives

Choose 2 courses from the following

AC100

Fund Bookkeeping and Accounting

6

OA109

Business Math Using Excel

SM108

Introduction to Business

Certificate Total

39-40

Certificate in Sign Language Interpreting

The Certificate in Sign Language Interpreting is designed to train individuals to become Sign Language Interpreters and facilitators of communication for the Deaf. The program combines theoretical and practical learning experiences that will further develop the students’ linguistic knowledge and understanding of American Sign Language (ASL), as well as their awareness of Deaf culture.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Supervision and Management program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Demonstrate effective communication skills using American Sign Language (ASL).
  2. Demonstrate critical thinking and appropriate ethical responses required by the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf's (RID) Code of Professional Conduct.
  3. Display a non-biased attitude when working with the Deaf and Hard of Hearing through proper conduct.
 

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

ASL100

American Sign Language I

4

ASL110

American Sign Language II

4

ASL120

American Sign Language III

4

ASL130

American Sign Language IV

4

IN145

Vocabulary Development for Intercultural Development

3

IN170

Introduction to Interpreting

3

IN180

Ecology of Deafness

3

IN220

Voice to Sign Interpreting

3

IN292

Sign Language Interpreting Practicum

3

Certificate Total

31

Certificate in Supervision and Management

The Certificate in Supervision and Management program prepares students for entry-level and assistant management positions in supervision and management.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Supervision and Management program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Recall theory and principles related to supervisory principles and procedures.
  2. Demonstrate entry-level supervisory and management skill techniques in business operations.
  3. Demonstrate practical leadership decision-making based on sound business practice, experience, and judgment.
 

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

Course

Course Name

Credits

AC211

Accounting Principles I

4

EC110

Principles of Economics

3

SM108

Introduction to Business

3

SM208

Personnel Supervision

3

SM211

E-commerce Management

3

SM220

Management Skill Development

3

SM225

Leadership

3

SM230

Business Law Applications

3

SM245

Ethics &Stakeholders Management

3

Electives

Choose 1 course from the following

CS151

Windows Applications

3

CS152

Macintosh Applications

Certificate Total

34-35

Certificate in Surveying Technology

The Surveying Technology program prepares the student for immediate employment as a surveying or Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technician and teaches the student knowledge and skills that will enable one to adapt to ever evolving technical and technological changes in geospatial field and office applications. The graduate will be prepared to face the challenge of modern Surveying and GIS practice. The program emphasizes applications-based approaches and provides an overview of the geospatial fields of surveying, mapping, and GIS and prepares the student for further study and for the Level 1 Certified Survey Technician examination prepared by the American Society on Surveying and Mapping National Society of Professional Surveyors (ACSM-NSPS).


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the Certificate in Surveying Technology program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Demonstrate preparedness to enter productive technical positions in the geospatial fields of surveying, mapping, and Geographic Information Systems.
  2. Develop a professional work ethic needed in the surveying industry.
  3. Successfully pass the American Society on Surveying and Mapping National Society of Professional Surveyors (ACSM-NSPS) Level 1 Certified Survey Technician examination.
 

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

Course

Course Name

Credits

AE121

Technical Engineering Draw I

3

AE150

Computer Aided Drafting I (CAD I)

3

CE211

Plane Surveying I

3

CE222

Plane Surveying II

3

CS101

Introduction to Computer Systems & Information Technology

3

HL130

First Aid & Safety

1

MA161A

College Algebra & Trigonometry I

4

MA161B

College Algebra & Trigonometry II

4

SU100

Surveying Drafting

3

SU101

Surveying Problems I

3

SU230

Advanced Surveying

3

SU250

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

3

SU292

Surveying Practicum

1

Certificate Total

43

Associate Degree Programs

Degree Statement

Upon successful completion of the requirements for graduation, the College will award the appropriate Associate Degree.

Graduation Requirements for Associate Degrees

The student must indicate which year’s catalog requirements they choose to satisfy when submitting the Application for Degree, Certificate, or Diploma. It is the responsibility of the student to apply for any degree, certificate or diploma they have earned.
Students qualify for graduation once the following requirements are met:
 
  • Achieve a 2.0 cumulative GPA as an undergraduate student.
  • Meet individual program requirements, including major GPA (if applicable).
  • Fulfill residency requirements – at least 12-degree applicable credit hours of coursework completed at the College.
  • Successfully complete the program pertaining to their degree.
  • Submit Application for Graduation to the Admissions & Registration Office by the applicable deadline and pay the graduation fee.
  • Meet financial obligations to the school.

NOTE:  A single course cannot be used to satisfy more than one course requirement in a program.

General Requirements for Associate Degrees

Effective fall Semester 2003, several academic policy changes were implemented to ensure that students are adequately prepared to meet business and industry standards. All Undeclared or newly Declared Students enrolled in regularly scheduled postsecondary courses must be enrolled in or have completed EN110 Freshman Composition general education requirement by the time they have enrolled in 12 credits of classes. They must also enroll in or have completed MA110A Finite Mathematics (or higher) general education requirement by the time they have enrolled in 15 credits. This means that students may take only nine to eleven (9-11) credits before they must begin meeting the general education requirements. All declared students in Associate Degree programs are required to successfully complete minimum standardized general education course requirements. For more information, refer to the Admissions Information and General Education Policy section of this catalog.

All candidates for an Associate Degree at the College must meet the general requirements listed above. Course requirements may identify prerequisite that must be completed with a passing grade. Prerequisite course credit is not counted as credit earned towards the program unless it is an Associate Degree core course requirement. 
 

Second Certificate or Degree and Multiple Tracks in Degree Programs

A second certificate and/or degree may be granted provided that a student completes all additional technical, related technical and general education requirements. Some programs of study offer more than one track; a student may earn a degree, which includes more than one track so long as the student completes the requirements before the degree is conferred.

General Education Requirements

Recognizing the necessity for students to succeed in the complex and rapidly changing workplace, Guam Community College offers a general education curriculum that introduces students to major areas of knowledge and methods of inquiry. All degree programs require an interdisciplinary general education component that promotes the development of intellectual skills that enable students to become effective learners and informed citizens. Critical thinking, the use of language and computation, appropriate social skills, global awareness and respect for diverse opinions are among the learning outcomes provided in the general education requirements of each program.

Guam Community College believes that general education provides the academic foundation necessary for students to achieve their life goals. General education is intended to offer students a breadth of quality student learning experiences, encourage their respect for cultural heritage, promote their ethical and responsible social behavior and facilitate their life-long learning.

The General Education program strives to foster student learning and skill development in civic engagement, critical thinking, understanding of the relationship between the individual and society, information literacy, oral communication, quantitative reasoning, and written communication.

Guam Community College believes that high quality general education opportunities for all citizens are necessary for democratic principles and practices to exist and for a sound economy to flourish. The College continually scrutinizes the general education curriculum in order to assure that all degrees and certificates granted by the College support this vision of general education and that it serves as a means to inspire hope, opportunity and responsibility in all its constituencies.

Requirements for General Education follow the options described below. Students declared prior to fall 2010 will follow the requirements indicated in the applicable catalog in which they first declared their major program at the College.


Notes on General Education requirements

Students are advised to check the requirements for their specific programs before taking General Education courses.
Courses chosen to meet the general education requirements may not be used to meet the Major Requirements of a student’s specific degree program.

The list contains courses with pre-requisites, so students should make their choices carefully and thoughtfully. Students may consult a counselor or an academic advisor for guidance in choosing any of the course options listed. 

IMPORTANT NOTE: Some programs require different levels of coursework to meet General Education requirements, please review the individual programs for more information.
 

A Statement on Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Program Student Learning Outcomes follow each program description in the following pages. SLOs intentionally describe the 3-5 central goals that students will have attained by the end of the program. In essence, SLOs encapsulate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that students are expected to learn from their respective programs. The focus is on what students can do with what they have learned and this outcome should be evaluated in some way. Primarily, three questions essentially frame the articulation of SLOs:
 
  1. What do students know? (cognitive domain)
  2. What do they think and value? (affective domain)
  3. What can they do? (behavioral domain)

In this catalog, program SLOs describe the broadest goals for the program, particularly those that require higher-level thinking. They, therefore, require students to synthesize many discrete skills or areas of content. SLOs also ask students to produce artifacts such as term papers, projects, portfolios, demonstrations, exams or other student work. Most importantly, SLOs also need to be evaluated or assessed in some way so that accountability and improvement remain the hallmarks of a good program. A separate SLO Booklet is published and updated regularly to guide faculty in helping students achieve articulated course outcomes.

The College, in close collaboration with faculty and members of Advisory committees, continues to embark on an ongoing institutional effort to revise and update all its curriculum documents so that they remain responsive to industry and community needs.


SLO Mapping - ILO, PROGRAM, AND COURSE LEVELS

SLOs also align with collective program and institution level expectations for student learning translated into the curriculum and co-curriculum. Most importantly, these SLOs map to the curriculum, co-curriculum and other educational practices that provide students multiple opportunities for meaningful learning. SLO maps developed for three (3) different levels – ILOs, program, and course -- reflect the desired goals of learning experiences that the College continues to intentionally develop, structure, deliver, and evaluate on an ongoing basis.

 

GENERAL EDUCATION

Scope 1: Skills for and Application of Lifelong Learning

Freshman Composition (Choose one course from the following to meet the required 3-4 credits)

Course #

Course Name

Credits

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

EN111

Writing for Research

3

Mathematics (Choose one course from the following to meet the required 3-4 credits)*

Course #

Course Name

Credits

MA110A

Finite Mathematics

3

MA115

Fundamentals of College Algebra

3

MA161A

College Algebra & Trigonometry I

4

*Any college level math will be considered for the completion of this category

Literacy for Life Skills (Choose one course from the following to meet the required 3 credits)

Course #

Course Name

Credits

CO110

Critical Thinking for Civic Engagement

3

CS151

Windows Applications

CS152

Macintosh Applications

Scope 2: Broad Comprehension of the Development of Knowledge, Practice and Interpretation

Humanities & Fine Arts (Choose one course from the following to meet the required 3-4 credits)*

Course #

Course Name

Credits

ASL100

American Sign Language I

4

CH110

CHamoru I

4

ED265

Culture & Education in Guam

3

CO125

Introduction to Human Communication and Speech

3

EN210

Introduction to Literature

3

HI121

World Civilization (Pre-historic Time to 1500)

3

HI122

World Civilization (1500 to Present Time)

3

HI176

Guam History

3

HM110

Introduction to Community Services

3

HM201

Social Welfare & Development

3

HU120

Pacific Cultures

3

HU220

Guam Cultures & Legends

3

JA110

Japanese I

4

KE110

Korean I

4

PI101

Introduction to Philosophy

3

TH101

Introduction to the Theater

3

VC101

Introduction to Visual Communications

3

*Any foreign language, humanities, or fine arts course will be considered for the completion of this category

Natural & Physical Sciences (Choose one course and the corresponding lab from the following to meet the required 4 credits)**

Course #

Course Name

Credits

SI 101/101L

Introduction to Chemistry (3) & Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory (1)

4

SI 103/103L

Introduction to Marine Biology (3) & Introduction to Marine Biology Laboratory (1)

SI 105/105L

Introduction to Physical Geology (3) & Introduction to Physical Geology Laboratory (1)

SI 110/110L

Environmental Biology (3) & Environmental Biology Laboratory (1)

SI141

Applied Physics I

SI 150/150L

Introduction to Microbiology (3) & Introduction to Microbiology Laboratory (1)

SI131/131L

Human Anatomy & Physiology I (3) & Human Anatomy & Physiology I Laboratory (1)

SI132/132L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II (3) & Human Anatomy & Physiology II Laboratory (1)

**The exception to this would be SI141 which does not include a laboratory requirement

Scope 3: Preparation for and Acceptance of Responsible Participation in Civil Society

Social & Behavioral Sciences (Choose one course from the following to meet the required 3 credits)

Course #

Course Name

Credits

EC110

Principles of Economics

3

PS140

American Government

3

PY100

Personal Adjustment

3

PY120

General Psychology

3

PY125

Interpersonal Relations

3

SO130

Introduction to Sociology

3

CJ100

Introduction to Criminal Justice

3

WG101

Introduction to Women and Gender Studies

3

*Any social and behavioral science course will be considered for the completion of this category

Minimum General Education Requirements

19

 

Associate of Science in Accounting

The Accounting program will train individuals for employment in accounting fields and provide employees working in accounting-related fields the knowledge to upgrade job skills. Students are offered opportunities to experience learning environments through service learning that educate, empower, and enable students to be civically engaged—gaining skills that lead to participatory leadership, effective citizenship, and increased volunteerism.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Accounting program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Describe the steps of the accounting cycle using a computer-based program.
  2. Perform necessary procedures at each step of the accounting cycle for various types of business.
  3. Discuss skills needed to sustain careers in accounting.
 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

PI101

Introduction to Philosophy

3

CS151

Windows Applications

3

Social & Behavioral Sciences (Choose 1)

PY120

General Psychology

3

SO130

Introduction to Sociology

Natural & Physical Sciences (Choose 1)

SI103/SI103L

Introduction to Marine Biology& Lab

4

SI110/SI110L

Environmental Biology & Lab

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

AC110

Payroll Accounting

3

AC150

Federal Income Tax I

3

AC210

Intro to Financial Management

3

AC211

Accounting Principles I

4

AC212

Accounting Principles II

4

AC233

Accounting Using QuickBooks

3

EC110

Principles of Economics

3

OA211

Business Communication

3

OA220

Spreadsheet Systems

3

SM108

Introduction to Business

3

SM230

Business Law Applications

3

 

Major Requirements (Continued)

Course

Course Name

Credits

Accounting Electives (choose 2 courses from the following)

AC225

Hospitality Industry Accounting

6

AC240

Certified Bookkeeper Review

AC250

Federal Income Tax II

AC280

Personal Finance

AC292

Accounting Practicum

Program Total

60-61

 

Associate of Science in Automotive Service Technology General Service Technician

The Associate of Science program in Automotive Service Technology General Service Technician offers students both a comprehensive general education as well as advanced technical training in automotive systems to include: Brakes, Electrical/Electronics, Engine Performance, and Suspension & Steering. In addition, introductory training is provided in Automatic Transmission/Transaxle, Manual Transmission/Transaxle, and Engine Repair. 
Students enrolled in the program will receive instruction designed to prepare them to pass the four general service certification examinations administered by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE). Upon passage of examinations and after two years of automotive industry experience, students will receive ASE Certification in Electrical/Electronics, Engine Performance, Brakes, and Suspension and Steering.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Automotive Service Technology program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Identify the purpose and proper functioning of the core components of an automotive engine.
  2. Perform a cylinder compression cranking test.
  3. Demonstrate the proper use of a digital multimeter (DMM) during diagnosis of electrical circuit problems. 

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

EN___

English Requirement

3

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

SI___

Natural & Physical Sciences Requirement

4

 

Social & Behavioral Sciences Requirement

3

Computer Literacy (Choose 1)

CS151

Windows Applications

3

CS152

Macintosh Applications

Humanities & Fine Arts Requirement (Choose 1)

ASL100

American Sign Language I

4

JA110

Japanese I

CH110

CHamoru I

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

AST100

Introduction to Automotive Service

3

AST110

Engine Repair

3

AST120

Automatic Transmission and Transaxle

3

AST130

Manual Drive Train & Axles I

3

AST140

Suspension and Steering

3

AST180A

Engine Performance I

3

Course

Course Name

Credits

AST150

Brake Systems I

3

AST160

Electrical/Electronic Systems

3

AST180B

Engine Performance II

3

AST240

Theory/Practicum: Suspension & Steering

2

AST250

Theory/Practicum: Brakes

2

AST 260

Theory/Practicum: Engine Performance

4

AST 280

Theory/Practicum: Electrical/Electronic

5

Program Total

60-61

 

Associate of Science in Automotive Service Technology Master Service Technician

The Associate of Science program in Automotive Service Technology Master Technician offers students both a comprehensive general education as well as advanced technical training in all automotive systems to include: brakes; electrical/electronic; engine performance; suspension & steering; automatic transmission; manual transmission/transaction; engine repair; manual drive trains; and Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC). 
The primary program objective is to prepare students to pass all eight content area certification examinations administered by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE). Upon passage of examinations and after two years of automotive industry experience, students will receive ASE Certification as a Master Automobile Technician.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Automotive Service Technology program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Identify the purposes and proper functioning of the core components of an automotive engine.
  2. Test the performance of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system and perform corrective action.
  3. Demonstrate the proper use of a digital multimeter (DMM) during diagnosis of electrical circuit problems.
  4. Service components in the brake, steering, and suspension systems.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

EN___

English Requirement

3

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

SI___

Natural & Physical Sciences Requirement

4

 

Social & Behavioral Sciences Requirement

3

Computer Literacy (Choose 1)

CS151

Windows Applications

3

CS152

Macintosh Applications

Humanities & Fine Arts Requirement (Choose 1)

ASL100

American Sign Language I

4

JA110

Japanese I

CH110

CHamoru I

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

AST100

Introduction to Automotive Service

3

AST110

Engine Repair

3

AST120

Automatic Transmission & Transaxle

3

AST130

Manual Drive Train & Axles I

3

AST140

Suspension and Steering

3

AST150

Brake Systems I

3

AST160

Electrical/Electronic Systems

3

AST170

Heating and Air Conditioning

3

AST180A

Engine Performance I

3

AST180B

Engine Performance II

3

AST210

Theory/Practicum: Engine Repair

3

AST220

Theory/Practicum: Automotive Transmission and Transaxle

3

AST230

Theory/Practicum: Manual Drive Train and Axles

2

AST240

Theory/Practicum: Suspension and Steering

2

AST250

Theory/Practicum: Brakes

2

AST260

Theory/Practicum: Electrical/Electronic Systems

4

AST270

Theory/Practicum: Heating and Air Conditioning

2

AST280

Theory/Practicum: Engine Performance

5

Program Total

73-74

 

Associate of Science in Civil Engineering Technology

The Associate of Science in Civil Engineering Technology is a course of study that prepares students to analyze construction sites, use and maintain equipment, draft plans, and write reports. Technical requirement classes are designed to provide students with fundamentals in surveying, analyzing material strength, and structural drafting and design. This course of study will provide students with an overview of technical drawing, construction management and procedures, planning, and estimating. The student learning outcomes meet the professional standards of technicians in this field.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Civil Engineering Technology program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Properly use surveying equipment and tools and perform applications accordingly.
  2. Create a construction drawing set consisting of at least six sheets from a design.
  3. Perform basic techniques and skills using modern engineering tools in the current civil engineering industry.
  4. Sequence the steps related to the construction process in chronological order.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA161A

College Algebra & Trigonometry I

4

SI141

Applied Physics I

4

 

Social & Behavioral Science Requirement

3

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

AE121

Technical Engineering Drawing I

3

AE122

Technical Engineering Drawing II

3

AE138

Building Codes, Specifications & Construction Management

3

AE160

Comp Aided Design & Draft II

3

CE211

 Plane Surveying I

3

CE213

 Hydraulics

3

CE214

 Structural Design

3

CE221

 Strength of Materials

3

MA161B

College Algebra & Trigonometry II

4

OR101

 Introduction to Engineering Technology

3

SI142

Applied Physics II

4

Course

Course Name

Credits

CE121

 Properties of Materials

3

CE210

 Statics

3

CE215

 Construction Procedures

3

CE225

 Construction Planning & Estimating

3

EN194

 Technical Communication

3

Emphasis Courses (Optional)

CE222

 Plane Surveying II

3

CE224

 Highways

3

Program Total

64-71

 

Associate of Science in Computer Networking

The Associate of Science in Computer Networking is a program of study that prepares students for entry-level network technicians, computer technicians, and fiber and copper Cable Installers in the field of Information Technology (IT). Technical Requirement classes are designed to give students a firm foundation in the basics of computers, networking, and information systems. Elective courses allow the students to further specialize.
This course of study will provide students with a practical overview of Information Technology, including hands-on experience configuring networking devices, network management, and will enable students to prepare for and attain industry certification through ETA and Cisco Systems.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Computer Networking program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Install, configure, and repair computer networking systems.
  2. Pass local and national certification tests in computer repair, telecommunications, and network administration.
  3. Communicate the values of an effective and productive technician in the telecommunication and computer networking industry.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

EN___

English Requirement

3-4

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

SI110/SI110L

Environmental Biology (3) & Environmental Biology Laboratory (1)

4

PY125

Interpersonal Relations

3

VC101

Introduction to Visual Communications

3

CS151

Windows Applications

3

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

EE211

IT Essentials I

4

EE243

Fiber Optics Installation

3

EE283

Network Security +

3

EE265

Computer Networking I

5

EE266

Computer Networking II+

5

EE242

Principles of Voice and Data Cabling

2

EE267

Computer Networking III+

5

EE268

Computer Networking IV+

5

EE271

Advanced Computer Networking+

5

Computer Networking Electives (Choose 2)

Course

Course Name

Credits

EE131

Server

3

EE292

Practicum

3

CS112

Introduction to Linux

3

EE130

Project Management for IT

3

Program Total

62-63

 

Associate of Science in Computer Science

The Associate of Science in Computer Science will provide opportunities for students to work as system analysts who design computer systems for processing information, programmers who write instructions and translate them into a machine readable language, computer operators who monitor and control computer systems and retrieve results, and data entry personnel who enter information and instructions into the computer. 


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Computer Science program, students will be able to:
  1. Apply concepts and knowledge in the core areas of computer science.    
  2. Distinguish among basic networking systems, operating systems, and database structures.    
  3. Write code using programming languages, to include Java, Python, C++, PHP with MySQL and JavaScript.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

CS151

Windows Applications

3

 

Social & Behavioral Sciences Requirement

3

 

Humanities & Fine Arts Requirement

3-4

SI___

Natural & Physical Sciences Requirement

4

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

CS101

Introduction to Computer Systems & Information Technology

3

CS104

Visual Basic Programming

3

CS112

Introduction to Linux

3

CS203

Systems Analysis & Design

3

CS204

C ++ Programming

3

CS205

Network Communications

4

CS206

Java I

3

CS211

JavaScript Programming

3

CS212

Python Programming

3

CS213

PHP Programming with MySQL

3

CS299

Computer Science Capstone

4

OA211

Business Communication

3

Computer Science Elective (Choose 1)

OA210

Database Management Systems

3-4

EE211

IT Essentials

OA101

Keyboarding and Document Processing

Program Total

60-64

 

Associate of Science in Computer Science UOG Track

The Associate of Science in Computer Science UOG Track will provide the foundational knowledge and hands-on skills to prepare students to further their education at the University of Guam with a goal of earning a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science. Students will learn to design computer systems for processing information; work as programmers who write instructions and translate them into a machine readable language, computer operators who monitor and control computer systems and retrieve results, and data entry personnel who enter information and instructions into the computer. 


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Computer Science program, students will be able to:
 

  1. Apply concepts and knowledge in the core areas of computer science.    
  2. Distinguish among basic networking systems, operating systems, and database structures.    
  3. Write code using programming languages, to include Java, Python, C++, PHP with MySQL and JavaScript.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

CO110

Critical Thinking for Civic Engagement

3

 

Social & Behavioral Sciences Requirement

3

CO125

Introduction to Human Communication and Speech

3

SI___

Natural & Physical Sciences Requirement

4

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

CS101

Introduction to Computer Systems & Information Technology

3

CS104

Visual Basic Programming

3

CS112

Introduction to Linux

3

CS203

Systems Analysis & Design

3

CS204

C ++ Programming

3

CS205

Network Communications

4

CS206

Java I

3

CS211

JavaScript Programming

3

CS212

Python Programming

3

CS213

PHP Programming with MySQL

3

CS299

Computer Science Capstone

4

MA161A

College Algebra & Trigonometry I

4

MA161B

College Algebra & Trigonometry II

4

EN111

Writing for Research

3

OA211

Business Communication

3

 

Major Requirements (Continued)

Computer Science Elective (Choose 1)

OA210

Database Management Systems

3-4

EE211

IT Essentials

CS151

Windows Applications

Program Total

71-74

 

Associate of Science in Criminal Justice

This program is designed to address training requirements for students seeking employment as police officers, marshals, conservation officers, Guam Customs officers, investigators, corrections officers, forensic computer examiners, forensic lab technicians, and other public safety employees. Students may choose a track in one of four areas of concentration:
 

  1. Administration of Criminal Justice            
  2. Law Enforcement Administration
  3. Forensic Lab Technician                
  4. Forensic Computer Examiner


Some courses in this program must be sequenced because of prerequisite requirements. Other courses, including Mathematics and English, require placement testing before enrollment is granted. (See a Criminal Justice advisor before enrolling in this program or choosing electives.)


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Criminal Justice program, students will be able to:
 

  1. Identify the legal procedures for gathering information about crimes, criminal procedure, and defendants’ rights.
  2. Describe the process of the criminal justice system including the duties and responsibilities of the criminal justice professional as it pertains to one of the chosen concentration areas: Administration of CJ, Law Enforcement Administration, Forensic Lab Technician, or Forensic Computer Examiner.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to understand the interrelations, ethics, and role expectations of the criminal justice professional in society.

 

Administration of Criminal Justice Track

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

Natural & PhysicalScience Requirement (Choose 1)

SI 103/103L

Introduction to Marine Biology (3) & Introduction to Marine Biology Laboratory (1)

4

SI 110/110L

Environmental Biology (3) & Environmental Biology Laboratory (1)

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

CS151

Windows Applications

3

 

Humanities Requirement

3-4

PS140

American Government

3

Social Science Requirement (Choose 1)

PY120

General Psychology

3

SO130

Introduction to Sociology

3

PY125

Interpersonal Relations

3

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

CJ100

Introduction to Criminal Justice

3

CJ150

Criminal Procedure

3

CJ200

Criminal Law

3

CJ292

Criminal Justice Practicum

3

CJ206

Social Values & the Criminal Justice Process

3

 

Major Requirements (Continued)

Course

Course Name

Credits

CJ101

Juvenile Justice Process

3

CJ107

Introduction to Corrections

3

CJ204

Introduction to Criminology

3

CJ209

Concept of Police Operations

3

Electives

Course

Course Name

Credits

 

Related Major Course

3

 

Related Major Course

3

 

Related Major Course

3

Program Total

61-64

 

Law Enforcement Administration Track

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

 

Humanities Requirement

3-4

PS140

American Government

3

PY120

General Psychology

3

SO130

Introduction to Sociology

3

CS151

Windows Applications

3

Natural & PhysicalScience Requirement (Choose 1)

SI 103/103L

Introduction to Marine Biology (3) & Introduction to Marine Biology Laboratory (1)

4

SI 110/110L

Environmental Biology (3) & Environmental Biology Laboratory (1)

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

CJ100

Introduction to Criminal Justice

3

CJ150

Criminal Procedure

3

CJ200

Criminal Law

3

CJ205

Report Writing for Law Enforcement

3

CJ206

Social Values & the Criminal Justice Process

3

CJ209

Concept of Police Operations

3

CJ225

Criminal Investigations

3

CJ250

Police Organizational Theory

3

CJ292

Criminal Justice Practicum

3

Electives

Course

Course Name

Credits

 

Related Major Course

3

 

Related Major Course

3

 

Related Major Course

3

Program Total

61-64

 

Forensic Lab Technician Track

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

SI141

Applied Physics

4

PS140

American Government

3

PY120

General Psychology

3

SO130

Introduction to Sociology

3

CS151

Windows Applications

3

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

CJ100

Introduction to Criminal Justice

3

CJ122

Introduction to Forensic Science

4

CJ150

Criminal Procedure

3

CJ200

Criminal Law

3

CJ206

Social Values & the Criminal Justice Process

3

CJ225

Criminal Investigation

3

CJ292

Criminal Justice Practicum

3

HL120

Medical Terminology

2

MA161A

College Algebra & Trigonometry I

4

MA161B

College Algebra & Trigonometry II

4

SI131/131L

Human Anatomy & Physiology I (3) & Human Anatomy & Physiology I Laboratory (1)

4

SI150/150L

Introduction to Microbiology (3) & Introduction to Microbiology Laboratory (1)

4

SI101/101L

Introduction to Chemistry (3) & Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory (1)

4

Program Total

66-69

 

*MA161A College Algebra & Trigonometry I should be taken summer after year 1

 

Forensic Computer Examiner Track

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

SI110 or SI103

Natural & Physical Sciences Requirement

4

PS140

American Government

3

PY120

General Psychology

3

SO130

Introduction to Sociology

3

CS151

Windows Applications

3

 

Humanities Requirement

3-4

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

CJ100

Introduction to Criminal Justice

3

CJ150

Criminal Procedure

3

CJ200

Criminal Law

3

CJ292

Criminal Justice Practicum

3

CJ206

Social Values & the Criminal Justice Process

3

CJ122

Introduction to Forensic Science

4

CJ225

Criminal Investigation

3

CJ___

CJ Elective

3

EE211

IT Essentials I

4

CS101

Introduction to Computer Systems & Information Technology

3

CJ205

Report Writing for Law Enforcement

3

Approved Computer Science Courses

Course

Course Name

Credits

CS___

Computer Science Course 1

3

CS___

Computer Science Course 2

3

CS___

Computer Science Course 3

3

Program Total

69-72

 

Associate of Science in Early Childhood Education

Early childhood pertains to children age eight and below. Early childhood educators work in Head Start programs, childcare centers, family home care programs, elementary schools, social services programs, and health care services. These professionals plan and implement appropriate experiences for young children in areas such as language, health, movement, creativity, cognitive, self-concept and social behavior. They also supervise children’s activities, care for their needs, keep records of their progress, and confer with parents and other professionals.

The Associate of Science in Early Childhood Education is closely aligned with national standards and meets the education requirements for Basic Educator Preschool Certification from the Guam Commission for Educator Certification. The National Association for the Education of Young Children encourages a minimal educational level of an associate degree in early childhood education for early childhood program teachers. Only technical required courses that have a grade of “C” or better will be counted towards the Associate degree. 


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Early Childhood, students will be able to:
 

  1. Model appropriate practices for children, professionalism, and demonstrate ethical conduct based on guidelines from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).
  2. Communicate effectively with students, staff and families including those from diverse backgrounds and special populations.
  3. Implement various developmentally and age-appropriate teaching, assessment and guidance strategies needed to work with young children from birth to age eight.  

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

 

Literacy for Life Requirement

3

 

Social & Behavioral Sciences Requirement

3

 

Humanities & Fine Arts Requirement

3-4

SI___

Natural & Physical Sciences Requirement

4

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

CD140

Nutrition and Physical Health

3

CD180

Language Arts in Early Childhood

3

CD240

Cognitive & Creative Development in Early Childhood

3

CD260

Social & Emotional Development

3

ED231

Introduction to Exceptionalities

3

CD292

Early Childhood Education Practicum

3

Choose One

CD221

Child Growth & Development

3

ED220

 Human Growth & Development

 

Major Requirements (Continued)

Course

Course Name

Credits

Choose One

CD110

Intro to Early Childhood Education

3

ED150

Introduction to Teaching

Electives

 

Any college level course

3

 

Any college level course

3

 

Any college level course

3

 

Any college level course

4

 

Any college level course

4

Program Total

60-63

 

Associate of Science in Emergency Management

Emergency Management graduates will be able to apply basic emergency management skills in the event of natural and person-made disasters. Graduates will be able to implement the four major areas of emergency, namely, mitigation, preparation, response, and recovery. The Emergency Management program utilizes the Emergency Management Institute’s Independent Study (IS) courses to prepare graduates to apply leadership skills, to communicate effectively, to solve problems, to plan, to work as a team, to operate within the legal system and governmental framework for emergency management, to analyze risks and hazards, and to manage resources efficiently.

The Emergency Management program’s major requirements are adopted and derived from EMI’s Independent Study program. GCC’s Emergency Management program will adhere to the latest IS offerings to ensure that students learn what is relevant and most up-to-date information and skills. 

Approved college credits must be an approved EMI course and subject to the approval by the academic advisor or department chair. As such, Certificate and/or Associate degree students in EM must obtain prior approval by EM academic advisor or department chair.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Emergency Management program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Coordinate functions between local and federal law enforcement in response to disaster events.
  2. Analyze the functions of the Emergency Operations Center and National Incident Management System.
  3. Evaluate hazards and risks of emergency situations.
  4. Apply critical thinking skills during table top exercises

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

EN___

English Requirement

3-4

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

 

Literacy for Life Requirement

3

 

Humanities & Fine Arts Requirement

3-4

SI___

Natural & Physical Sciences

4

 

Social & Behavioral Sciences Requirement

3

 

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

CJ102

First Responder

3

CJ104

Dynamics Of Substance Abuse

3

CJ206

Social Values & The Criminal Justice Process

3

CJ292

Criminal Justice Practicum

3

EMI IS

Courses must be approved by advisor prior to completing online. Each course is equivalent to one (1) semester credit

29

Program Total

60-63

 

Associate of Science in Foodservice Management

Program Mission & Description

The Foodservice Management Program aligns with the National Restaurant Association (NRA) ManageFirst - a curriculum that is framed around a set of knowledge and skills identified by the restaurant industry as important for a successful career in the foodservice industry. By completing the NRA required 800-hour work experience, graduates have the option to earn the NRA ManageFirst Professional (MFP) or the Foodservice Management Professional (FMP) credential.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Foodservice Management program, students will be able to:
 

  1. Perform foodservice manager tasks within a complex work environment. 
  2. Manage resources to maintain fiscal responsibility as it relates to the foodservice industry. 
  3. Model a customer-oriented work ethic.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

EN___

English Composition Requirement

3-4

FSM145

Culinary Math

3

 

Literacy for Life Requirement

3

CO125

Introduction to Human Communication and Speech

3

SI___

Natural & Physical Sciences Requirement

4

PY125

Interpersonal Relations

3

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

FSM120

Food Safety and Sanitation

2

FSM100

Introduction to the Foodservice Profession

2

FSM110

Professional Dining Room Service: Theory

2

FSM110L

Professional Dining Room Service: Laboratory

1

FSM115

Purchasing and Receiving

2

FSM130

Professional Bar  and Alcohol Management

3

FSM154

Foodservice Nutrition

3

FSM155

Foodservice Accounting

3

FSM222

Foodservice Cost Control

3

FSM240

Menu Planning

3

FSM254

Foodservice Marketing

3

FSM270

Foodservice Human Resource Management

3

FSM292

Foodservice Practicum

4

FSM299

Foodservice Management Capstone

3

CUL140

Foundations of Cooking Part I

2

CUL160

Foundations of Cooking Part II

2

Program Total

60-61

 

Associate of Science in Human Services

The Associate of Science in Human Services program provides a multi-disciplinary, culturally diverse curriculum as the foundation for entry-level career pathway in the human services field.   The program prepares students with the knowledge and skills required for employment at entry level para-professional positions in human services, assisting social workers and other allied health professionals like counselors, psychologists, nurses and medical doctors.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Human Services program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Explain human service practice concepts and principles within a multidisciplinary, multi-cultural setting among children & family, mental health and disabilities, aging, substance abuse & the criminal justice system.
  2. Demonstrate entry level human services skills in human service settings.
  3. Describe human values and ethical responsibility pertaining to the human service worker.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

SO130

Introduction to Sociology

3

CS151

Windows Applications

3

SI110/110L

Environmental Biology/ Environmental Biology Laboratory

4

Choose One

ASL100

American Sign Language I

4

CH110

CHamoru I

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

HM110

 Introduction to Community Services

3

HM150

 Human Development Diversity

3

HM180

 Human Services Practicum Orientation

3

HM201

 Social Welfare and Development: Global Challenges

3

HM205

 Foundations of Case Management

3

HM225

 Substance Abuse Prevention

3

HM250

 Ethics and Values in Human Services

3

HM292

 Human Services Practicum

3

PY120

 General Psychology

3

Choose One

CD221

 Child Growth & Development

3

ED220

 Human Growth & Development

Electives (Complete 12 credits from the list below)

Course

Course Name

Credits

CJ100

 Introduction to Criminal Justice

3

CJ104

 Dynamics of Substance Abuse

3

VC101

 Introduction to Visual Communications

3

 

Electives (Continued)

Course

Course Name

Credits

TH101

 Introduction to the Theater

3

EN194

 Technical Communication

3

HL130

 First Aid & Safety

1

PY100

 Personal Adjustment

3

PY125

 Interpersonal Relations

3

HS152

 Customer Service

3

HU120

 Pacific Cultures

3

HU220

 Guam Cultures & Legends

3

Program Total

62-64

 

Associate of Science in International Hotel Management

The International Hotel Management Associate Degree prepares students in the hotel operational departments: Front Office, Housekeeping, Food & Beverage, and Human Resources. This program focuses on customer service and communications skills necessary to be successful as a hospitality professional. Training students in managerial, supervisory, and organizational skills is also emphasized.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in International Hotel Management program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Display various supervisory skills within the hospitality industry.
  2. Exhibit applicable customer service and hotel operations skills based on situation.
  3. Evaluate the importance of communications skills.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

EN___

English Requirement

3

 

Social & Behavioral Sciences Requirement

3

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

 

Literacy for Life Requirement

3

 

Humanities & Fine Arts Requirement

3-4

SI___

Natural & Physical Sciences Requirement

4

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

HS150

Welcome to Hospitality

3

HS152

Customer Service

3

HS155

 Basic Hotel & Restaurant Accounting

3

HS160

Hospitality Supervision

3

HS208

Managing Service in Food and Beverage Operations

3

HS211

Managing Front Office Operations

3

HS215

Managing Housekeeping Operations

3

HS216

Human Resources Management

3

HS217

Hotel Security Management

3

HS254

Hospitality & Travel Marketing

3

HS266

International Hotels: Development and Management

3

HS268

Managing Technology in the Hospitality Industry

3

HS292

Hospitality and Tourism Practicum

3

Choose One

KE110

Korean I

4

KE111

Korean II

Program Total

62-64


Note: The Committee on Substantive Change of the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges, Western Association of Schools and Colleges approved the Associate of Science in International Hotel Management on April 27, 2021.
 

Associate of Science in Marketing

The Associate of Science in Marketing provides students with the knowledge and skills required to obtain career-sustaining employment in a marketing profession. Among the many career opportunities in marketing are account executive, buyer, merchandiser, brand manager, retail supervisor, advertising assistant, market researcher, and social media marketing coordinator. The marketing program will equip students with the experience and technical skills necessary for rapid progression into mid-management positions.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Marketing program, students will be able to:
 

  1. Assess which marketing communication platforms will most effectively meet the needs of the marketplace.
  2. Design a strategic marketing plan for a new or existing business.
  3. Apply technical skills required to obtain career-sustaining marketing positions.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

EN___

English Requirement

3

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

CS152

Macintosh Applications

3

 

Humanities & Fine Arts Requirement

3-4

SI___

Natural & Physical Sciences Requirement

4

Social & Behavioral Science (choose 1)

SO130

Introduction to Sociology

3

PY120

General Psychology

PY125

Interpersonal Relations

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

MK123

Principles of Marketing

3

MK124

Selling

3

MK125

Social Media Marketing

3

MK205

Entrepreneurship

3

MK206

Retailing

3

MK208

International Marketing

3

Course

Course Name

Credits

MK224

Advertising

3

MK292

Marketing Practicum

3

VC101

Introduction to Visual Communications

3

VC125

Digital Graphics: Raster

3

VC126

Digital Graphics: Vector

3

VC128

Design Principles & Elements

3

VC212

Design Studio II

3

SM205

Purchasing

3

Program Total

61-63

 

Associate of Science in Medical Assisting

Medical Assistants are the only allied health professionals specifically trained to work in ambulatory settings, such as physicians’ offices, clinics, and group practices. These multi-skilled personnel can perform administrative and clinical procedures. Physicians value this unique versatility more and more, as managed care necessitates the need to contain costs and manage human resources efficiently. Medical Assistants are trained allied health professionals who work primarily in physicians’ offices, outpatient clinics, but also in hospitals, and other healthcare facilities. Medical Assistants are trained to perform clinical back office procedures and administrative tasks. In contrast to most other allied health professionals who work in inpatient hospital settings, Medical Assistants, work primarily in outpatient clinics under the direct supervision of a physician. One portion of his or her training that concentrates on administrative medical assisting provides suitable background for employment in health maintenance organizations, home health care organizations, and nursing homes. Their training as clinical medical assistants creates a well-rounded Medical Assistant that can perform a variety of tasks both administrative and clinical. The most common task performed by the medical assistant is recording patient history and personal information, measuring vital signs (such as blood pressure), helping the physician with patient examinations, giving patients injections or medications as directed by the physician, scheduling patient appointments, drawing and preparing blood samples for laboratory tests, and entering patient information into medical records. Once a student has successfully completed the Medical Assisting Program, he or she will be prepared to take the Registered Medical Assistant (RMA) national certification examination through American Medical Technologists (AMT). The Guam Community College is an affiliated partner with the American Medical Technologist (AMT).

10700 West Higgins Rd, Suite 150
Rosemont, IL 60018
Phone: 847.823.5169
Fax: 847.823.0458

With the exception of enrollment in MS101 Introduction to Medical Assisting, admission to the Medical Assisting program is required before enrollment in any Medical Assisting technical requirement course. Admission to the Medical Assisting program includes:
 
  • Advisement from Allied Health faculty.
  • Completion of English and Mathematics Placement Tests with minimum scores or completion of English and mathematics development courses and attainment of passing scores.
  • Health Clearance, which includes physical immunization (PPD, Hep B, 1, 2, 3).

Note: The student must have a “C” or better in all courses to receive a certificate in Medical Assisting. Students must pass each course with a “C” or better to continue toward the next course in the program. Those students who do not successfully complete a core technical of related technical requirement course will have to wait a minimum of one year for reentry. For further information, please refer to the Medical Assistant Program Handbook.

Pre-requisite courses are not required for program entry, but must be completed for approval for entry into the program learning group or cohort.  When the student enters the learning group, he/she will begin the Medical Assisting Program.
Other Prerequisite:
 
  • Health clearance to include physical and immunizations- PPD, with the addition of a Hepatitis B vaccine or declination form.
  • Police and court clearance will be required for acceptance into the Medical Assistant cohort.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Medical Assisting program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Describe legal and ethical principles that affect the role of a medical assistant.                          
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in administrative medical office procedures.
  3. Demonstrate proficiency in clinical procedures.
  4. Perform medical laboratory procedures.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

 

Literacy for Life Requirement

3

 

Humanities & Fine Arts Requirement

3-4

 

Social & Behavioral Sciences Requirement

3

HL190

Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology for Allied Health Professionals

4

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

HL120

Medical Terminology

2

HL131

Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers

1

HL150

Study of Diseases

3

HL201

Medical Law and Ethics

3

HL202

Nutrition

3

HL252

Pathology for Health Professions

3

MS 125

Clinical Medical Assisting: Clinical

1

MS101

Introduction to Medical Assisting

3

MS120

Clinical Medical Assisting: Theory

2

MS121

Clinical Medical Assistant: Laboratory

2

MS140

Administrative Medical Assisting: Theory

2

MS141

Administrative Medical Assisting: Laboratory

2

MS145

Administrative Medical Assisting: Clinical

1

MS160

Introduction to Pharmacology

1

MS161

Administration of Medications: Laboratory

1

MS180

Introduction to Clinical Laboratory

2

MS210

Medical Assisting Critique

1

MS220

Medical Assisting Specialties

3

MS225

Medical Assisting Specialties Clinical

1

MS292

Medical Assisting Practicum

5

Program Total

61-64

 

Associate of Science in Office Technology

The mission of the Office Technology program is to equip students with technology, communication, and professional skills necessary for successful employment in an office environment. Upon completion, the student will be able to perform as an office manager completing a variety of office processes, maintenance, and management, including oral and written communication; formatting simple to complex business correspondence; formatting reports; tables and administrative documents; filing; operating computers and business machines; using computer software application programs; distributing mail; answering the telephone; and providing good customer service.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Office Technology program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Obtain knowledge and skills in various computer applications so that they will be able to adapt to the technological needs of their respective organizations.
  2. Use previously learned skills and information to format and produce various office documents.
  3. Express confidence in their ability to use and integrate several office applications.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

EN___

English Requirement

3

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

 

Literacy for Life Requirement

3

 

Humanities & Fine Arts Requirement

3-4

 

Natural & Physical Sciences Requirement

4

PY125

Interpersonal Relations

3

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

OA101

Keyboarding and Document Processing

3

OA103

Filing Systems

3

OA109

Business Math Using Excel

3

OA130

Information Processing

3

OA210

Database Management Systems

3

OA211

Business Communication

3

OA220

Spreadsheet Systems

3

OA230

Advanced Information Processing

3

OA250

Office Procedures

3

SM108

Introduction to Business

3

SM208

Personnel Supervision

3

Electives (Complete 9 credits)

Course

Course Name

Credits

AC100

Fundamentals of Bookkeeping and Accounting

3

CS110

Introduction to the Internet

3

OA240

Machine Transcription

3

OA292

Office Technology Practicum

3

Program Total

61-63

 

Associate of Science in Practical Nursing

The mission of the Nursing and Allied Health Department is to generate locally educated and licensed nurses to work in the various health care provider agencies on Guam and the Pacific region. The Guam Community College Nursing Program is committed to providing career guidance and education in nursing to those students from Guam and the Pacific region who desire to become Practical Nurses. Upon completion of program requirements, students will earn an Associate’s Degree in Practical Nursing and will be eligible to apply and take the National Council Licensure Examination for Practical Nurses (NCLEX-PN). Licensure is granted through the Guam Board of Nurse Examiners.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Practical Nursing program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Utilize established standards and practice guidelines to help client restore, promote and maintain physical and mental health throughout their lifespan. 
  2. Apply therapeutic communication with patients, patient support-persons and members of the health-care team. 
  3. Employ evidence-based decision making to deliver safe and effective client care and to evaluate client outcomes.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

SI131/131L

Human Anatomy & Physiology I (3) and Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lab (1)

4

CS151

Windows Applications

3

CO125

Introduction to Human Communication and Speech

3

PY120

General Psychology

3

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

ED220

Human Growth and Development

3

HL120

Medical Terminology

2

HL131

Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers

1

HL202

Nutrition

3

NU110

Nursing Foundations

8

NU160

Pharmacology for Practical Nurses

4

NU220

Adult Medical-Surgical Nursing

8

NU230

Maternal and Newborn Concepts & Skills

3

NU240

Pediatric Nursing Concepts & Skills

3

NU250

Mental Health Nursing

3

NU280

Nursing Trends

1

NU281

NCLEX-PN Review and Transition

2

NU292

Practical Nursing Practicum

6

SI106

Drug Calculations for Practical Nursing

1

SI132/132L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II (3)/Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab (1)

4

SI150/150L

Introduction to Microbiology (3)/Introduction to Microbiology Lab (1)

4

Program Total

75-77

 

Associate of Science in Pre-Architectural Drafting

The A.S. in Pre-Architectural Drafting covers pre-architecture, building materials and properties, technical drafting, basic Computer Aided Drafting (CADD), architectural computer modeling, and an introductory engineering course. This program prepares students for entry-level employment as CADD operators, draftsmen/women, architect assistants, or as a bridge to enter a career as an Architect which requires a Bachelor’s degree or higher. Graduates are prepared for the professional workforce with sound theoretical knowledge and hands-on experience. This program is an area emphasized in the Architecture & Construction Career Cluster; one out of 16 career clusters in Career & Technical Education.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Pre-Architectural Drafting program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Demonstrate knowledge and skills needed to design and draft projects ranging from two to three dimensional designs for commercial and residential buildings.
  2. Demonstrate basic skills needed to view, print, edit, and create variations of two and three dimensional electronic designs.
  3. Develop a professional work ethic needed in the architectural engineering industry.
  4. Create an electronic portfolio that represents proficiency in the development of two and three dimensional computer aided designs.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA161A

College Algebra & Trigonometry I

4

CS151

Windows Applications

3

PY120

General Psychology

3

SI141

Applied Physics I

4

SO130

Introduction to Sociology

3

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

AE103

 Basic Blueprint Reading

3

AE121

 Technical Engineering Drawing I

3

AE122

 Technical Engineering Drawing II

3

AE138

Building Codes, Specifications & Construction Management

3

AE150

 Computer Aided Drafting I (CAD I)

3

AE160

 Computer Aided Drafting II (CAD II)

3

Choose 1

AE216

 Descriptive Geometry

3

AE170

Revit Architecture Essentials

Course

Course Name

Credits

CE121

 Properties of Materials

3

CE215

 Construction Procedures

3

CE221

 Strength of Materials

3

CE225

 Construction Planning & Estimating

3

EN194

Technical Communication

3

CS101

 Introduction to Computer Systems & Information Technology

3

OR101

 Introduction to Engineering Technology

3

MA161B

 College Algebra & Trigonometry I

4

Program Total

66-67

 

Associate of Science in Supervision and Management

The Supervision and Management program prepares students for entry-level positions and employment in the field of supervision and management. The program is designed for students who want to learn, update and augment existing knowledge and skills and/or acquire cutting-edge technical and managerial skills; it is also designed for current and future leaders, supervisors, and managers who desire the latest skills to be effective and productive in their respective fields.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Supervision & Management program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Describe supervisory techniques to manage people and projects.
  2. Explain planning, organizing, staffing, and controlling functions of an organization.
  3. Discuss ethical behavior required in businesses.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

EN___

English Requirement

3

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

 

Literacy for Life Requirement

3

 

Humanities & Fine Arts Requirement

3-4

 

Natural & Physical Sciences Requirement

4

 

Social & Behavioral Sciences Requirement

3

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

AC211

Accounting Principles I

4

EC110

Principles of Economics

3

SM108

Introduction to Business

3

SM208

Personnel Supervision

3

SM211

E-commerce Management

3

SM215

International Management

3

SM220

Management Skill Development

3

SM225

Leadership

3

SM230

Business Law Applications

3

SM240

Employment & Labor Law

3

SM245

Ethics & Stakeholders Management

3

Electives (Complete 9 Credits)

Course

Course Name

Credits

MK123*

Principles of Marketing

3

MK205*

Entrepreneurship

3

OA211

Business Communication

3

OA250

Office Procedures

3

PY125

Interpersonal Relations

3

SM205

Purchasing

3

SM292*

Supervision & Management Practicum

3

Program Total

65-67

 

Associate of Science in Surveying Technology

The Surveying Technology program prepares the student for immediate employment as a surveying or Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technician and teaches the student knowledge and skills that will enable one to adapt to ever evolving technical and technological changes in geospatial field and office applications. The graduate will be prepared to face the challenge of modern Surveying and GIS practice. The program emphasizes applications-based approaches and provides an overview of the geospatial fields of surveying, mapping, and GIS and prepares the student for further study and for the Level 3 Certified Survey Technician examination prepared by the American Congress of Surveying and Mapping-National Society of Professional Surveyors (ACSM/NSPS).


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Surveying Technology program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Demonstrate preparedness to enter productive technical position in the geospatial fields of surveying, mapping, and Geographic Information Systems.
  2. Successfully pass the American Congress of Surveying and Mapping-National Society of Professional Surveyors (ACSM/NSPS) Level 3 Certified Survey Technician examination.
  3. Develop a professional work ethic needed in the surveying industry.
  4. Demonstrate ability to utilize modern measurement technologies to acquire spatial data and employ industry-standard software to solve technical problems.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA161A

College Algebra & Trigonometry I

4

SO130

Introduction to Sociology

3

CS151

Windows Applications

3

PY120

General Psychology

3

SI141

Applied Physics I

4

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

AE121

Technical Engineering Drawing I

3

AE150

Computer Aided Drafting I (CAD I)

3

CE211

Plane Surveying I

3

CE222

Plane Surveying II

3

CS101

Introduction to Computer Systems & Information Technology

3

HL130

First Aid & Safety

1

MA161B

College Algebra & Trigonometry II

4

OA101

Keyboarding and Document Processing

3

SU100

Surveying Drafting

3

SU101

Surveying Problems I

3

SU230

Advanced Surveying

3

SU240

Boundary Law I

3

SU241

Boundary Law II

3

SU250

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

3

SU251

Advanced Geographic Information Systems

3

SU280

Special Topics in Geographic Information Systems

3

SU292

Surveying Practicum

1

Program Total

68-70

 

Associate of Science in Tourism & Travel Management

The Tourism and Travel Management program is designed for individuals who aspire to begin a career in the tourism and travel industry. Students are introduced to management and operating principles of different sectors of the industry to prepare them for a meaningful career, leadership roles, or entrepreneurial opportunities. 


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Tourism & Travel Management program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Exhibit professionalism and work ethics as it relates to the tourism and travel industry.    
  2. Explain the inter-relationship among component parts of the tourism system.    
  3. Create a career plan identifying additional training needed for professional success.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

EN___

Freshman Composition Requirement

3

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

 

Literacy for Life Requirement

3

 

Humanities & Fine Arts Requirement

3-4

SI___

Natural & Physical Sciences Requirement

4

 

Social & Behavioral Sciences Requirement

3

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

HS150

Welcome to Hospitality

3

HS152

Customer Service

3

HS157

Tourism and Planning Development

3

HS158

Introduction to MEEC

3

HS160

Hospitality Supervision

3

HS254

Hospitality & Travel Marketing

3

HS255

Airline Management

3

HS257

Principles of Tour Guiding

3

HS265

Eco Tourism

3

HS292

Hospitality and Tourism Practicum

3

JA110

Japanese I

4

MK125

Social Media Marketing

3

Choose One

KE110

Korean I

4

KE111

Korean II

Program Total

60-62

 

Associate of Science in Visual Communications

The Associate of Science in Visual Communications focuses on the creative elements in the world of technology. Three major areas are addressed in this program: print, video and interactive media. Although the areas of study are different in delivery, they incorporate skills that are common to all.  The curriculum is geared towards training students to enter the professional industry.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AS in Visual Communications program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Apply the visual elements of line, shape, value, color, texture, typography and space in the creation of visual products. 
  2. Produce and edit photographic and scanned images. 
  3. Plan, record and edit video productions.     
  4. Examine career opportunities in Visual Communications.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

EN___

English Requirement

3

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

CS152

Macintosh Applications

3

VC101

Introduction to Visual Communications

3

SI___

Natural & Physical Sciences Requirement

4

Social and Behavioral Sciences (Choose One)

PY120

General Psychology

3

PY125

Interpersonal Relations

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

VC101

Introduction to Visual Communications

 

VC125

Digital Graphics: Raster

3

VC126

Digital Graphics: Vector

3

VC127

Digital Photography

3

VC128

Design Principles & Elements

3

VC211

Design Studio I

3

VC212

Design Studio II

3

VC221

Interactive Studio I

3

VC222

Interactive Studio II

3

Course

Course Name

Credits

VC231

Video Production I

3

VC232

Video Production II

3

VC291

Project Management and Marketing Solutions

3

VC292

Visual Communication Practicum

3

MK123

Principles of Marketing

3

MK224

Advertising

3

Program Total

61-62

 

Associate of Arts in Culinary Arts

The mission of the Culinary Arts Program is to provide students with practical culinary skills and a strong business foundation to prepare students for high-wage employment and to meet industry demand for trained culinarians.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AA in Culinary Arts program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Demonstrate the attributes of a professional culinarian.    
  2. Apply culinary fundamentals in the preparation of a variety of food products.    
  3. Use quantitative techniques in business decision making processes in a culinary setting.    
  4. Manage resources in a commercial culinary environment.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

Course

Course Name

Credits

FSM145

Culinary Math

3

CS151

Windows Applications

3

PY125

Interpersonal Relations

3

CO125

Introduction to Human Communication and Speech

3

SI110 /110L

Environmental Science (3)/Environmental Science Lab (1)

4

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

FSM120

Food Safety and Sanitation

2

CUL140

Culinary Foundation I

2

CUL160

Culinary Foundation II

2

CUL180

Garde Manger

2

CUL200

Foundations of Baking and Pastry

2

CUL220

Intermediate Baking and Pastry

2

CUL240

Pacific Asian Cuisine

2

FSM270

Foodservice Human Resource Management

3

CUL299

Culinary Capstone

2

CUL293A

Culinary Practicum Part I

3

CUL293B

Culinary Practicum Part II

3

FSM100

Introduction to the Foodservice Profession

2

FSM110/110L

Professional Dining Room Service (2)/    
Professional Dining Room Service Lab (1)

3

Course

Course Name

Credits

FSM115

Purchasing and Receiving

2

FSM130

Professional Bar and Alcohol Management

3

FSM154

Foodservice Nutrition

3

FSM240

Menu Planning

3

Program Total

60-61

 

Associate of Arts in Education

The Education Program’s mission is to prepare individuals to be professional educators, show a positive attitude toward all students and their families, obtain the skills to plan and implement a program that is safe, educational, and healthy. 

The Associate of Arts in Education is designed to provide entry-level training for persons interested in working in educational settings. The program also serves as a career/educational ladder for those interested in pursuing a Bachelor’s Degree in the field. Emphasis is placed on students learning skills that cover a broad range of educational areas. Only technical requirement courses that have a grade of “C” or better in will be counted towards the Certificate degree. 


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AA in Education program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Demonstrate professionalism and ethical conduct within the educational field.
  2. Effectively and respectfully communicate with students, staff and families including those from diverse backgrounds and special populations.
  3. Implement various developmentally and age-appropriate teaching, assessment and guidance strategies needed to effectively work with students in a K-12 classroom setting.

 

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

CS___

Computer Literacy Requirement

3

HU120

Pacific Cultures

3

PY120

General Psychology

3

SI110/110L OR SI130/130L

Environmental Biology (3)/ Environmental Biology Laboratory (1) OR Introduction to Marine Biology (3)/Marine Biology Lab (1)

4

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

ASL100

American Sign Language I

4

ED150

Introduction to Teaching

3

ED180

Educational Methods

3

ED220

Human Growth & Development

3

ED231

Introduction to Exceptionalities

3

ED292

Education Practicum

3

CO125

Introduction to Human Communication & Speech

3

HI121

World Civilization (Pre-historic Time to 1500)

3

HL202

Nutrition

3

PS140

American Government

3

Electives (Students may choose any post-secondary level course not already listed)

Course

Course Name

Credits

 

Elective

4

 

Elective

3

 

Elective

3

Program Total

60-62

 

Associate of Arts in Liberal Studies

Liberal Studies students will explore courses in a variety of disciplines and receive the critical thinking, communication, and problem-solving skills that will prepare them for an array of future careers and life-long learning. Guided by advisors and educators, students will carve out a path that is right for them, and must choose one (1) of four (4) tracks of specialization. Students in the program will also complete various general education requirements for transfer to a four-year program.


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the AA in Liberal Studies program, students will be able to:
 
  1. Plan for an advanced program of study in a particular field or to achieve a career goal, based on interests, skills, and an awareness of different disciplines.
  2. Examine local, regional, and global issues from multiple perspectives.
  3. Internalize their role as a global citizen in a local and/or regional context. 

Students may choose one of the following tracks. Credits for the tracks come from elective credits. Courses chosen from related fields must be approved by an advisor, English Department Chair, or Registrar. 
 

 

Liberal Studies Track

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

CO110

Critical Thinking

3

Natural and Physical Sciences (Choose 1)

SI103/103L

Introduction to Marine Biology (3)/ Introduction to Marine Biology Laboratory (1)

4

SI105/105L

Introduction to Physical Geology (3)/ Introduction to Physical Geology Laboratory (1)

SI110/110L

Environmental Biology (3)/ Environmental Biology Laboratory (1)

Social and Behavioral Sciences (Choose 1)

SO130

Introduction to Sociology

3

PY100

Personal Adjustment

PY120

General Psychology

WG101

Women and Gender Studies

Humanities and Fine Arts (Choose 1)

ASL100

American Sign Language I

4

JA110

Japanese I

CH110

CHamoru I

KE110

Korean I

 

Major Requirements

Category A  (Choose 1)

HI121

World Civilization (Pre-historic Time to 1500)

3

HI122

World Civilization (1500 to Present Time)

PI101

Introduction to Philosophy

HM110

Introduction to Community Services

WG101

Introduction to Women and Gender Studies

Category B

EN111

Writing for Research

3

Category C

CO125

Introduction to Human Communication and Speech

3

Category D (Choose 1)

HU120

Pacific Cultures

3

HI176

Guam History

ED265

Culture and Education in Guam

HM201

Social Welfare and Development

Category E (Choose 1)

ED265

Culture and Education in Gam

3

PY100

Personal Adjustment

3

HM110

Introduction to Community Services

3

HI176

Guam History

3

HU120

Pacific Cultures

3

ASL110

American Sign Language II

4

CH111

CHamoru II

4

JA111

Japanese II

4

KE111

Korean II

4

SI103/1103L

Introduction to Marine Biology (3)/ Introduction to Marine Biology Laboratory (1)

4

SI105/105L

Introduction to Physical Geology (3)/ Introduction to Physical Geology Laboratory (1)

4

SI110/110L

Environmental Biology (3)/ Environmental Biology Laboratory (1)

4

Category F (Choose 1)

TH101

Introduction to the Theater

3

EN210

Introduction to Literature

Electives

 

Any college level course not previously taken

3

 

Any college level course not previously taken

3

 

Any college level course not previously taken

3

 

Any college level course not previously taken

3

 

Any college level course not previously taken

3

 

Any college level course not previously taken

3

 

Any college level course not previously taken

3

 

Any college level course not previously taken

3

Program Total

61-63

 

Business Track

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

CO110

Critical Thinking for Civic Engagement

3

Natural and Physical Sciences (Choose 1)

SI103/103L

Introduction to Marine Biology (3)/ Introduction to Marine Biology Laboratory (1)

4

SI105/105L

Introduction to Physical Geology (3)/ Introduction to Physical Geology Laboratory (1)

SI110/110L

Environmental Biology (3)/ Environmental Biology Laboratory (1)

Social and Behavioral Sciences (Choose 1)

SO130

Introduction to Sociology

3

PY100

Personal Adjustment

PY120

General Psychology

WG101

Women and Gender Studies

Humanities and Fine Arts (Choose 1)

ASL100

American Sign Language I

4

JA110

Japanese I

CH110

CHamoru I

KE110

Korean I

Major Requirements

Category A  (Choose 1)

HI121

World Civilization (Pre-historic Time to 1500)

3

HI122

World Civilization (1500 to Present Time)

PI101

Introduction to Philosophy

HM110

Introduction to Community Services

WG101

Introduction to Women and Gender Studies

Category B

EN111

Writing for Research

3

Category C

CO125

Introduction to Human Communication and Speech

3

Category D (Choose 1)

HU120

Pacific Cultures

3

HI176

Guam History

ED265

Culture and Education in Guam

HM201

Social Welfare and Development

Category E (Choose 1)

ED265

Culture and Education in Gam

3

PY100

Personal Adjustment

3

HM110

Introduction to Community Services

3

HI176

Guam History

3

HU120

Pacific Cultures

3

ASL110

American Sign Language II

4

CH111

CHamoru II

4

JA111

Japanese II

4

KE111

Korean II

4

SI103/1103L

Introduction to Marine Biology (3)/ Introduction to Marine Biology Laboratory (1)

4

SI105/105L

Introduction to Physical Geology (3)/ Introduction to Physical Geology Laboratory (1)

4

SI110/110L

Environmental Biology (3)/ Environmental Biology Laboratory (1)

4

Category F (Choose 1)

Course

Course Name

Credits

TH101

Introduction to the Theater

3

EN210

Introduction to Literature

Business Electives

 

Elective (Any AC, SM, or MK, HS, VC, CUL, FSM course or related field)

3

 

Elective (Any AC, SM, or MK, HS, VC, CUL, FSM course or related field)

3

 

Elective (Any AC, SM, or MK, HS, VC, CUL, FSM course or related field)

3

 

Elective (Any AC, SM, or MK, HS, VC, CUL, FSM course or related field)

3

 

Elective (Any AC, SM, or MK, HS, VC, CUL, FSM course or related field)

3

 

Elective (Any AC, SM, or MK, HS, VC, CUL, FSM course or related field)

3

 

Elective (Any AC, SM, or MK, HS, VC, CUL, FSM course or related field)

3

 

Elective (Any AC, SM, or MK, HS, VC, CUL, FSM course or related field)

3

Program Total

61-63

 

Health and Science Track

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

CO110

Critical Thinking for Civic Engagement

3

Natural and Physical Sciences (Choose 1)

SI103/103L

Introduction to Marine Biology (3)/ Introduction to Marine Biology Laboratory (1)

4

SI105/105L

Introduction to Physical Geology (3)/ Introduction to Physical Geology Laboratory (1)

SI110/110L

Environmental Biology (3)/ Environmental Biology Laboratory (1)

Social and Behavioral Sciences (Choose 1)

SO130

Introduction to Sociology

3

PY100

Personal Adjustment

PY120

General Psychology

WG101

Women and Gender Studies

Humanities and Fine Arts (Choose 1)

ASL100

American Sign Language I

4

JA110

Japanese I

CH110

CHamoru I

KE110

Korean I

Major Requirements

Category A  (Choose 1)

HI121

World Civilization (Pre-historic Time to 1500)

3

HI122

World Civilization (1500 to Present Time)

PI101

Introduction to Philosophy

HM110

Introduction to Community Services

WG101

Introduction to Women and Gender Studies

Category B

EN111

Writing for Research

3

Category C

CO125

Introduction to Human Communication and Speech

3

Category D (Choose 1)

HU120

Pacific Cultures

3

HI176

Guam History

ED265

Culture and Education in Guam

HM201

Social Welfare and Development

Category E (Choose 1)

ED265

Culture and Education in Gam

3

PY100

Personal Adjustment

3

HM110

Introduction to Community Services

3

HI176

Guam History

3

HU120

Pacific Cultures

3

ASL110

American Sign Language II

4

CH111

CHamoru II

4

JA111

Japanese II

4

KE111

Korean II

4

SI103/1103L

Introduction to Marine Biology (3)/ Introduction to Marine Biology Laboratory (1)

4

SI105/105L

Introduction to Physical Geology (3)/ Introduction to Physical Geology Laboratory (1)

4

SI110/110L

Environmental Biology (3)/ Environmental Biology Laboratory (1)

4

Category F (Choose 1)

Course

Course Name

Credits

TH101

Introduction to the Theater

3

EN210

Introduction to Literature

Health and Science Electives

 

Elective (Any MA, SI, HL, NU, MS, CJ, HM courses or related field)

3

 

Elective (Any MA, SI, HL, NU, MS, CJ, HM courses or related field)

3

 

Elective (Any MA, SI, HL, NU, MS, CJ, HM courses or related field)

3

 

Elective (Any MA, SI, HL, NU, MS, CJ, HM courses or related field)

3

 

Elective (Any MA, SI, HL, NU, MS, CJ, HM courses or related field)

3

 

Elective (Any MA, SI, HL, NU, MS, CJ, HM courses or related field)

3

 

Elective (Any MA, SI, HL, NU, MS, CJ, HM courses or related field)

3

 

Elective (Any MA, SI, HL, NU, MS, CJ, HM courses or related field)

3

Program Total

61-63

 

CHamoru Education and Culture Track

General Education Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

Course

Course Name

Credits

MA___

Mathematics Requirement

3-4

CO110

Critical Thinking for Civic Engagement

3

Natural and Physical Sciences (Choose 1)

SI103/103L

Introduction to Marine Biology (3)/ Introduction to Marine Biology Laboratory (1)

4

SI105/105L

Introduction to Physical Geology (3)/ Introduction to Physical Geology Laboratory (1)

SI110/110L

Environmental Biology (3)/ Environmental Biology Laboratory (1)

Social and Behavioral Sciences (Choose 1)

SO130

Introduction to Sociology

3

PY100

Personal Adjustment

PY120

General Psychology

WG101

Women and Gender Studies

Humanities and Fine Arts (Choose 1)

ASL100

American Sign Language I

4

JA110

Japanese I

CH110

CHamoru I

KE110

Korean I

Major Requirements

Category A  (Choose 1)

HI121

World Civilization (Pre-historic Time to 1500)

3

HI122

World Civilization (1500 to Present Time)

PI101

Introduction to Philosophy

HM110

Introduction to Community Services

WG101

Introduction to Women and Gender Studies

Category B

EN111

Writing for Research

3

Category C

CO125

Introduction to Human Communication and Speech

3

Category D (Choose 1)

HU120

Pacific Cultures

3

HI176

Guam History

ED265

Culture and Education in Guam

HM201

Social Welfare and Development

Category E (Choose 1)

ED265

Culture and Education in Gam

3

PY100

Personal Adjustment

3

HM110

Introduction to Community Services

3

HI176

Guam History

3

HU120

Pacific Cultures

3

ASL110

American Sign Language II

4

CH111

CHamoru II

4

JA111

Japanese II

4

KE111

Korean II

4

SI103/1103L

Introduction to Marine Biology (3)/ Introduction to Marine Biology Laboratory (1)

4

SI105/105L

Introduction to Physical Geology (3)/ Introduction to Physical Geology Laboratory (1)

4

SI110/110L

Environmental Biology (3)/ Environmental Biology Laboratory (1)

4

Category F (Choose 1)

Course

Course Name

Credits

TH101

Introduction to the Theater

3

EN210

Introduction to Literature

CHamoru Education and Culture Electives

 

CHamoru Education and Culture related course

3

 

CHamoru Education and Culture related course

3

 

CHamoru Education and Culture related course

3

 

CHamoru Education and Culture related course

3

 

CHamoru Education and Culture related course

3

 

CHamoru Education and Culture related course

3

 

CHamoru Education and Culture related course

3

 

CHamoru Education and Culture related course

3

Program Total

61-63


The categories A, B, C, D, E, and F above correspond to the following UOG gen ed categories:

Category A: Human Systems and Organizations (Tier II)
Category B: Core Foundation (Tier I)
Category C: Core Foundation (Tier I)
Category D: Cultural Perspectives (Tier II)
Category E: Uniquely UOG (Tier II)
Category F: Creative and Expressive Arts (Tier II)
    
Note on Major Requirements: Where more than one option is presented, choose one course from each category. Choose courses not previously taken for General Education or another category. If you are planning to transfer, you should choose courses that align with the general education requirements of your desired major at a four-year institution. Consult with your advisor to create your educational plan.
 

Bachelor’s Degree Program

Degree Statement

Upon successful completion of the requirements for graduation, the College will award the Bachelor’s Degree.

Graduation Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree

The student must indicate which year’s catalog requirements they choose to satisfy when submitting the Application for Degree, Certificate, or Diploma. It is the responsibility of the student to apply for any degree, certificate or diploma they have earned.
Students qualify for graduation once the following requirements are met:
 
  • Achieve a 2.0 cumulative GPA as an undergraduate student.
  • Meet individual program requirements, including major GPA (if applicable).
  • Fulfill residency requirements – at least 12-degree applicable credit hours of coursework completed at the College.
  • Successfully complete the program pertaining to their degree.
  • Submit Application for Graduation to the Admissions & Registration Office by the applicable deadline and pay the graduation fee.
  • Meet financial obligations to the school.

NOTE:  A single course cannot be used to satisfy more than one course requirement in a program.

General Requirements for Bachelor’s Degrees

Effective fall Semester 2003, several academic policy changes were implemented to ensure that students are adequately prepared to meet business and industry standards. All Undeclared or newly Declared Students enrolled in regularly scheduled postsecondary courses must be enrolled in or have completed EN110 Freshman Composition general education requirement by the time they have enrolled in 12 credits of classes. They must also enroll in or have completed MA110A Finite Mathematics (or higher) general education requirement by the time they have enrolled in 15 credits. This means that students may take only nine to eleven (9-11) credits before they must begin meeting the general education requirements. All declared students in the Bachelor’s Degree program are required to successfully complete minimum standardized general education course requirements. For more information, refer to the Admissions Information and General Education Policy section of this catalog.

All candidates for a Bachelor’s Degree at the College must meet the general requirements listed above. Course requirements may identify Prerequisite that must be completed with a passing grade. Prerequisite course credit is not counted as credit earned towards the program unless it is a Bachelor’s Degree core course requirement.

Second Certificate or Degree and Multiple Tracks in Degree Programs

A second certificate and/or degree may be granted provided that a student completes all additional major and general education requirements. Some programs of study offer more than one track; a student may earn a degree, which includes more than one track so long as the student completes the requirements before the degree is conferred.

General Education Requirements

Recognizing the necessity for students to succeed in the complex and rapidly changing workplace, Guam Community College offers a general education curriculum that introduces students to major areas of knowledge and methods of inquiry. All degree programs require an interdisciplinary general education component that promotes the development of intellectual skills that enable students to become effective learners and informed citizens. Critical thinking, the use of language and computation, appropriate social skills, global awareness and respect for diverse opinions are among the learning outcomes provided in the general education requirements of each program.

Guam Community College believes that general education provides the academic foundation necessary for students to achieve their life goals. General education is intended to offer students a breadth of quality student learning experiences, encourage their respect for cultural heritage, promote their ethical and responsible social behavior and facilitate their life-long learning.

The General Education program strives to foster student learning and skill development in civic engagement, critical thinking, understanding of the relationship between the individual and society, information literacy, oral communication, quantitative reasoning, and written communication.

Guam Community College believes that high quality general education opportunities for all citizens are necessary for democratic principles and practices to exist and for a sound economy to flourish. The College continually scrutinizes the general education curriculum in order to assure that all degrees and certificates granted by the College support this vision of general education and that it serves as a means to inspire hope, opportunity and responsibility in all its constituencies.

Requirements for General Education follow the options described below. Students declared prior to fall 2010 will follow the requirements indicated in the applicable catalog in which they first declared their major program at the College.


Notes on General Education requirements

Students are advised to check the requirements for their specific programs before taking General Education courses.
Courses chosen to meet the general education requirements may not be used to meet the Major Requirements of a student’s specific degree program.

The list contains courses with pre-requisites, so students should make their choices carefully and thoughtfully. Students may consult a counselor or an academic advisor for guidance in choosing any of the course options listed. 

IMPORTANT NOTE: Some programs require different levels of coursework to meet General Education requirements, please review the individual programs for more information.

A Statement on Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Program Student Learning Outcomes follow each program description in the following pages. SLOs intentionally describe the 3-5 central goals that students will have attained by the end of the program. In essence, SLOs encapsulate the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that students are expected to learn from their respective programs. The focus is on what students can do with what they have learned and this outcome should be evaluated in some way. Primarily, three questions essentially frame the articulation of SLOs:
 
  1. What do students know? (cognitive domain)
  2. What do they think and value? (affective domain)
  3. What can they do? (behavioral domain)

In this catalog, program SLOs describe the broadest goals for the program, particularly those that require higher-level thinking. They, therefore, require students to synthesize many discrete skills or areas of content. SLOs also ask students to produce artifacts such as term papers, projects, portfolios, demonstrations, exams or other student work. Most importantly, SLOs also need to be evaluated or assessed in some way so that accountability and improvement remain the hallmarks of a good program. A separate SLO Booklet is published and updated regularly to guide faculty in helping students achieve articulated course outcomes.

The College, in close collaboration with faculty and members of Advisory committees, continues to embark on an ongoing institutional effort to revise and update all its curriculum documents so that they remain responsive to industry and community needs.


SLO Mapping - ILO, PROGRAM, AND COURSE LEVELS

SLOs also align with collective program and institution level expectations for student learning translated into the curriculum and co-curriculum. Most importantly, these SLOs map to the curriculum, co-curriculum and other educational practices that provide students multiple opportunities for meaningful learning. SLO maps developed for three (3) different levels – ILOs, program, and course -- reflect the desired goals of learning experiences that the College continues to intentionally develop, structure, deliver, and evaluate on an ongoing basis.

Bachelor of Science in Career and Technical Education

The Bachelor of Science in Career and Technical Education (BS CTE) program aims to produce high-quality CTE educators who will possess technical expertise, pedagogical competencies and values to effectively teach 21st century skills, using culturally-responsive teaching, to diverse learners.  The program conforms to the standards of the Association for Advancing Quality in Educator Preparation (AAQEP) andthe National Board of Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS-CTE).  As designed, the program provides students with the necessary tools to seek employment in K-12, trade and technical schools, community colleges, and in industry or business environments. This program offers students the opportunity to articulate an Associate Degree in any career and technical education field of study to GCC’s Bachelor of Science in CTE.  It also prepares students for CTE teaching certification with the Guam Educator Commission for Certification.  

Refer to the Advance CTE website for additional information on Career and Technical Education (www.careertech.org).   


Program Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of the BS in Career and Technical Education, students will be able to:
 
  1. Create an engaging classroom environment aligned to the needs of diverse learners.
  2. Plan, develop, and deliver curriculum that is based on rigorous and relevant expectations and culturally-relevant teaching methodology.
  3. Integrate into instruction effective and research-based teaching and learning principles embedded with best assessment practices and use of technology. 
  4. Apply leadership and ethical principles in the implementation and management of CTE programs.

 

General Education Requirements

English

Course #

Course Name

Credits

English (Choose 1)

EN110A

Freshman Composition with Instructional Lab

4

EN110

Freshman Composition

3

Course

Course Name

Credits

EN111

Writing for Research

3

EN300

 Writing for Educators

3

Mathematics

Course #

Course Name

Credits

MA115 (or higher)

Fundamentals of College Algebra

3

MA151

Introductory Statistics

3

MA385

Applied Statistics

3

Literacy for Life Skills

Course #

Course Name

Credits

CO110

Critical Thinking for Civic Engagement

3

Humanities & Fine Arts

Course #

Course Name

Credits

ED265

Culture & Education in Guam

3

CO125

Introduction to Human Communication and Speech

3

General Education Requirements (Continued)

Natural & Physical Sciences (Choose one course and the corresponding lab from the following to meet the required 4 credits) **

Course #

Course Name

Credits

SI101/101L

Introduction to Chemistry (3) & Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory (1)

4

SI103/103L

Introduction to Marine Biology (3) & Introduction to Marine Biology Laboratory (1)

SI105/105L

Introduction to Physical Geology (3) & Introduction to Physical Geology Laboratory (1)

SI110/110L

Environmental Biology (3) & Environmental Biology Laboratory (1)

SI141

Applied Physics I

SI 150/150L

Introduction to Microbiology (3) & Introduction to Microbiology Laboratory (1)

SI131/131L

Human Anatomy & Physiology I (3) & Human Anatomy & Physiology I Laboratory (1)

SI132/132L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II (3) & Human Anatomy & Physiology II Laboratory (1)

**The exception to this would be SI141 which does not include a laboratory requirement

Social & Behavioral Sciences

Course #

Course Name

Credits

PY120

General Psychology

3

PY325

Work Ethic in Career and Technical Fields

3

Minimum General Education Requirements

37

Major Requirements

Course

Course Name

Credits

 

CTE Area of Study

40

ED150

Introduction to Teaching 

3

ED220

Human Growth & Development  

3

ED300

Principles of Adult Teaching & Learning

3

CTE299A

Praxis I Review Part A       

2

CTE299B

Praxis I Review Part B

1

CTE300

Foundations of Career and Technical Education

3

CTE310

CTE Methods of Teaching I: Planning and Preparation

3

CTE320

Classroom and CTE Laboratory Management

3

CTE330

Educational Technology 

3

CTE340

CTE Methods of Teaching II: Instructional Delivery 

3

CTE350

Assessment and Grading

3

CTE400

CTE Program Management & Leadership

3

CTE410

CTE Methods of Teaching III: 21st Century Teaching Methodology

3

CTE492

Student Teaching/Practicum

12

CTE498

Praxis III Review  

2

CTE499

Applied Research: CTE Capstone

3

Program Total

130

 

*For students holding an Associate’s or a Bachelor’s degree in a CTE field of study and have transferred in at least 52 college credits in their respective CTE field and some General Education requirements. Each student situation will differ.

Course Descriptions & Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Explanation of course numbering

Courses offered by the College are numbered as follows:

000-049 These courses are noncredit courses. These courses may satisfy prerequisite requirements and/or provide appropriate remediation for courses numbered 050-099 in the same subject areas.

050-099 These courses except for MA096, MA097, MA098, EN096, and EN097 are accepted toward meeting the requirements of the Adult High School and some Certificate/Degree programs.

100-299 These courses are accepted toward meeting requirements of the Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degrees conferred by the College. These courses are also accepted toward meeting the requirements of certificates conferred by the College. 

300-499 These courses are accepted toward meeting requirements for the Bachelor of Science program.

Course numbers indicate the level of the course. Courses numbered 100-199 are intended for freshman or sophomore students; courses numbered 200-299 are intended for sophomore students.

Courses numbered 100-299 may be used to meet Adult High School Diploma requirements. Diploma Students taking courses numbered 100-299 to meet the Adult High School Diploma should select such courses with the advice and approval of their counselor or advisor.

Note: The course descriptions that follow are alphabetized by course alpha and number (i.e., from AC100 to WE220). They are also grouped by fields of study. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) at the course level, follow these course descriptions. SLOs at the course level describe what students should be able to perform, apply, or produce in relation to how and what they have learned. In the course SLOs that follow, clear and intentional expectations are laid out, particularly as they define the goals of student learning experiences. In a nutshell, they specify what students should be able to know, do, or value after participating in planned learning activities.

With this AY2021-2022 catalog, continuous efforts to revisit all curriculum documents so that SLOs become integral components of each and every course at the College have been completed. This effort will continue for all new courses.

Before the course descriptions, there is a notation about the frequency of offerings, i.e., spring only, fall only, or as needed. Summer courses are also scheduled as needed. The College, however, always reserves the right to cancel courses, due to low student enrollment or other justifiable reasons.
 

Accounting (AC)

AC100 FUNDAMENTALS OF BOOKKEEPING AND ACCOUNTING

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Placement into MA098 or higher

This course covers accounting principles to include interpreting source documents, analyzing business transactions; recording entries in a general journal; posting to the ledger, preparing the worksheet with adjustments; journalizing, adjusting and closing entries; preparing financial statements, and the post-closing trial balance.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply accounting procedures to properly record financial information about a business.
  2. Apply generally accepted accounting theory and principles to perform all the steps of the accounting cycle for a service and retail type business.
  3. Perform internal control procedures to protect and properly manage cash and other business assets.
 
 

AC110 PAYROLL ACCOUNTING

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Placement into MA110A or higher

This course covers the most current methods and procedures of calculating payroll and payroll taxes. It includes the latest developments in payroll tax law, covering information on wages, payroll operations, employment practices, and voluntary employee deductions; differences between the USA and the Territory of Guam payroll accounting systems are examined.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain why laws and regulatory compliance pertaining to personnel and payroll records are integral to a company. 
  2. Calculate wages, explore earnings records, and prepare a payroll register.
  3. Perform all aspects of payroll operations.
 
 

AC150 FEDERAL INCOME TAX I

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Placement into MA098 or higher

A study of the basic forms and structures of federal taxation, particularly aspects which affect individual taxpayers, to include: components of tax formula, the use of the standard deduction. Personal exemption qualifications, filing systems, tax tables, exclusions from income, various categories of deductions, investment losses and passive activity losses, net operating losses, and tax credits.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain what the federal income tax is and distinguish it from other types of federal taxes.
  2. Differentiate between the regular income tax and the alternative minimum tax.
  3. Apply necessary steps to compute a taxpayer's federal income tax liability and apply tax language and terms appropriately throughout the process of computing a taxpayer's federal income tax return.
 
 

AC210 INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3

This course covers the basic fundamentals of financial management for a business. Students will learn about financial management with focus on statement analysis, procurement and utilization of funds, costs and problems associated with acquiring funds, forecasting profits gained through their use, markets, risk and rate of return, time value of money, valuation of stocks and bonds, dividend policy and financial planning and working capital management.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the major financial markets and their role. 
  2. Analyze financial statements to determine future prospects of a business. 
  3. Forecast a financial statement using a set of financial assumptions. 
 
 

AC211 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES I 

Credits: 4    
Prerequisite: Placement into MA098 or higher

This course prepares the student for entry-level accounting jobs, such as accounting clerk and bank teller. Students will interpret and apply accounting principles and concepts to record and report accounting data for sole proprietorship and merchandise business; apply internal control procedures, such as special journals and subsidiary ledgers; apply inventory costing methods; processing account issues for receivables, bank reconciliation and petty cash; calculate depreciation schedules for assets; and record data for intangible assets. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply accounting principles and concepts to record and report business financial data.
  2. Perform all the steps in the procedure of the accounting cycle for a service and merchandise business.
  3. Calculate inventory data using various types of costing methods.
 
 

AC212 ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES II

Credits: 4    
Prerequisite: AC211

Accounting theory and principles are discussed relating to corporations, manufacturing, budgeting and cost analysis. Specific topics include current and contingent liabilities,
accounting for corporations, accounting for corporate income taxes, investments in bonds, accounting for bonds payable, the Statement of Cash Flows, Financial Statement analysis, job
order and process costing systems. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate proficiency to prepare corporate financial statements including the statement of cash flows and statement of stockholder's equity.
  2. Contrast the accounting systems used by manufacturing businesses: job order and process costing.
  3. Explain and illustrate how standards are used in budgeting.
 
 

AC225 HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY ACCOUNTING

Credits: 3        
Course Offering: Fall
Prerequisite: AC211 and AC212

This course presents the fundamentals of financial accounting through hospitality industry simulation-problems and experiences using American Hotel and Lodging Association Educational Institute (AHLEI) materials. Accounting topics include procedures for merchandise and supplies inventories, fixed assets and depreciation methods, current liabilities and payroll, internal controls of cash, receivables and payables, which are major elements of financial statements for the hospitality industry are emphasized. A Hospitality Industry Financial Accounting certificate will be provided to those who pass the AHLEI exam with a score of 70% or better.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Implement procedures for merchandise and supplies inventories, fixed assets and depreciation methods, current liabilities and payroll, internal controls of cash, receivables and payables.
  2. Perform analysis and interpretation of financial statements of the hospitality industry.
  3. Discuss computerized accounting systems prevalent in hospitality businesses that use special journals and subsidiary ledgers.
 
 

AC233 ACCOUNTING ON THE COMPUTER USING QUICKBOOKS

Credits: 3    
Prerequisite: AC110, AC150, AC212

Students will apply accumulated accounting knowledge and skills from accounting fields such as payroll, federal tax, inventory, merchandising, accounts receivable, accounts payable, and cash management using an accounting software called QuickBooks. Students will develop extensive skills about the features of QuickBooks.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply accumulated accounting knowledge and skills from accounting fields such as payroll, federal tax, inventory, merchandising, accounts receivable, accounts payable and cash management using accounting software called QuickBooks.
  2. Develop extensive skills to use basic features of QuickBooks accounting software.
  3. Review accounting knowledge and adapt such knowledge to computer accounting skills.
 
 

AC240 CERTIFIED BOOKKEEPER REVIEW 

Credits: 3    
Prerequisite: AC211

A detailed study and review structured to prepare students to pass the national test for Certified Bookkeeper (CB) given by the American Institute of Professional Bookkeepers (AIPB). This course covers specific topics such as adjusting entries, reconciliation and errors, payroll, depreciation, and inventory.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Utilize mastery-level skills required in bookkeeping.
  2. Apply proper procedures in bookkeeping.
  3. Discuss the universal Code of Ethics for bookkeepers.
 
 

AC250 FEDERAL INCOME TAX II

Credits: 3    
Course Offering: Spring only
Prerequisite: AC150

This course is the second of two courses on Federal Taxation structure. Emphasis is given to the unique factors involved in taxation of individuals, and other U.S. Federal tax returns such as partnership and corporation. It includes the latest developments in federal tax laws, covering information on property transactions, retirement plans, partnerships/S corporation basis and loss limitations.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss with basic understanding, the formation and operation of corporations related to corporate taxation.
  2. Discuss corporate taxation regulations related to corporate distributions to shareholders.
  3. Analyze taxation issues for stock redemptions treated as a sale or exchange or as a dividend.
 
 

AC280 PERSONAL FINANCE

Credits: 3    
Prerequisite: EN110, MA110A placement or equivalent

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic terminology, concepts, and practices of personal finance. This course is not intended to make anyone a financial expert. It will provide the foundation to understand and discuss the "language" of routine financial activities, and provide a solid foundation for future studies. Managing personal finances, tax problems, insurance, credit, budgeting, financial planning, home ownership, bank accounts, investments, and social insurance programs.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply theory learned in the classroom to the work environment.
  2. Plan financially using critical thinking skills and concepts.
  3. Demonstrate financial responsibility through course projects
  4. Set financial goals that reflect the acquisition of course content.
 
 

AC292 ACCOUNTING PRACTICUM

Credits: 3    
Prerequisite: AC233 or DC or Instructor recommendation for approval by TPS Dean

This course provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate professionalism, employ reflective practices while working and/or volunteering for a total of 180 hours at an employer setting under the supervision of an accountant or supervisor.  The Cooperative Education program provides an opportunity to qualified associate degree seeking students to receive credit and work experience related to Accounting.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply theory learned in the classroom to the work environment.
  2. Practice effective interpersonal skills in the workplace.
  3. Document the synthesis of knowledge and skills gained through work experience in a reflection paper.

Architectural Engineering (AE)

AE103 BASIC BLUEPRINT READING 

Credits: 3

This course will introduce the basic skills in reading and interpreting blueprint drawings and prepare basic to advanced technical sketches. Additionally, students will learn the basic principles, concepts, American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and International System of Units (SI) Metric drafting symbols and standards, terminology, and other related technical information contained on a mechanical or Computer-Aided Design (CAD) drawing.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the basis for blueprinting reading and sketching. 
  2. Create basic and/or advanced technical sketches. 
  3. Apply symbols and notes to visually communicate drawings and sketches.
 
 

AE121 TECHNICAL ENGINEERING DRAWING I

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: AE103

This course involves the use of drawing instruments and techniques of drafting management skills for mechanical, civil, and architectural drawings involving freehand sketches, lettering, orthographic views and pictorial drawings. Students will learn how to use drawing instruments for accurate measurements with detailed instructions.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain basic components of a blueprint. 
  2. Demonstrate proper use of drafting instruments to draw existing plans.
  3. Measure existing drawings for accuracy. 
 
 

AE122 TECHNICAL ENGINEERING DRAWING II

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: AE121

This course involves the creation of working drawings of simple building structures, floor plans, front and rear elevations, left and right elevations, transverse and longitudinal sections, cabinets, closet and bar details, plumbing, electrical, and site and plot plans. Students will also render topographic maps.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Create a set of working drawings.
  2. Depict different elevation views accurately.
  3. Incorporate plumbing symbols into a typical house plan.
  4. Incorporate electrical symbols into a typical house plan.
 
 

AE138 BUILDING CODES, SPECIFICATIONS & CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Placement into EN110 or equivalent

An interpretation and study of local and national building codes and standards, construction documents and office organization. This course will be of value to anyone who plans to enter, or is presently working in the field of construction. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain local and national building codes and standards.
  2. Identify the process for acquiring a building permit.
  3. Explain the various agencies’ functions in the permitting process.
 
 

AE150 COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING I (CAD I)

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: AE122

This course introduces students to computer aided drafting software as a drafting tool and to the use of computers in producing line drawings.  Students will learn topics such as equipment components, terminology, storing and retrieving drawings, and printing and plotting through the use of a computer-aided drafting software application. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Produce line drawings using computer aided drafting technology.
  2. Demonstrate basic proficiency in the use of the computer aided drafting software.
  3. Explain basic equipment components and terminology used in computer aided drafting. 
 
 

AE160 COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING II (CADD II)

Credits: 3
Prerequisite:  AE150

This course presents students with intermediate editing techniques in computer aided drafting. Students will learn the roles of an architectural/engineering CAD operator and will learn to use a 3D printer. Students will also gain knowledge and practical experience necessary for entry-level jobs requiring computer aided drafting. Formerly Computer Aided Design & Drafting II (CADD II).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Create a construction drawing set consisting of at least six sheets from a given design. 
  2. Produce an electronic document that complies with building codes. 
  3. Produce 3-dimensional editing figures with a 3D printer.
 
 

AE170 REVIT ARCHITECTURE ESSENTIALS 

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: AE160

This course will teach students Revit’s functionality as it pertains to the design process.  Students will create 3D architectural project models and set up working drawings.  Technical training focuses on theory, concepts, and basic tools of BIM (Building Information Modeling) to work with 
Autodesk Revit Architecture.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the purpose of Building Information Management (BIM) and how it is applied in Revit. 
  2. Utilize the Revit Architecture workspace and interface. 
  3. Create increasingly complex drawings in Revit.
 
 

AE216 DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: MA161B

This course covers the analysis and solution of three-dimensional problems through application of the principles of multi-view projection. Topics include spatial relationships typical of engineering problems, auxiliary views, revolutions, curved lines and surfaces, intersections of surfaces and shades and shadows. This course is recommended for pre-engineering students and drafting majors.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply graphical methods to solve three-dimensional space problems.
  2. Set up projection planes to satisfy specific requirements.
  3. Use computer drafting software such as AutoCAD® to create a three-dimensional object with integration of geometric shapes and save to an electronic medium.

American Sign Language (ASL)

ASL100 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I

Credits: 4

This course provides students with beginning skills in American Sign Language, including fingerspelling the alphabet, signing basic numbers and using basic vocabulary to facilitate communication with the Deaf in ASL. In addition, students will be introduced to deaf culture and the importance of using body and facial expressions to convey information and to develop visual acuity.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate basic expressive and receptive conversational skills in American Sign Language (ASL) that includes a core vocabulary and fingerspelling the alphabet and numbers.
  2. Demonstrate visual acuity using body/facial expressions, gestures, and other nonverbal skills to convey information and respond to information received.
  3. Interact with deaf people in an accepting and sensitive manner.
 
 

ASL110 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: ASL100

This course is a continuation of American Sign Language I. The course objectives are to continue to develop basic syntactic knowledge of American Sign Language, vocabulary, fingerspelling and conversational skills. Aspects of the Deaf community and culture are also incorporated.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate basic understanding of American Sign Language (ASL) that includes manually-coded English and finger spelling.
  2. Demonstrate expanded vocabulary and conversational range such as talking about other people and activities, giving directions, describing people, and making requests.
  3. Use ASL to communicate with individuals who are Deaf or hard of hearing.
 
 

ASL120 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE III

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: ASL110

The course provides intermediate conversational skills in American Sign Language with an emphasis on expressive and receptive skills development. Students will further their understanding of American Sign Language syntax, vocabulary, and signing skills. Deaf culture will be further explored.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Utilize American Sign Language (ASL) to include manually coded English and finger spelling at an intermediate level.
  2. Expand ASL vocabulary and conversational range such as talking about other people and activities, classifiers, giving directions, describing people, using number/time concepts, and making requests.
  3. Interact and communicate with the Deaf and Hard of Hearing population at an intermediate level as indicated by Gallaudet University standards.
 
 

ASL130 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE IV 

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: ASL120

This is the fourth course in the American Sign Language (ASL) sequence.  Students will learn advanced competency and fluency in American Sign Language, grammar, and syntax.  Cultural features and variations in ASL are also addressed.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Competently communicate in American Sign Language. 
  2. Apply appropriate signing skills to illustrate one’s understanding of the culture within the Deaf community. 
  3. Demonstrate critical thinking and appropriate ethical responses required by the Registry of Deaf Interpreter’s Code of Professional Conduct.

Automotive Service Technology (AST)

AST100 INTRODUCTION TO AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE

Credits: 3

This course introduces the student to core principles in Automotive Service Technology, providing them with the foundational knowledge necessary for success in all additional Automotive Service Technology upper 100-level courses. Students will become familiar with basic concepts and practices related to automotive service, safety and customer service. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply proper shop safety concepts and practices. 
  2. Describe good customer relations.
  3. Identify and properly use basic hand tools and shop equipment 
  4. Explain how a gasoline engine functions.
  5. Diagnose basic automotive problems using measurements. 
 
 

AST110 ENGINE REPAIR
Credits: 3
Course Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisite: DC approval

This course covers core principles in Engine Repair, to include the foundational knowledge necessary for more advanced study and experiential development of engine repair skills. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Verify engine mechanical timing.
  2. Measure camshaft for run-out, journal wear, and lobe wear. 
  3. Remove engine cylinder head clean and visually inspect for cracks, warpage, and any damage to mating surfaces. 
  4. Inspect and replace camshaft and drive belt/chain. 
 
 

AST113 HYBRID ENGINES AND MOTOR/GENERATORS

Credits: 4
Corequisite: AST260

This course introduces the student to core principles of hybrid electric vehicle engine and motor/generator propulsion technology. Students will learn skillsets necessary for diagnosing and making repairs to hybrid electric vehicles.   

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate proper safety practices when servicing high-voltage hybrid electric vehicles.
  2. Diagnose hybrid engine failures.
  3. Explain the operation of permanent magnet and induction electric motors. 
  4. Differentiate the functionality of electrical inverter and converter components. 
  5. Troubleshoot faults in the electric propulsion sensing system.
 
 

AST120 AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION AND TRANS-AXLE 

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: DC approval

This course covers the core principles in automotive automatic transmission/trans-axle systems and will provide students with the foundational knowledge necessary for more advanced study and experiential development of skills in diagnosing and performing repairs.   

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Diagnose fluid loss and condition concerns. 
  2. Perform automatic trans/trans-axle pressure tests. 
  3. Check fluid level in automatic transmission or a trans-axle not equipped with a dip-stick.
  4. Replace transmission fluid and filter(s). 
  5. Inspect, replace, and align power-train mounts. 
 
 

AST123 HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE ENERGY MANAGEMENT, TRANSAXLES, AND BATTERIES 

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: AST113

This course introduces the student to core principles of hybrid electric vehicle energy management, transaxles, and batteries. Students will learn skillsets necessary for diagnosing and making repairs to hybrid electric vehicles. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe functionality of hybrid electric vehicle energy management system.
  2. Illustrate hybrid transaxle construction.
  3. Perform drive system fault analysis.
  4. Troubleshoot battery system faults. 
 
 

AST130 MANUAL DRIVE TRAIN AND AXLES I

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: AST100

This course introduces the student to core principles in manual drive train and axle systems, providing them with the foundational knowledge necessary for more advanced study and experiential development of skills in diagnosing and making repairs to manual drive train and axle systems.   

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Perform general drive train diagnostics and develop an action plan.
  2. Diagnose and repair transmission and transaxle to include clutch system.
  3. Ascertain cause of failure and perform needed repairs to the drive shaft assembly, constant-velocity joint (CV), universal joint, and front wheel drive (FWD) wheel bearings and hubs.
  4. Determine structural integrity of differential drive components and perform preventive maintenance.
  5. Inspect four-wheel drive components for proper operation.
 
 

AST133 HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE BELTED ALTERNATOR STARTER (BAS) 

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: AST113

This course introduces the student to core principles of hybrid electric vehicle batteries Belted Alternator Starter (BAS), power electronics and support systems. Students will learn the skillsets necessary for diagnosing and making repairs to hybrid electric vehicles. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the Belted Alternator Starter (BAS) system. 
  2. Explain the functionality of the hybrid support systems power electronics. 
  3. Diagnose hybrid power electronic system faults.
  4. Perform hybrid support system fault analysis. 
 
 

AST140 SUSPENSION AND STEERING

Credits: 3
Course Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisite: AST100

This course covers wheel alignment and correction, wheels and tires, active and passive suspension systems, steering and steering assist, progressive steering systems, and replacement of worn or damaged parts.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and interpret short and long arm and strut suspension faults and determine necessary action.
  2. Perform preventive maintenance procedures on power steering system.
  3. Diagnose tire related concerns and determine necessary action.
  4.  Service and adjust parallelogram, and rack and pinion steering systems.
 
 

AST150 BRAKE SYSTEMS I

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: AST100

This course introduces the student to core principles in brake systems, providing them with the foundational knowledge necessary for more advanced study and experiential development of skills in diagnosing and making repairs to automobile brake systems. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Perform general brake assessment to determine causes for concern.
  2. Inspect and service hydraulic brake system.
  3. Diagnose disc and drum brake system faults and perform basic service.
  4. Describe functionality of vacuum actuated power-assist units.
  5. Service wheel bearings, parking brakes and brake-related electrical components.
 
 

AST160 ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS

Credits: 3
Course Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisite: AST100

This course covers diagnoses, repair and replacement of components involved in vehicular starting, charging, internal illumination, external illumination, instrumentation, horns, wiper systems, supplemental inflatable restraints (air bags) and accessories. Emphasis is given to interpretation and utilization of electrical diagrams.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Perform general electrical system diagnosis.
  2. Service battery and starting system.
  3. Diagnose and repair lighting system.
  4. Determine cause of inoperative electronic gauges and accessories, determine required action.
 
 

AST170 HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING

Credits: 3
Course Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisite: AST100

This course covers diagnoses, performance checks, repair of air conditioning compressors, replacement of heating and air conditioning components, repairs and/or replacement of liquid cooling system components, and servicing of ventilation systems.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Conduct performance check on A/C system and determine concern.
  2. Recover and recycle refrigerant and charge A/C system.
  3. Service A/C system components.
  4. Perform diagnostics on heating, ventilation, and engine cooling system and perform needed repairs.
  5. Diagnose and repair A/C and heating related controls.
 
 

AST180A ENGINE PERFORMANCE I

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: AST100

This course introduces the student to core principles in systems related to the performance of an engine providing them with the foundational knowledge necessary for more advanced study and experiential development of skills in diagnosing and making repairs to engine performance control systems. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Ascertain mechanical integrity of engine.
  2. Test ignition system input sensors and replace failed components.
  3. Perform engine computer control system diagnostics.
  4. Demonstrate required service to fuel, air induction, and exhaust systems.
 
 

AST180B ENGINE PERFORMANCE II 

Credits: 3
Course Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisite: AST180A

This is the second part of the engine performance specialty course. Students will learn how to diagnose, adjust, and replace worn, damaged or inoperative components in the air induction, fuel delivery, electronic engine controls and emission controls.
 
Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Perform active tests of actuators using a scan tool. 
  2. Diagnose the causes of emissions or drivability concerns, utilizing stored or active diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs). 
  3. Inspect and test fuel pump(s) and pump control system for pressure, regulation, and volume. 
  4. Interpret diagnostic trouble codes (DCTs) and scan tool data related to the emissions control systems. 
 
 

AST210 THEORY/PRACTICUM: ENGINE REPAIR

Credits: 3
Course Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisite: AST100, AST110

This theory/practicum course builds on AST110, offering students a more in-depth conceptual understanding of engine repair and providing them with the opportunity to apply this knowledge in continually developing their automotive skills.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Remove and reinstall engine assembly with minimal supervision.
  2. Repair problems related to the cylinder head and valve train.
  3. Diagnose and repair cylinder block related faults.
  4. Service cooling and lubrication system.
 
 

AST220 AUTOMOTIVE TRANSMISSION AND TRANSAXLE II

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: AST120

This course will present students with comprehensive theoretical and conceptual information in the area of automatic transmission / transaxle systems; students are also given the opportunity to demonstrate their transmission / transaxle diagnosis and repair knowledge and skill through practical, experiential application.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Diagnose hydraulic pressure concerns.
  2. Perform in-vehicle transmission repairs.
  3. Overhaul transmission.
 
 

AST230 THEORY/PRACTICUM: MANUAL DRIVE TRAIN AND AXLES

Credits: 2
Course Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisite: AST100, AST130

This theory/practicum course builds on AST130, offering students a more in-depth conceptual understanding of manual drive trains and axles, and providing them with the opportunity to apply this knowledge in continually developing their automotive skills.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Perform general transmission and transaxle diagnostics with minimal supervision.
  2. Replace clutch pack components.
  3. Remove, disassemble, repair, and reinstall transmission, transaxle, and differential assemblies.
  4. Service and Repair drive shafts, half shafts, and constant velocity joints.
 
 

AST240 THEORY/PRACTICUM: SUSPENSION AND STEERING

Credits: 2
Course Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisite: AST100, AST140

This theory/practicum course builds on AST140, offering students a more in-depth conceptual understanding of suspension and steering, and providing them with the opportunity to apply this knowledge in continually developing their automotive skills.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Perform general suspension and steering systems diagnostics.
  2. Repair steering & suspension system faults.
  3. Adjust wheel alignment angles.
  4. Diagnose and repair wheel & tire failures.
 
 

AST250 THEORY/PRACTICUM: BRAKES

Credits: 2
Course Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisite: AST100, AST150

This theory/practicum course builds on AST150, offering students a more in-depth conceptual understanding of brakes, and providing them with the opportunity to apply this knowledge in continually developing their automotive skills. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Diagnose general brake system malfunctions.
  2. Repair the hydraulic system.
  3. Ascertain and remedy drum brake system failures.
  4. Diagnose and repair disc brake system failures.
  5. Diagnose and repair antilock brake and traction control systems.
 
 

AST260 THEORY/PRACTICUM: ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS

Credits: 4
Course Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisite: AST100, AST160

This is the second Electrical/Electronic Systems specialty course. Students will learn advanced diagnostic and repair procedures offering them an in-depth conceptual understanding of electrical and electronic systems. Students will be offered the opportunity to apply this knowledge in continually developing their automotive skills. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Diagnose (troubleshoot) charging system for causes of undercharge, no-charge, or overcharge conditions. 
  2. Repair starting and charging system faults. 
  3. Determine the cause(s) of excessive key-off battery drain (parasitic draw). 
 
 

AST270 THEORY/PRACTICUM: HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING

Credits: 2
Course Offering: Fall Only
Prerequisite: AST100, AST170

This theory/practicum course builds on AST170, offering students a more in-depth conceptual understanding of heating and air conditioning systems, and providing them with the opportunity to apply this knowledge in continually developing their automotive skills.
 
Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Perform advance diagnostics on air conditioning and heating systems.
  2. Replace air conditioning and heating system components with minimal supervision.
  3. Diagnose and repair operating and control system.
 
 

AST280 THEORY/PRACTICUM: ENGINE PERFORMANCE

Credits: 5
Course Offering: Spring Only
Prerequisite: AST100, AST180A, AST180B

This theory/practicum course builds on AST180A and AST180B, offering students a more in-depth conceptual understanding of engine performance, and providing them with the opportunity to apply this knowledge in continually developing their automotive skills.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Perform advance engine performance diagnostics.
  2. Locate faults in the computerized control system with minimal supervision.
  3. Diagnose and repair ignition, fuel, air induction, and exhaust related problems with minimal supervision.

Early Childhood Development (CD)

CD110 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION ORIENTATION

Credits: 3

The course provides an overview of entry-level knowledge and skills in the early childhood education field. The course also covers developmentally appropriate practices (DAP) in early childhood, careers, employment skills, and opportunities for those entering the early childhood education field.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Differentiate among the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive developmental domains related to early childhood.
  2. Integrate activities and components of a developmentally appropriate learning environment for young children.
  3. Produce a written Student Education Plan based on exploration of various careers in early childhood education. 
 
 

CD140 NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL HEALTH

Credits: 3

This course provides students with strategies to promote nutrition and physical health of young children in early childhood settings. Topics include developmentally and age appropriate meal planning, scheduling, and physical activities.   

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate strategies that promote children’s nutrition. 
  2. Design age appropriate physical activities for young children from birth to eight years of age.
  3. Create healthy and balanced meal plans for young children.
 
 

CD180 LANGUAGE ARTS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD

Credits: 3

Students will develop knowledge and skills of language development in young children, including oral and written language. Emphasis is placed on planning and implementation of activities which enhance and develop language and literacy skills. In addition, students will develop resources and materials that are appropriate to teach language arts to young children.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast the language development theories of Skinner, Chomsky, Gesell, Piaget, and Vygotsky as it relates to ages birth through eight years.
  2. Create activities that build literacy skills.
  3. Implement a lesson plan for young children which develops and enhances language skills.
 
 

CD221 CHILD GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT

Credits: 3

This course provides students with an overview of the interrelationship between physical, emotional, cognitive, language and social growth in young children from conception through the primary school years. Topics include prenatal care, brain research, and the effects of heredity and environment. The roles of the family, culture, community and society and how they impact development is also explored.
 
Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the social, physical, and cognitive development of children birth to age eight.
  2. Explain factors that promote a healthy pregnancy and first few years of life.
  3. Describe the impact of family, culture, community and society on development.
 
 

CD240 COGNITIVE & CREATIVE DEVELOPMENT IN EARLY CHILDHOOD

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CD221 or ED220

In this course, students will plan and implement developmentally appropriate practices that promote the cognitive and creative domains of development in young children birth to age eight. Topics include science, mathematics, cognitive, creative, visual and performing arts, and literacy.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Incorporate creativity in all content areas of developmentally appropriate early childhood environments through original lesson plan design.
  2. Plan, write, and implement creative lessons and activities for young children that incorporate cognitive and creative goals aligned with Guam Early Learning Guidelines, Common Core, and/or Guam Dept. of Education standards.
  3. Demonstrate current practices and methods for teaching science, mathematics, cognitive, creative, arts, and literacy.
 
 

CD260 SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CD110 

This course teaches skills needed to promote social and emotional development in young children and use positive guidance strategies to handle inappropriate behavior. Temperament, parenting styles, and child rearing issues such as feeding, potty training, and tantrums are a few of the topics covered. This course also provides students opportunities to plan and implement activities that promote children’s self-concept, emotional, social and pro-social development. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge in the domains of social and emotional development in young children.
  2. Plan and implement a lesson plan which promotes self-concept, self-esteem, self-regulation, emotional, social and/or pro-social development.
  3. Apply skills in using positive guidance strategies in an early childhood education setting to include adult modeling and conflict resolution.
 
 

CD285 CHILDCARE MANAGEMENT 

Credits: 3

This course provides students with an overview of local requirements for starting and managing a profitable childcare business on Guam. Students will learn financing, marketing, staff supervision, staff training, writing policies, licensing requirements, quality rating improvement systems and operating procedures.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify current laws and regulations controlling the child care industry and different agencies responsible for licensing early childhood (EC) programs on Guam.. .
  2. Develop childcare facility policies to ensure safety and compliance with local regulations.
  3. Conduct an observation of a child care center facility on Guam using the Environmental Rating Scale. 
 
 

CD292 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PRACTICUM

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Department Chair approval

This course provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate professionalism and employ reflective practices while working and/or volunteering 135 hours in an early childhood (birth to third grade setting) under the supervision of a mentor. Practicum students will be required to assist in the classroom as needed which may include conducting observations and assessments, attending meetings, creating a conducive learning environment, and implementing age-appropriate activities. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Advocate appropriate practices for children, model professionalism, and demonstrate ethical conduct based on guidelines from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).
  2. Communicate with students, staff and families including those from diverse backgrounds and special populations.
Implement various developmentally and age-appropriate teaching, assessment and guidance strategies needed to effectively work with young children from birth to age eight.

 
 

CD293 EARLY CHILDHOOD CDA PRACTICUM

Credits: 12

This course integrates 480 hours of experience working with young children in an infant-toddler or preschool setting, and preparation of a Child Development Associate (CDA) Professional Portfolio. It covers the emotional, physical, intellectual, and social development of children birth to five years old and is designed to prepare students to successfully fulfill the requirements for the CDA credential. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Complete 480 practicum hours in an early childhood setting that serves children ages birth to five years old while attending to The National Association for the Education of Young Children’s Code of Ethics.
  2. Create a professional portfolio as required by the CDA credentialing program’s guidelines (https://www.cdacouncil.org/credentials/apply -for-cda). 
  3. Implement developmentally and age-appropriate teaching strategies in an early childhood program. 

Civil Engineering Technology (CE)

CE121 PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS

Credits: 3

This course is a study of the mechanical, thermal, electrical, and chemical properties of metals, alloys, plastics, and other nonmetallic materials used in construction.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. List all the types of materials used in the building construction field.
  2. Describe basic properties that differentiae the various types of building material.
  3. Identify the correct application for any given material used in the construction industry.
 
 

CE210 STATICS

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: MA161B and SI141

Statics is the study of bodies at rest - in a state of balance with their surroundings. Through the applications of the principles of statics, several questions emerge: What load will the column have to support? What is the tension of the bridge cable? What is the mechanical advantage of the block and tackle? Statics is an analytical subject and it makes extensive use of mathematics in all of its forms: Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Successfully apply Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry as needed when solving problems.
  2. Identify and describe key concepts of Force Systems, Center of Gravity, Equilibrium, Force Analysis of Structures, Friction, and Movement.
  3. Identify and analyze given information and data and employ proper procedures and formulas to solve problems.
  4. Solve problems using appropriate technology. 
 
 

CE211 PLANE SURVEYING I

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: MA161B  
 
A beginning course in surveying techniques designed to give the student an understanding of the fundamentals of chaining, leveling, and proper use of the transit. Care and adjustment of instruments and office procedure are also considered. Provision is made by appropriate fieldwork for practical application of the techniques learned.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the fundamentals of chaining, leveling, and use of transit as it relates to plane surveying.
  2. Properly care, adjust, and use equipment in the plane surveying field.
  3. Given a set of tasks, demonstrate proper use and application of surveying equipment and tools.
 
 

CE213 HYDRAULICS

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: MA161B and SI141

This course is designed to present the basic principles to fluid mechanics and the application of those principles to practical applied problems. Students will develop skills in the solution of problems involving fluid statics, flow of fluids in pipes, open channel flow, flow measurement, and forces developed by fluids in motion. The course will also educate students in water treatment practices and community water systems components. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and describe basic fluid mechanics principles.
  2. Analyze water treatment operations and generate solutions to problems.
  3. Solve problems using appropriate tools including logic, models and applicable formulas.
  4. Apply knowledge by functioning as an aide to a civil engineer or a sanitary engineer in the design of ducts, piping and channels for irrigation systems.
 
 

CE214 STRUCTURAL DESIGN

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CE221

This course will acquaint the student with all the facts of concrete and structural steel design. This includes having the student become familiar with various structural members of bridges and buildings and provisions of AISC (American Institute of Steel construction) and ACI (American Concrete Institute) publications in designing steel and concrete structural members. The first part of the course deals with structural steel design; the latter portion deals with concrete structural design. Various structural members are addressed- first as to their functions and second as to types of loading. The publications and specifications of AISC are closely followed to include the use of tables and design aids. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply provisions of AISC and ACI publications in designing steel and concrete structural members.
  2. Identify and make use of appropriate tables and design aids as required.
  3. Apply knowledge by functioning as an aide to an architect or an engineer in the design of structural members.
 
 

CE215 CONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES

Credits: 3

A study of construction organization, building codes, foundations, construction materials, methods and techniques of cast-in-place reinforced concrete, precast and pre-stressed concrete, steel and masonry construction, wood and plastics, thermal and moisture protection and building equipment.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the difference between precast and post stress concrete.
  2. Describe the process involving the construction of a building foundation.
  3. Chronologically sequence the steps related to the construction process.
 
 

CE221 STRENGTH OF MATERIALS

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CE210

A study of the relationship between the stresses, strains, deformations, and loads applied to structural members. Axial, torsional, bending and combined stresses are discussed. Stability and the buckling of columns are introduced.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the strengths and limitations of various types of building materials.
  2. Discuss the testing process involved in determining stress, strains, deformations, and loads.
  3. Explain typical applications for various types of construction materials.
 
 

CE222 PLANE SURVEYING II

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CE211  
 
This course is a continuation of Plane Surveying I dealing with modern surveying including construction surveying and surveying for engineering design. The students are introduced to modern surveying technology including Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Reconnaissance and field procedures and methods are discussed and the students will be divided into survey teams and given area assignments to perform survey fieldwork including topographic surveys for contour maps. The students are exposed to the prospects of employment as survey and civil engineering technicians.
 
Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Successfully apply Mathematics including Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry as needed to solve surveying problems.
  2. Demonstrate a variety of surveying techniques.
  3. Apply appropriate skills using proper surveying instruments given various surveying tasks.
  4. Solve surveying problems using technology such as calculators or computers, total stations, global positioning systems, or leveling instruments as appropriate.
 
 

CE224 HIGHWAYS

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: MA161A, CE211, and CE213

This course introduces the different aspects of Traffic and Highway Engineering and the potential employment opportunities in the field. This course provides an overview of the relevance of roadway transportation in our society, introduces basic concepts of Highway Safety, Traffic Engineering, Level of Service, Intersection Design, Signal Timing, Transportation Planning, Forecasting Travel Demand, the Environmental Process in roadway projects, Geometric Design, Roadway Drainage, Roadway Geotechnical Engineering, and Pavement Design. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe current state of the art and science of Highway Engineering.
  2. Apply the concept of Level of Service in highways and intersections.
  3. Solve problems of Signal Timing.
  4. Solve problems relating to basic roadway design.
  5. Solve problems involving pavement design.
 
 

CE225 CONSTRUCTION PLANNING & ESTIMATING

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: AE121, CE215, and MA161A

This course covers methods of estimating construction costs including excavation, highway, structures, piling and foundations; methods to determine qualities of materials, equipment, labor, and money required for construction projects; characteristics and capabilities of work equipment; methods of obtaining unit cost of in place construction; and field reporting practices and responsibilities of field inspection.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Determine costs needed for various construction projects.
  2. Estimate the amount of time required to complete a given construction project.
  3. Apply critical thinking to determine labor hours versus equipment costs versus material costs.

CHamoru Language (CH)

CH110 CHAMORU I

Credits: 4

This is a CHamoru language immersion course for beginners. Students will spend the semester learning to communicate in CHamoru through activity-based exercises on topics such as greetings, self-description, and home and work life. The focus of this class is on listening and comprehending. Students will also engage in activities that promote language revitalization.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Comprehend basic conversations inCHamoru on very familiar topics.
  2. Enunciate and ask common questions and respond to such questions inCHamoru. 
  3. Report on language and cultural revitalization efforts on island. 
 
 

CH111 CHAMORU II

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: CH110

This CHamoru language immersion course for novices is a continuation of CH110. Students will spend the semester communicating in CHamoru through storytelling, description, and conversation. The focus of this class is on listening, comprehending, and speaking. Students will also engage in activities that promote language revitalization. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Engage in simple conversations in CHamoru on familiar topics. 
  2. Tell short stories in CHamoru with visual aids. 
  3. Discuss language revitalization efforts on island and their connection to culture. 
 
 

CH200 IMMERSION METHODS FOR CHAMORU LANGUAGE TEACHING I

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CH111

This course introduces students to foundational skills for teaching CHamoru language using the immersion method. Students will explore examples of immersion teaching, guiding principles, lesson
plan development, and assessment from a practical approach. A major focus of the course is creating
authentic contents for learning CHamoru in efforts to develop fluent CHamoru speakers over time.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Teach CHamoru language and culture using immersive techniques.
  2. Create an immersion-based lesson plan that reflects authentic literacy skills in the CHamoru language.
  3. Value immersive instruction as a method of perpetuating CHamoru language and culture.

Intelligence Analysis (CHLS)

CHLS102 INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS AND SECURITY MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3

This course examines intelligence analysis and its indispensable relationship to the security management of terrorist attacks, man-made disasters and natural disasters. It also explores vulnerabilities of our national defense and private sectors, as well as the threats posed to these institutions by terrorists, man-made disasters, and natural disasters. Students will discuss substantive issues regarding intelligence support of homeland security measures implemented by the United States and explore how the intelligence community operates.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate operational knowledge of intelligence gathering and analysis pertinent to homeland security and other threats facing government and private sectors. 
  2. Outline basic intelligence policies and functions of the United States Government.
  3. Articulate the meaning and purpose for the Intelligence Reform & Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004.

Criminal Justice (CJ)

CJ100 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Credits: 3

This course offers an overview of the criminal justice system from its early historical development to its evolution within the United States. It also identifies the various agencies of justice-law enforcement, courts, corrections, and the juvenile justice system, their functions, expectations and interrelationships.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the history and development of the Criminal Justice System.
  2. Identify the role of the Criminal Justice System in contemporary society.
  3. Describe the functions of law enforcement, courts and corrections.
  4. Describe the functions of probation, parole and the Juvenile Justice System.
 
 

CJ101 JUVENILE JUSTICE PROCESS

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CJ100, EN110 placement or equivalent

This course is designed to provide students with a fundamental understanding of the history, philosophy, and practical application of the American Juvenile Justice System. Students will examine the juvenile justice responsibilities of police, courts, and juvenile corrections with additional emphasis on current practices of Juvenile Justice agencies in Guam.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the history, philosophy, and development of the Juvenile Justice System.
  2. Identify and distinguish the various components of the Juvenile Justice System.
  3. Apply Title 19 Guam Code Annotated, Chapter 5, The Family Court Act, to hypothetical situations.
 
 

CJ102 FIRST RESPONDER

Credits: 3

The First Responder course shall be at least 48 hours of classroom training. It aims to provide training in emergency medical care for those who are apt to be the first person responding to an accident. When the course is completed, the student will possess the same knowledge of patient care as the EMT, but not the same equipment skills. Can be repeated for credit.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Diagnose emergency situations and provide appropriate emergency treatment.
  2. Explain and discuss the role of a First Responder.
  3. Demonstrate the First Responder skill set at an acceptable level as required by local regulations.
  4. Demonstrate proficiency in BLS and CPR by passing the final skills practical exams and written exam required by the DOT to become a certified First Responder.
 
 

CJ104 DYNAMICS OF SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Credits: 3

This course is designed to introduce students to the problems of substance abuse in our society. Students will examine the history of dangerous drug use, basic pharmacology and classification, the social impact of drug abuse, physical and psychological consequences of drug use and dependence, various treatment modalities, legal implications of illicit drug use, and current law enforcement efforts.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Articulate the medical, social and/or psychological aspects of addiction.
  2. Demonstrate understanding of the different schedules under the Controlled Substances Act.
  3. Identify and apply the detection, suppression, apprehension and prosecution procedures of substance abuse violations.
 
 

CJ107 INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS

Credits: 3

An introduction and overview of fundamental processes, trends, and practices of juvenile and adult probation, institutional treatment, parole, and contemporary community-based correctional programs, both public and private will be covered in this course.  Included is a review of the history and philosophy of corrections, with emphasis on the constitutional rights of offenders.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain and analyze the correctional process, the correctional system, and the role of corrections in contemporary society.
  2. Evaluate the history and evolution of the correctional process.
  3. Identify the various correctional systems.
  4. Examine the administration and trends in corrections.
 
 

CJ122 INTRODUCTION TO FORENSIC SCIENCE

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: CJ100

Cross lListed as SI122. This course introduces students to the field of forensic science. Students will be able to identify the various principles, methods and procedures used in the preservation, collection, processing, and investigation of the crime scene as well as identify the various scientific techniques used to evaluate and analyze the evidence to resolve criminal matters. Students will also be familiar with some of the legal and ethical issues in forensic science.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the history and development of forensic science.
  2. Identify the role of forensic science within the criminal justice system.
  3. Identify the various analytical tools used to evaluate, process, investigate and adjudicate criminal cases.
  4. Describe the various scientific techniques used to preserve, collect and analyze evidence.
  5. Identify some of the legal and ethical issues in forensic science.
 
 

CJ126 OFFICER SURVIVAL

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Instructor permission

This course provides law enforcement academy recruits with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform a variety of police tasks safely and effectively. This course is designed for career public safety officers and recruits. Instructor permission is required.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the safety techniques to use when approaching a potentially dangerous or life-threatening situation.
  2. List street survival skills an officer should acquire while on duty.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to apply officer safety and street survival skills at an acceptable level in mock situations.
 
 

CJ126L OFFICER SURVIVAL LABORATORY

Credits: 1
Prerequisite: CJ126

This course provides students with the opportunity to practice and demonstrate “hands on” application of survival skills learned in CJ126. The laboratory may be conducted by interested law enforcement agencies at the conclusion of the Basic Law Enforcement Academy. This course is designed for career public safety officers and recruits. Instructor permission is required.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Practice the various officer safety and street survival skills in mock situations.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of the various officer safety and street survival skills at acceptable levels.
 
 

CJ132 EMERGENCY VEHICLE OPERATOR COURSE (EVOC)

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Permission by CJ Advisor/Department Chair

This course is restricted to students enrolled the Criminal Justice Academy or Law Enforcement Cycle. It prepares students and fire recruits to safely operate emergency vehicles used by their respective agencies. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify major components of an emergency response vehicle.
  2. Explain the local and federal laws governing the operations in responding to emergency situations.
  3. Utilize basic emergency vehicle operator skills during controlled, emergency response scenarios.
 
 

CJ135 FIREARMS USE/SAFETY/CARE

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Current firearms identification card

This course is restricted to students enrolled in the Criminal Justice Academy or Law Enforcement Cycle. It is designed to teach students the proper use and care of firearms. Emphasis is placed on safety, use of deadly force, marksmanship, judgmental shooting, and the care and cleaning of weapons.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the physical attributes and mechanics of a firearm.
  2. Apply basic firearm safety techniques. 
  3. Identify the various laws related to firearms use.  
  4. Practice safe use of firearms within a controlled environment.
  5. Demonstrate use of firearms at prevailing acceptable and passing levels.
 
 

CJ140 DEFENSIVE TACTICS

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Instructor permission

Stressing control through verbal persuasion is strongly preferred to physical force. This course is especially designed to control prisoners and maximize protection of the public, corrections officers, and inmates. Physical fitness is emphasized. This course is designed for career public safety officers and recruits. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Perform control and self-defense tactics.
  2. Demonstrate understanding of prevention, intervention and resolution techniques.
  3. Demonstrate how to apply the use of force and the continuum of force.
  4. Explain the legal issues involved in handling persons in custody, detainees, prisoners and inmates.
 
 

CJ145 PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Instructor permission

This course is designed to develop a positive attitude toward physical fitness and to understand the relationship between physical fitness, productivity, health, and safety. This course is designed for career public safety officers and recruits. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Develop a positive attitude toward physical fitness.
  2. Demonstrate understanding of the relationship between physical fitness, productivity, health, and safety.
  3. Participate in physical development exercises.
  4. Demonstrate the use of the various physical development exercises.
 
 

CJ148 TRAFFIC LAW ENFORCEMENT

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CJ100, CJ150

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary in the identification and enforcement of Guam’s traffic law enforcement duties. Students will be acquainted with the terminology, facts and concepts of pedestrian, bicycle and motor vehicle violations to include an understanding of Title 16 Guam Code Annotated, the Vehicle Code of Guam. Additionally, students will be able to recognize what immediate steps are required at a traffic related scene necessary to protect life and property, how to give traffic citations, how to deal with DDUI offender cases, how to operate radar and laser devices, and how to conduct traffic direction and accident investigation.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Interpret and apply Title 16, Guam Code Annotated (the Vehicle Code of Guam) and related statutes to hypothetical situations. Explain the various traffic statutes and offenses.
  2. Demonstrate the use operations, and limitations of radar laser and other traffic enforcement devices. 
  3. Demonstrate Guam Police Department (GPD) protocols concerning the enforcement of Guam’s Safe Street Act laws including DUI Checkpoint Procedures, DUI Traffic Stops, Field Sobriety and Breathalyzer Testing and Arrest and Post-Arrest protocols. 
  4. Demonstrate GPD Red-Light Running and Buckle-Down Protocols. 
 
 

CJ150 CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CJ100, EN110 placement or equivalent

This course provides an overview of the criminal justice process, the court system, and the U.S. Constitution with emphasis on the method of case interpretation of the U.S. Supreme Court and the Criminal Procedure Code of Guam.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the various legal sources that establish the basic rights of individuals accused or convicted of crimes in the United States.
  2. Describe the various stages and established procedures of the American Criminal Justice System.
  3. Identify landmark US Supreme Court and other appellate court decisions that impact the criminal justice process.
  4. Apply and demonstrate the use of the Guam Law and case law to hypothetical situations.
 
 

CJ200 CRIMINAL LAW

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CJ100, EN110 placement or equivalent

This course is designed to introduce students to the history, philosophy, and application of U.S. Federal and Guam criminal laws. It provides students with an understanding of crime classifications, matters affecting criminal responsibility, criminal statutes including those of Guam, and the role of criminal law in contemporary society.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the origin and evolution of U.S.  Criminal Laws and the U.S. Federal and Guam/State Court Systems and their relationship to each other.
  2. Identify the basic principles of Criminal Law.
  3. Distinguish the elements of various common law and statutory crimes.
  4. Apply Guam’s substantive criminal laws under the Guam Code Annotated (GCA) to hypothetical situations.
 
 

CJ204 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CJ100, SO130 or PY120

This course provides a fundamental understanding of criminal behavior, crime topologies, and the various theories of crime causation. Students will also explore the efforts of society to remedy, correct, and prevent crime and delinquency. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the role of the criminal justice system in criminology.
  2. Compare and contrast major theories of crime causation and typologies.
  3. Explain the evolution of criminology as it relates to the current criminal justice system.
 
 

CJ205 REPORT WRITING FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Instructor approval and placement into EN110 or equivalent

This course is designed to emphasize the key principles and techniques in the development of various types of report writing for law enforcement professionals.  Report writing proficiency will focus upon evidence gathering, report organization, sentence and content development. Formerly CJ205 Police Report Writing. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Organize relevant information to write an effective report.
  2. Differentiate amongst the various types of evidence required for different law enforcement report forms.
  3. Demonstrate writing techniques for effective report writing.
 
 

CJ206 SOCIAL VALUES & THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROCESS

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: SO130

This course is designed to provide an in-depth exploration consistent with the philosophy that social value and ethics are basic principles of a sound criminal justice process, and the roles of the administration of justice practitioners in relation to the public they serve. Through interaction and study, the student will become aware of the interrelations and role expectations of the human dimension required by practitioners in developing empathy, sensitivity and acceptable behavior. Instruction on the importance of open communication and accountability to those within and without the justice process is explored. Permission from instructor and/or advisor is required.
 
Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain and analyze community-based philosophy of policing.
  2. Demonstrate understanding of the role of police and professionalism.
  3. Identify the various ethical issues of policing.
  4. Identify how political, social, and economic issues relate to law enforcement.
 
 

CJ209 CONCEPT OF POLICE OPERATIONS

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CJ100, EN110 placement or equivalent

This course provides students with operational knowledge needed to function successfully in a modern police agency. Concepts are particularly useful for first-line supervisors and managers. Topics include effective supervision, communication skills, problem solving, time management, motivation and morale, effective discipline, interpersonal conflict, stress management, productivity issues, and performance appraisals. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain and evaluate the structure, organization, and management of police or other law enforcement agency.
  2. Explain and analyze the various types of police operations and the methods and strategies used to implement policies and other executive decisions.
  3. Demonstrate understanding of the interrelations, role, conflict and trends of police and law enforcement in modern society.
 
 

CJ225 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CJ100 and CJ205 or advisor permission

This course provides students with the knowledge and technical skills necessary to successfully investigate crime scenes, identify suspects, and successfully present evidence in court. Skills learned and practiced include processing crime scenes, preserving and evaluating evidence collected, interviewing witnesses and suspects, case preparation, and presenting evidence in court.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply the various methods used in investigating criminal cases to hypothetical situations.
  2. Explain and evaluate the investigation, processing, and preservation of a crime scene.
  3. Identify and analyze the various methods used to obtain information.
 
 

CJ250 POLICE ORGANIZATIONAL THEORY

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CJ100, EN110 placement or equivalent

This course examines and analyzes the traditional concepts, techniques, policies and operating systems in the police component of the criminal justice system. Basic knowledge of the police organizational function, structure, processes, and behavior is emphasized. Theories related to the practice applied to the administration of justice process and the comprehension of administrative phenomena is explored. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply the various management theories and styles.
  2. Explain and evaluate the structure and organization of police and other law enforcement agencies.
  3. Identify and analyze the concepts of leadership, decision making, accountability, responsibility, and liability.
 
 

CJ292 CRIMINAL JUSTICE PRACTICUM

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CJ100, CJ150, CJ200

This course is a capstone for the Associate of Science Degree in Criminal Justice and a required course for the Certificate in Criminal Justice. In addition, this course allows students first hand, practical experience in observing and participating in the daily operations of an agency in a criminal justice related field. the principles, theories and methodologies acquired in the Criminal Justice courses will be applied to actual situations. The experience will create an awareness for specific problems encountered in a particular criminal justice related agency to further acquaint the student with terminology, facts and conceptions relating to that agency and to develop within the student an understanding of the importance of that agency's roles in the criminal justice process. Supervised work experience affords students the opportunity to develop skills necessary to succeed in the Criminal Justice field.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Integrate classroom knowledge and theories with outside work experience.
  2. Develop practical work-related skills.
  3. Explain the operations of a criminal justice related agency.
  4. Practice the daily operations policy of a criminal justice related agency.

Cosmetology (CM)

CM101 COSMETOLOGY I 

Credits: 10

The primary purpose of this course is for students to acquire basic manipulative skills in shampooing, haircutting, nail care, and skin care with compliance to infection control and all safety operations in order to obtain licensure and competency in entry-level positions required in the field of cosmetology. Students will have the opportunity to complete 450 hours of in-class and salon practices under the supervision of a licensed cosmetologist. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Perform analytical skills to determine the desired look for a client’s hair, skin, and nails. 
  2. Apply entry level cosmetology techniques for hair, skin, and nails. 
  3. Adhere to the Guam Board of Cosmetology’s Rules and Regulations while performing cosmetology services. 
  4. Utilize proper sanitation and safety guidelines during all services rendered.
 
 

CM102 COSMETOLOGY II

Credits: 10
Prerequisite: CM101

CM102 Cosmetology II This lecture/lab course is offered in the second semester of the program. It includes instruction in haircutting, hair coloring, chemical texture, principles of hair design, hairstyling, and pedicure services.  Successful completion of this course will help students reach the goal of obtaining licensure and competency in entry-level positions required in the field of cosmetology. Students will have the opportunity to complete 450 hours of in-class and salon practices under the supervision of a licensed cosmetologist.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Perform procedures in various haircutting, styling, chemical texture, and hair coloring services to a client’s satisfaction.
  2. Model basic nail services in a class and/or salon setting, to include foot and leg massage. 
  3. Demonstrate procedures to perform various haircutting, styling, chemical texture, and hair coloring services to a costumer's satisfaction.
  4. Apply critical thinking and problem-m solving skills, adhering to the Guam Board of Cosmetology’s Rules and Regulations, while conducting cosmetology services.   
 
 

CM104A COSMETOLOGY III

Credits: 5
Prerequisite: CM102

This course emphasizes skills introduced and practiced in CM101 Cosmetology I and CM102 Cosmetology II, to develop in a salon/lab environment. Students will gain experience in a salon open to the public and is designed to give the students the opportunity to further enhance their cosmetology skills. The level of performance rendered, is at a minimum competency needed for an entry-level skilled position in the field of cosmetology (450 clock hours). Students may recover clock hours via a Continuing Education CM192 Cosmetology Lab (5 credit) course. If a student is not present by the end of the second day of class they may be dropped. Formerly CM104. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the skills and knowledge needed for hair coloring, chemical texture, basic styling, nail, and skin care services in a salon setting.
  2. Practice appropriate customer service skills when performing cosmetology services in a salon setting.
  3. Apply test taking strategies in preparation for the Guam Board of Barbering and Cosmetology exam to be a licensed cosmetologist.
 
 

CM104B COSMETOLOGY IV

Credits: 5
Prerequisite: CM104A

This course builds on skills practiced in CM104A Cosmetology III to develop a mastery skill level in a salon/lab environment. The focus of this course is to prepare the student to successfully apply and pass The National Cosmetology Practical Examination. The College’s salon is designed to give the students the opportunity to perfect their cosmetology skills. The level of performance rendered, is above the minimum needed for an entry-level skilled position in the field of cosmetology (450 clock hours). Students will practice practical and written exam scenarios to prepare for The National –Interstate Council of State Boards of Cosmetology Examination in order to obtain a Guam license to qualify for positions in the cosmetology field.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate excellent customer service practices and adherence to safety guidelines.
  2. Apply essential skills needed to implement services in a salon setting based on the content domains of the National Cosmetology Practical Examination.
  3. Demonstrate preparedness to pass the written and practical cosmetology exam, based on The National –Interstate Council of State Boards of Cosmetology (NIC) and Guam Board of Barbering and Cosmetology (GBBC).

Communications (CO)

CO110 CRITICAL THINKING FOR CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: EN110 placement or equivalent

This course provides students with the opportunity to practice fundamental thinking skills for approaching real-world challenges. Students will learn to approach civic and interpersonal challenges by evaluating evidence in order to develop solutions and draw informed conclusions.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the importance of civic engagement in our region and local community.
  2. Analyze arguments in various contexts.
  3. Explain an issue or problem using clear and direct language. 
  4. Formulate a sound argument to advance a specific solution for a real-world challenge. 
 
 

CO125 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN COMMUNICATION AND SPEECH 

Credits: 3    
Prerequisite: Placement into EN110 or equivalent

In this course, students will apply communication theories, concepts and skills to their own real-world experiences. The goal is to develop students’ self-awareness, understanding of culture, and communication skills for more effective communication in a variety of contexts. Students will also prepare and present speeches. Formerly EN125.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate listening and information gathering skills.
  2. Explain the role of culture in communication. 
  3. Apply communication skills through actual applications.
  4. Develop and deliver speeches for a variety of purposes.

Computer Science (CS)

CS101 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SYSTEMS & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Credits: 3

This course provides students with an overview of computer technology, computer hardware and software, data communications, Internet resources, programming concepts and other technologies that are an integral part of everyday life.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply knowledge of computer systems and information technology such as history, terminology, algorithms, and other basic concepts. 
  2. Choose the proper application to produce a desired result.
  3. Navigate the Internet using a variety of resource tools.
 
 

CS102 COMPUTER OPERATIONS 

Credits: 3

This course features hands-on experience in multiprogramming computer systems with various I/O devices.  Operation procedures are given on the data entry stations, workstations, diskette drives, and system printers.  Students learn control commands of display and console stations, control command statements, supplied procedures, utility programs, and program products.  They are also introduced to the organization of a data processing center and its operations procedures.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Operate single user and multi-user operating systems. 
  2. Use system utilities at the basic level on AS/400.
  3. Create a simple menu system using Command Language (CL) program and Screen Design Aid (SDA).
 
 

CS103 REPORT PROGRAM GENERATOR (RPG)

Credits: 3

This course provides the student with the programming concepts and techniques necessary to solve business type problems. Students will learn program logic. They are also taught how to code, compile, test, debug, and execute programs. RPG (Report Program Generator) is the programming language used in this course.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Comprehend basic syntax and command structure of RPG.
  2. Properly use commands to create programs to solve problems.
  3. Debug programs to find syntax and logical errors.
 
 

CS104 VISUAL BASIC PROGRAMMING

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CS101

This course covers the introductory fundamentals of the Visual Basic programming language. Students will learn object oriented and event-driven programming concepts and develop applications using Visual Basic. Permission from instructor and/or from a computer science advisor is required.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe basic syntax and command structure of Visual Basic Programming.
  2. Properly use commands to create programs to solve problems.
  3. Debug programs to find syntax and logical errors.
 
 

CS110 INTRODUCTION TO THE INTERNET

Credits: 3

This course introduces the student to the basic concepts of the Internet and explores the latest online tools and technologies.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Use a variety of Internet tools to connect, communicate, and interact online.
  2. Evaluate information obtained online for reliability.
  3. Explain positive and negative social issues when using the Internet.
 
 

CS112 INTRODUCTION TO LINUX

Credits: 3
Course Offering: Fall

Introduction to Linux course presents students with an open source alternative to Windows operating system. This course discusses installation, simple administrations, and usage of Linux systems as both workstation and server. Questions about where to find, how to install and configure, and how to use open source software will be covered. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify practical differences between Windows and Linux operating systems.
  2. Install a Linux workstation and perform a simple configuration.
  3. Use Linux system for everyday purposes.
 
 

CS151 WINDOWS APPLICATIONS

Credits: 3

The students will learn fundamental nature of microcomputers: the hardware devices that make up the physical machine, the operating systems, and the major types of application software. Students are exposed to the concepts and applications of the word processing, graphics, desktop publishing, spreadsheet, database, and communications software. They are shown the far reaching effects of computers and technology, and the applications that computers have to their own lives. Finally, the course provides students hands-on experience with real world applications using the Windows environment and the application software for Windows: Word Processing, Spreadsheet, Database and Presentation. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand the basic functionality of Microsoft Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint.
  2. Apply knowledge of Microsoft applications in completion of projects and activities. 
  3. Integrate use of Microsoft applications in the Windows environment. 
 
 

CS152 MACINTOSH APPLICATIONS

Credits: 3

The students will learn fundamental nature of microcomputers: the hardware devices that make up the physical machine, the operating systems, and the major types of application software. Students are exposed to the concepts and applications of the word processing, graphics, desktop publishing, spreadsheet, database, and communicationscommunications software. They are shown the far reachingfar-reaching effects of computers and technology, and the applications that computers have to their own lives. Finally, the course provides students hands-on experience with real world applications using the Macintosh environment and the application software for Macintosh: Word Processing, Spreadsheet, Database and Presentation.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand the basic functionality of Microsoft Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint.
  2. Apply knowledge of Microsoft applications in completion of projects and activities. 
  3. Integrate use of Microsoft applications in the Macintosh environment.
 
 

CS202 COBOL

Credits: 3

 The purpose of the course is to teach computer programming in COBOL (Common Business Oriented Language). A number of practical programs are written. Program problems deal with processing small volume of data using workstation keyboard and large volume of data using the printer and disk/diskette drives. Printer output includes titles, headings, vertical and horizontal spacing, etc. Statements of input/output, data manipulation, arithmetic, conditional, and procedure branching are covered. Arrays and subscripts, tables, subroutines, files, and other COBOL features are also discussed.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Comprehend basic syntax and command structure of COBOL.
  2. Properly use commands to create programs to solve problems.
  3. Debug programs to find syntax and logical errors.
 
 

CS203 SYSTEMS ANALYSIS & DESIGN

Credits: 3

This course offers a practical, streamlined, and updated approach to information technology systems analysis and design. Students will learn how to translate business requirements into information systems that support a company’s short-and-long-term objectives by applyi8ng project management concepts, tools, and techniques. Students will understand how IT supports business requirements in today’s intensely competitive environment through emerging technologies, such as agile methods, cloud computing, and mobile applications in systems analysis and design. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the importance of system analysis and design in today’s dynamic business environment.
  2. Use an emerging technology in system analysis and design. 
  3. Manage system implementation of an IT project. 
 
 

CS204 C++ PROGRAMMING

Credits: 3

The purpose of the course is to teach students how to use the C++ programming language. The C++ language concepts and methods to be covered include program development, algorithms, data types, operators, expressions, input/output and files, program control, pointers, functions and macros, variable storage and memory models, arrays, data structures, unions, graphics, and BIOS services. Structured program design will be emphasized.  It is not recommended to be the students' first programming course.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Use basic syntax and command structure of C++ Language.
  2. Properly use commands to create programs to solve problems.
  3. Debug programs to find syntax and logical errors.
 
 

CS205 NETWORK COMMUNICATIONS

Credits: 4

Networking has become the foundation of the modern world. The interconnection of computers, individuals, and society as a whole has become interdependent. The students will obtain the basic knowledge on Local Area Networks (LANs), Wide Area Networks (WANs), the Internet and the Cloud. They will be able to design a simple network such as a local area network.  They will also learn how to keep up with the changing hardware and software and how to maintain networks and expand them as needed. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of how the Internet progresses from how we know it today, and how it will continue to evolve.
  2. Describe the Open Systems Interconnection model (OSI) and how it characterizes and standardizes the internal functions of a networking communication system by partitioning it into 7 abstraction layers.
  3. Design a basic network, make network connections using various access methods and troubleshoot network problems.
 
 

CS206 JAVA I 

Credits: 3

Students who take this course need not have a previous programming background. This course introduces problem-solving methods and algorithm development using the high-level programming language Java. Students will learn to design, code, debug, and document programs using modern engineering techniques in a PC or Linux based environment. By creating and executing Java applications that leverage the object-oriented features of the Java language, such as encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism, students will increase their understanding of how data, classes, objects and methods interact in an object-oriented environment. Students will also implement error-handling techniques using exception handling.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify basic syntax and command structure.
  2. Properly use commands to create programs to solve problems.
  3. Debug programs to find syntax and logical errors.
 
 

CS210A CONFIGURING WINDOWS SYSTEMS

Credits: 3

This course is intended for IT professionals who are interested in expanding their knowledge base and technical skills about Windows 7 client. In this course, students learn how to install, upgrade, and migrate to Windows 7 client. Students then configure Windows 7 client for network connectivity, security, maintenance, and mobile computing. This course helps students prepare for the Microsoft Certification Exam 70-680: Windows 7 Configuring.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Perform a clean installation of Windows 7, upgrade to Windows 7, and migrate user-related data and settings from an earlier version of Windows.
  2. Secure Windows 7 client computers.
  3. Optimize and maintain the performance and reliability of a Windows 7 client computer.
 
 

CS211 JAVASCRIPT PROGRAMMING

Credits: 3

This hands onhands-on course will provide students with the skills to design and develop dynamic, interesting and interactive web pages using JavaScript. The basics of web page creation using Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) will also be introduced.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify JavaScript basic syntax and command structure. 
  2. Create programs using JavaScript programming language. 
  3. Integrate JavaScript with HTML and CSS to create dynamic and animated web pages.
 
 

CS212 PYTHON PROGRAMMING

Credits: 3

Python is a general purposegeneral-purpose interpretive programming language for a broad range of operating systems. Students will learn the basic concepts and techniques of programming with Python.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify Python basic syntax and command structure. 
  2. Create programs using Python programming language. 
  3. Debug Python programs to find syntax and logical errors.
 
 

CS213 PHP PROGRAMMING WITH MYSQL

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CS211

PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor is an open source programming language that is used for developing interactive Web sites. MySQL is an open source relational database that is often used with PHP. Together, PHP and MySQL are becoming one of the most popular technology combinations for Web site development. This course teaches Web development with PHP and MySQL. At the beginning of the course, students will learn how to install Apache, PHP and MySQL open source free software on the computers. This course covers the basic functionality of PHP and MySQL along with introductions to advanced topics, including using PHP and MySQL to integrate object-oriented programming and how to build Web sites that incorporate authentication and security. At the end of the course, students will be able to use PHP and MySQL to build professional, dynamic and database-driven Web sites.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Write a complete program using PHP programming language. 
  2. Create a database using MySQL relational database language.
  3. Build a professional, dynamic and database-driven website using PHP and MySQL.
 
 

CS252 ADVANCED RPG

Credits: 3
Course Offering: Spring
Prerequisite: CS101, CS103

This course provides the students with advanced application techniques in computer programming in the RPG/ILE (Report Language Generator/Integrated Language Environment). The concepts of structured programming and top down design, RPG/ILE advanced statements, and utility programs are taught. The students learn how to apply the above concepts to program planning, program design, coding, presentation, and documentation. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe basic syntax and command structure.
  2. Properly use commands to create programs to solve problems.
  3. Debug programs to find syntax and logical errors.
  4. Integrate the previously covered material into a larger complex system using RPG/ILE, CL (Command Language), SEU (Source Entry Utility), SDA (Screen Design Aid), and IDDU (Interactive Data Definition Utility).
 
 

CS266 ADVANCED JAVA

Credits: 3
Course Offering: Fall
Prerequisite: CS206

This course builds on Java course CS206 or its equivalent and covers advanced programming topics. Designed for the more experienced Java developer, the students are expected to have a good working knowledge of the Java programming language before taking this course. This course introduces students to advanced features and concepts of the Java programming language. Students will learn how to use inheritance, interfaces, exception handling, file input and output, and generic types, and how to incorporate graphical user interfaces (GUIs) into their programming applications. Students will also learn how to apply object-oriented design and programming principles to their programs. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe and apply advanced Java programming language concepts.
  2. Apply advanced object-oriented design techniques and programming skills. 
  3. Use Java advanced features to create full-featured, easy-to-use Java programs and Java applets.
 
 

CS292 COMPUTER SCIENCE PRACTICUM

Credits: 1-6
Prerequisite: Complete at least 18 credits in Major Requirements  
 
This course provides students a supervised work experience where they develop skills necessary to be successful in an information technology position. Formerly CS298.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Obtain supervised work experience to develop skills necessary to succeed in information technology positions.
  2. Demonstrate effective human relation skills with co-workers and subordinates according to the expectations of a supervisor.
  3. Apply principles of personal responsibility and ethical behavior to the community and in the workplace.
 
 

CS299 COMPUTER SCIENCE CAPTSONE

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: CS206

This course covers advanced programming topics. Students are expected to have a good working knowledge of Java, C++, PHP, and other programming languages before taking this course. This course provides students with the opportunity to complete at least three significant programming projects, which emphasize on-project definition, testing, presentation, and implementation. The projects demonstrate the knowledge and skills the students have acquired over the course of completing the Computer Science program.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply knowledge of fundamental algorithms, advanced features and concepts of the programming languages.
  2. Complete and test the fully designed projects.
  3. Deliver technical presentations.

Construction Technology (CT)

CT100 INTRODUCTION TO CONSTRUCTION TRADES

Credits: 3

This course is designed to allow students to explore the construction industry and employment opportunities within a specific field. Students will learn basic construction safety, construction mathematics, hand tools, power tools, communication skills, teamwork, and critical thinking skills needed to succeed in the field of construction. Additionally, students will learn basic information for obtaining a career in each field which includes working conditions, general duties, and potential employment opportunities. Students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the care and maintenance of hand and power tools.
  2. Correctly use safety equipment common in a construction environment.
  3. Differentiate construction related occupations and the roles and responsibilities of each.
  4. Solve job-related problems by adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing numbers using fractions, decimals, whole numbers, ratios and proportions.
 
 

CT140 INDUSTRIAL SAFETY

Credits: 3

In this course, students will learn about concepts and habits regarding safety for the prevention of accidents resulting in personal injury and damage to building facilities and equipment. Students will also gain the knowledge of occupational safety practices, purpose and enforcement of local and federal safety requirements, risk analysis and assessment, and OSHA inspection procedures.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify occupational safety practices.
  2. Differentiate between local and federal safety requirements.
  3. Describe the process for an on-site OSHA inspection.
 
 

CT152 FUNDAMENTALS OF PLUMBING

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: CT100 or taken concurrently

This course introduces students to the use, safety, care, and maintenance of special tools and equipment for basic cold-water supply (pipes, fittings, valves, safety devices, appliances), anddrainage systems (sewers, drains, vents, traps, test, and maintenance). Students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the various plumbing valves and devices.
  2. Explain water distribution and drainage systems.
  3. Demonstrate the safe and proper use of plumbing tools and equipment.
  4. Maintain and repair water and drainage systems.
 
 

CT152A PLUMBING LEVEL I

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: CT152 
  
This course prepares students for an advanced study and experiential development of skills in plumbing. Emphasis will be on commercial plumbing. Students will focus on cast-iron pipefittings, carbon steel pipe and fittings, corrugated stainless steel tubing, fixtures and faucets, drain, waste and vent systems, and water distribution system. Upon completion of this course, students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Illustrate proper installation of various plumbing fixtures.
  2. Illustrate proper installation of pipefittings in residential and commercial settings.
  3. Explain the importance of pipefitting standards, codes, and specifications.
  4. Demonstrate the safe and proper use of plumbing tools and equipment.
  5. Perform water pressure tests on water supply systems.
 
 

CT153 INTRODUCTION TO CARPENTRY

Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the use, care, safe operations and maintenance of hand and power tools. Topics include handling of supplies and materials, construction safety, and construction mathematics. Upon successful completion, students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI)

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Utilize safety procedures in the carpentry profession.
  2. Identify tools, hardware, and equipment in the carpentry profession.
  3. Differentiate between rough and finishing carpentry.
 
 

CT154A MASONRY LEVEL I

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: CT100  
 
This course will introduce students to basic masonry materials, tools, mathematical concepts, and techniques, such as the proper way to mix mortar by hand, lay masonry units, and practice safety precautions. Students will also learn the skills, attitudes, and abilities necessary to become a successful mason. Upon completion of this course, students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe modern masonry materials and techniques. Explain the importance of safety on a jobsite.
  2. Utilize proper techniques to mix mortar and lay masonry units.
  3. Adhere to safety guidelines on a jobsite.
 
 

CT154B MASONRY LEVEL II

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: CT154A

This course builds on content addressed in CT154A and will focus on advanced study in masonry. Students will learn about residential plans and masonry, drawing interpretation, openings and reinforced masonry, metal work, advanced laying techniques, effects of climate on masonry, construction inspection, and quality control. Upon completion of this course, students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe how to construct reinforced walls and masonry elements.
  2. Explain the need for moisture control and the techniques used to eliminate moisture problems.
  3. Interpret the various types of residential drawings.
  4. Analyze how standards and specifications are used to ensure quality control throughout the masonry industry.
 
 

CT158 HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATION

Credits: 3

This course offers training in the maintenance and operations of selected power construction equipment ranging from air compressors to dozers to tractor trailers.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify all heavy equipment components and their functions.
  2. Demonstrate how to properly operate any given heavy equipment.
  3. Demonstrate how to properly service any given heavy equipment.
 
 

CT165A ELECTRICITY LEVEL I

Credits: 4

This course introduces students to core principles in electricity: electrical safety, circuits, theory, National Electrical Code; the various electricity equipment including, but not limited to, device boxes and conduits. Students will review basic electrical construction drawings, residential electrical services, and test electrical equipment. Upon completion of the course, students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the safe and proper use of electrical tools and equipment.
  2. Apply skills needed to become a certified electrician.
  3. Explain the various electrical career paths.
 
 

CT165B ELECTRICITY LEVEL II

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: CT165A  
  
This course introduces students to core principles in electricity. Students will review electrical blueprints essential for electrical wiring for commercial, industrial, and residential areas. Upon completion of this course, students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Illustrate knowledge of the National Electrical Code (NEC).
  2. Differentiate between residential, commercial, and industrial electrical blueprints.
  3. Apply the knowledge and skills related to alternating current, motors, conduit bending, conductor termination and splice, grounding and bonding, and circuit breakers and fuses.
 
 

CT165C ELECTRICITY LEVEL III

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: CT165B

This course covers the advanced principles in electricity. These principles include, but are not limited to, load calculations, conductor selection and calculations, and practical applications of lighting. Upon completion of this course students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify residential branch circuit requirements.
  2. Describe types of motor overload protection.
  3. Distinguish Class I-III hazardous locations.
  4. Interpret electrical diagrams related to the installation of distribution equipment.
 
 

CT165D ELECTRICITY LEVEL IV

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: CT165C

This is the final course in electricity. Students will learn advanced principles that include, but not limited to, specialty transformers, advanced controls, motor operations and maintenance, medium-voltage terminations/splices, and fundamentals of crew leadership. Upon completion of this course, students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational CompetencyTesting Institute (NOCTI).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Compute load calculations for residential and commercial applications.
  2. Explain the function and operation of basic electronic devices.
  3. Describe the various types of transformers.
  4. Identify the factors that affect motor reliability and lifespan.
 
 

CT172 PLUMBING INSTALLATION AND DESIGN

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: AE103

This course provides the student with the application of methods and theory in installation and design of residential and commercial plumbing systems of cold-water supply, hot water supply and drainage systems. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Determine correct elevations required in setting up wastewater lines.
  2. Properly install water pipes as detailed by given blueprints.
  3. Test all plumbing systems using a pressurized method.
 
 

CT173 ROUGH FRAMING AND EXTERIOR FINISHING

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CT153

This course concentrates on basic structure construction, which includes footing and foundation, sill, floor, wall partition, roof framing, and door and window framing. This course prepares students for the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI) certification exam.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Summarize the types of drawings prepared for commercial and residential structures.
  2. Differentiate between the types and grades of steel framing materials.
  3. Describe the components of insulation associated hardware.
 
 

CT182 UNIFORM PLUMBING CODE

Credits: 3

This course provides students with the knowledge of the Uniform Plumbing Code and applicable local code. Students will use the Uniform Plumbing Code manual as an essential resource to determine specifications for the design, construction, and installation of various plumbing systems. Upon completion of this course, students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the applicable local plumbing codes and their purpose.
  2. Explain the laws and ordinances governing plumbing systems.
  3. Determine the specifications for the design, construction and installation of various plumbing systems.
 
 

CT183 FINISHING

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: AE103 
  
This course concentrates on interior finishing of basic structure construction, which includes windows, doors, floors, and ceiling trims. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the safety hazards related to working with windows, doors, floors, and ceiling trim.
  2. Identify the different types of standard moldings and materials.
  3. Install various types of moldings.
  4. Estimate the cost of windows, doors, floors, and ceiling trims.
 
 

CT185A REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING LEVEL I

Credits: 5

This course is an introduction to air conditioning and refrigeration. Students will focus on air conditioning and refrigeration safety, blueprint reading, copper, ferrous metal, and plastic piping, soldering and brazing, basic electricity, and introduction to cooling. Upon completion of this course, students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI). 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the basic principles of heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC). Demonstrate safe and proper use of air conditioning and refrigeration tools and equipment.
  2. Illustrate how electrical power is generated and distributed.
  3. Summarize the fundamental concepts of the refrigeration cycle.
 
 

CT185B REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING LEVEL II

Credits: 5
Prerequisite: CT185A

This course is the second of three courses for air conditioning and refrigeration. Students will learn about introductory Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning (HVAC), trade mathematics, tools, air distribution systems, vents, and maintenance skills for service technicians. Upon completion of this course, students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the factors of air movement and its measurement in the air distribution systems.
  2. Explain the fundamental concepts of heating and combustion.
  3. Compute basic mathematical skills for HVAC.
  4. Demonstrate safe and proper use of air conditioning and refrigeration tools and equipment.
 
 

CT185C REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING LEVEL III

Credits: 5
Prerequisite: CT185B

This course is the last of three courses for air conditioning and refrigeration. Students will learn about compressors, alternating current, introduction to control circuit troubleshooting, metering devices, leak detection, evacuation, recovery and charging. Upon completion of this course, students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the equipment and method used to leak test refrigerant circuits.
  2. Explain how alternating current (AC) power is generated and used.
  3. Illustrate the function of refrigerant metering devices and their effect on refrigerants.
 
 

CT196A FUNDAMENTALS OF OXYACETYLENE WELDING I

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: CT100

This course is the first of two courses on oxyacetylene welding and cutting. Students will focus on the identification, use, care, safe operations, maintenance, assembling and disassembling of welding equipment and tools. Upon completion of this course, students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify commonly used welding tools, supplies, and equipment.
  2. Illustrate the setup, light, and shut down processes of oxyfuel equipment.
  3. Demonstrate safe and proper use of various tools and equipment related to oxyacetylene welding and cutting.
 
 

CT196B FUNDAMENTALS OF OXYACETYLENE WELDING II

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: CT196A

This course is the last of two courses on oxyacetylene welding and cutting. Students will learn about working with torch flame and perform in-depth cutting procedures utilizing stand-alone and portable oxyfuel cutting machines. Upon completion of this course, students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the good and inferior cuts and their causes.
  2. Illustrate the essential skills required for oxyacetylene welding.
  3. Model the proper techniques used for various oxyfuel cutting procedures.
 
 

CT197 NON-FERROUS WELDING LEVEL I

Credits: 5

This course focuses on the skills and academic competencies necessary for safe, professional, and effective practice in non-ferrous welding. This course also introduces and emphasizes basic non-ferrous welding skills, including gas metal arc welding, gas tungsten arc welding, flux cored arc welding, submerged arc welding, and plasma arc cutting. Mastery of competencies is demonstrated through completion of projects. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate skills needed to weld select non-ferrous material using oxyfuel, shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), and metal to inert gas (MIG) processes.
  2. Cut select non-ferrous materials using a plasma cutter.
  3. Identify select non-ferrous material and explain its properties.
 
 

CT197A SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING I

Credits: 5
Prerequisite: CT100

This course focuses on the skills and academic competencies necessary for safe, professional and effective practice in basic shielded metal arc welding. Emphasis will be placed on core principles in shielded metal arc welding, including use, care, safe operations and maintenance of welding tools; the use, care and safe handling of supplies and materials; the development of an appropriate attitude as related to professional work, and the acquisition of knowledge and information essential for success in initial pursuit of a career in the field of welding. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills required for basic shielded metal arc welding including selection of metals and electrodes, the making of beads, fillet welds, and groove welds.
  2. Demonstrate the professionalism and an appropriate attitude necessary in the welding field.
  3. Acquire skills needed for an entry-level position in the welding field.
 
 

CT197B SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING II

Credits: 5
Prerequisite: CT197A
 
This course builds on the content of CT197A. Students will learn Flux Core-Arc Welding (FCAW), Gas Metal-Arc Welding (GMAW) and Gas Tungsten-Arc Welding (GTAW), and submerged and plasma arc welding skills. Upon completion of this course, students will be eligible to acquire online certification through the National Occupational Competency Testing Institute (NOCTI).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe equipment used for Flux Core-Arc Welding (FCAW), Gas Metal-Arc Welding (GMAW) and Gas Tungsten-Arc Welding (GTAW).
  2. Explain the welding preparation process for Flux Core-Arc Welding (FCAW), Gas Metal-Arc Welding (GMAW) and Gas Tungsten-Arc Welding (GTAW).
  3. Illustrate welding skills for gas metal, gas tungsten, flux cored arc welding, and metal to inert gas processes.
 
 

CT292 CONSTRUCTION PRACTICUM

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Completion of all CT concentration courses

This course covers the application of field work related to the skills acquired in one of the seven concentration areas: carpentry, electricity, HVAC, masonry, plumbing, reinforcing metal worker, and welder. Students will experience a real work environment under the supervision of an industry qualified manager. Through on-the-job experience, students will gain a greater vision of what it means to be employed in the construction industry. Course offering:  As needed.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate proficiency in the operations of equipment and instruments needed for concentration area.
  2. Demonstrate professional and ethical conduct as required by specific trade.
  3. Apply employment skills in resume writing, job portfolio preparation, networking, and interviewing.
  4. Troubleshoot problems within discipline area and make appropriate corrections.

Career & Technical Education (CTE)

CTE299A PRAXIS I REVIEW PART A 

Credits: 2 
Corequisite: CTE299B Praxis I Review Part B 

This course is a direct-instruction review course that builds upon students’ reading and writing skills as needed to succeed on the Praxis I core tests in Reading (5713) and Writing (5723). Students will learn the practice of skimming, previewing, locating answers, summarizing and evaluating written materials, and producing informative and explanatory essays.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Employ critical reading and comprehension strategies.
  2. Produce informative/explanatory essays to examine and convey complex ideas and information. 
  3. Apply appropriate research skills and strategies. 
 
 

CTE299B PRAXIS I REVIEW PART B

Credits: 1
Corequisite: CTE299A Praxis I Review Part A

This course is a direct-instruction review course of the fundamentals of math including numbers and quantity, statistics and probability, data interpretation and representation, and geometry. Students will answer practice questions to apply strategies for determining what the question is asking; the approaches to math questions presenting in abstract form; and tactics for translating real world problems into algebraic equation. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Utilize geometric properties and formulas to solve problems.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to follow an arithmetic or algebraic procedure.
  3. Interpret data to solve problems. 
 
 

CTE300 FOUNDATIONS OF CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Instructor approval

This course is a study of the origins of career and technical education (CTE) in the United States, including its early leaders and philosophers, and federal legislation that has shaped CTE. A foundational course on teaching, this course introduces students to the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) – an educational framework that provides strategies to instruct, engage, manage, and challenge all learners to meet rigorous goals and remove barriers to their success. Students will engage in the in-depth study of the Danielson Framework for Teaching, describing good teaching practices. Students will also identify their own teaching beliefs and formulate a statement of their philosophy of teaching CTE. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Analyze the education philosophies of early CTE leaders. 
  2. Explain the principles of Universal Design for Learning.
  3. Apply Danielson’s Framework for Teaching in implementing excellent teaching practices. 
 
 

CTE310 CTE METHODS OF TEACHING I: PLANNING & PREPARATION

Credits: 3
Corequisite: CTE300 Foundations of CTE

Guided by the standards of Charlotte Danielson’s Framework for Teaching – planning and preparation, and the principles of Diversity Responsive Pedagogy (DRP), this course provides practical skills that will help students develop a solid foundation in writing coherent instructional plans aligned with industry standards, career-and-college-readiness, and 21st-century skills. Students will learn to select appropriate strategies and available resources to support student achievement. At the end of the course, students will design a comprehensive standards-based instructional plan applying the principles learned in the course. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the importance and benefits of a well-designed instructional plan. 
  2. Select appropriate teaching strategies and available resources to support student achievement.
  3. Write a standards-based curriculum unit that meets the needs of diverse learners.
 
 

CTE320 CLASSROOM & CTE LABORATORY MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3
Corequisite: CTE300 Foundations of CTE

Through this course, students will learn the four aspects of classroom management, (i.e. rules and procedures, disciplinary interventions, teacher-student relationship, and mental set) as well as tools and strategies that create a well-organized safe classroom and lab environment that promotes learning collaboration and achievement. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Design a classroom management plan that addresses the four aspects of classroom management.
  2. Assess the effectiveness of safety in a CTE laboratory. 
  3. Create a comprehensive CTE laboratory manual.
 
 

CTE330 EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY 

Credits: 3
Corequisite: CTE320 or Instructor approval 

This course offers a framework to guide students to apply educational technology theories and principles that transform teaching and learning. Students will evaluate instructional software and identify web-based resources to incorporate into instructional plans. The course addresses technology integration strategies and practices that are specific to various content areas. Students will have the opportunity to take the certification exam and become a Google Certified Educator Level 1 and 2. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Illustrate the usage, benefits, challenges, and limitations of educational technology.
  2. Differentiate appropriate behaviors when engaging online and with social media.
  3. Utilize technology to personalize teaching and enhance learning. 
 
 

CTE340 CTE METHODS OF TEACHING II: INSTRUCTIONAL DELIVERY 

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CTE310 CTE Methods I

This course presents effective teaching methods and contemporary classroom strategies that meet the needs of diverse students. The course incorporates the standards for effective instruction described in Charlotte Danielson’s Framework for Teaching. In this course, students will learn about culturally responsive teaching, differentiated instruction, Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP), and teaching CTE laboratory. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the four dimensions of student diversity: cultural, language, gender and exceptionalities.
  2. Select instructional strategies that support the needs of diverse learners and create a community of learners.
  3. Apply the standards of Framework for Teaching Instruction domain to assess and enhance teaching skills. 
 
 

CTE350 ASSESSMENT & GRADING 

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CTE300 Foundations of CTE

This course presents tools and techniques needed to design effective assessments that guide teaching, and accurately measure students’ mastery of 21st century skills. Students will learn about validity, reliability, meaningfulness, and appropriateness as quality assessment practices, and standards-based grading and reporting in this course. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss key quality assessment principles, incorporating them into daily classroom practices.
  2. Assess learners’ knowledge, skills, and dispositions using criterion-referenced, performance-based, and affective instruments. 
  3. Implement standards-based grading and reporting procedures. 
 
 

CTE400 CTE LEADERSHIP & PROGRAM MANAGEMENT 

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CTE300 Foundations of CTE

This course develops students’ understanding of the importance of effective CTE program design and management. Students will learn about evaluating the quality of CTE programs of study.  Work-based learning, CT Student Organizations (CTSO), articulation, dual enrollment agreements, collaboration with stakeholders, business and school community, marketing of CTE programs, retention and completion, industry credentialing and technical assessments. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) 

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Evaluate a CTE program of study using the evidence-based ACTE Quality CTE Program Framework.
  2. Use evaluative data to drive program improvement. 
  3. Develop the skills necessary to apply quality improvement practices, in management of a CTE program. 
 
 

CTE410 CTE METHODS OF TEACHING III: 21ST CENTURY TEACHING METHODOLOGY

Credits: 3 
Prerequisite: CTE310 Methods I
Corequisite: MA385 Applied Statistics

This course presents CTE educational philosophy, principles, and strategies to transform a traditional classroom into a 21st century classroom. Students will plan and execute a career and technical project-based learning curriculum that integrates 21st century skills, literacy, math, and technology. Students will also learn about strategies for managing classrooms to create students with skill and habits necessary in today’s economy, the five elements of high-quality CTE instruction, CTE’s role in literacy, math-in-CTE model, and a step-by-step approach to implementing project-based learning (PBL). 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Implement a career and technical project-based learning curriculum that integrates 21st century skills, literacy, math, and technology.
  2. Utilize quantitative and qualitative methods of assessment to obtain information about student achievement of learning outcomes.
  3. Analyze the instructional process with the use of feedback from learners, peers, and evaluators. 
 
 

CTE492 CTE STUDENT TEACHING

Credits: 12
Prerequisite: CTE350 Assessment & Grading

This is a field-based student-teaching experience which provides students with a valuable opportunity to apply pedagogical competencies in the classroom. Under the observation of the instructor-coordinator, students plan and prepare instructional materials, and direct instructional roles. Students assess learning outcomes, assist in record-keeping, and perform other responsibilities of a classroom teacher. Students submit field and conference reports based upon teaching assignment. The Framework for Teaching standards will be used to evaluate student performance. Students should be prepared to accept an assignment at any school or a CTE subject designated by the instructor-coordinator. This course requires 540 contact hours which is comprised of 525 student teaching hours and 15 instructional hours. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply the principles of sound CTE pedagogical practices, strategies, and concepts in the classroom.
  2. Implement valid and reliable assessments to guide professional development. 
  3. Conduct a summative reflection on the efficacy of teaching practices, strategies, and concepts used in the classroom. 
 
 

CTE498 PRAXIS III PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING & TEACHING

Credits: 2

This course is a direct-instruction review course that builds upon students’ academic skills and subject-specific content knowledge needed for teaching. The purpose of Praxis Principles of Learning and Teaching is to assess students’ knowledge and understanding of the foundations of educational practices and concepts. The CTE498Praxis cCourse is designed to prepare students for the Praxis Principles of Learning and Teaching Grades 7 – 12 exam. 

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Compare and contrast the ways various educational theories are applied to teaching practice.
  2. Discuss how curriculum goals and discipline-specific scope and sequence framework are translated into unit and lesson plans. 
  3. Explain the characteristics, uses, advantages, and limitations of formal and informal types of assessments. 
 
 

CTE499 CTE CAPSTONE

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CTE410 CTE Methods III

This interdisciplinary course is designed to develop students’ skills in implementing research-based methods of teaching that will improve classroom practice. Students will utilize a framework to conduct classroom action research. To apply these skills students will create a portfolio showcasing program knowledge, occupational skills, and a plan for continued professional growth.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the importance of conducting classroom action research.
  2. Present a completed classroom action research project. 
  3. Showcase program learning outcomes in a portfolio. 

Culinary Arts (CUL)

CUL140 CULINARY FOUNDATION I

Credits: 2
Prerequisite: FSM120

This course introduces students to culinary terminology, concepts and principles, and includes the basic preparation of stock, soups, and sauces and cooking techniques such as dry heat cooking techniques of roasting, grilling, and frying; moist heat cooking techniques of boiling, steaming, poaching; and combination cooking techniques of braising and stewing. Key components of the course include application of food safety principles introduced in Food Safety and Sanitation course and the practice of standards of professionalism learned in Introduction to the Foodservice Profession. The concept of mise-en-place, kitchen organization, sustainability, safe use and care of chef tools and commercial equipment will be introduced in this course. Students will also learn about taste, flavor, cooking, and plating principles. At the end of the course, students will have a working vocabulary of culinary terms and the ability to select and prepare ingredients using the right tool, equipment, and cooking principles to produce quality prepared dishes. Formerly titled Culinary Foundations I.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify equipment and tools used in a professional kitchen.
  2. List sustainable practices in the kitchen.
  3. Demonstrate knife skills and cooking techniques as applied to a given range of foods and recipes.
  4. Apply kitchen and food safety principles during food production.
  5. Conduct sensory analysis of finished products.
 
 

CUL160 CULINARY FOUNDATION II

Credits: 2
Prerequisite: CUL140

This course builds on the foundational skills presented in Culinary Foundation I. Applying the principles learned in CUL140, students will prepare stocks, grand and contemporary sauces, soups, vegetables, potatoes, grains, pasta, meat, poultry, fish and seafood using classic European and Mediterranean cooking techniques. Time management and organization are reinforced. Students will further study and practice dry heat, moist heat, and combination cooking techniques and prepare dishes with complimenting classical and contemporary sauces. Students will learn to fabricate meat, poultry, fish, and shellfish and prepare common mise-en-place incorporating classical knife cuts. Use and care of commercial equipment, tools, and facility, understanding of measurement and ratios and adherence to recipes and sustainable kitchen practices are embedded in this hands-on course. Following the attributes of a professional culinarian, students will demonstrate professionalism, respect of the culinary craft, and strict adherence to kitchen safety and sanitation procedures. Formerly titled Culinary Foundations II.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate classic knife cuts.
  2. Prepare meat, poultry, fish, or shellfish using appropriate European or Mediterranean cooking techniques.
  3. Apply kitchen and food safety principles during food production.
  4. Prepare grains, vegetables, potatoes, or pasta using appropriate European or Mediterranean cooking techniques.
  5. Prepare the five French mother sauces and the three contemporary sauces (reduction, puree, and emulsion).
 
 

CUL180 GARDE MANGER

Credits: 2
Prerequisite: CUL160

This course introduces the students to the art and craft of garde manger, which includes the preparation of hot and cold hors d’ouvres, canapes, and appetizers. Applying the concept of “total utilization,” students will learn the techniques of
forcemeat production, charcuterie, and food preservation. Emphasis will be placed on culinary principles, techniques, food safety, use and care of equipment, and standards of quality for cold and buffet presentations. Following the attributes of a professional culinarian, students will demonstrate professionalism, respect for culinary craft, and strict adherence to kitchen sanitation and procedures.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate basic preparation of forcemeats such as pates, galantines, terrines, and sausages using culinary principles and quality standards.
  2. Prepare various sandwiches, canapes, hors d’ouvres, and appetizers using culinary principles and quality standards.
  3. Prepare composed salad, dressing, and marinades using culinary principles and quality standards. Reinforce the principles of food safety and sustainable food production.
  4. Demonstrate food presentation techniques using a variety of plates, platters, and trays.
 
 

CUL200 FOUNDATIONS OF BAKING AND PASTRY 

Credits: 2
Prerequisite: CUL160

This course introduces students to basic principles, skills, and techniques of baking and pastry. Special emphasis is placed on ingredient identification and function, weights and measures, safe use and care of baking tools and equipment and evaluation of quality characteristics. Students will apply basic baking principles and techniques in the production of yeast breads, cookies and pies, and pastry and laminated doughs, breakfast and individual pastries, custards, creams, mousses, and souffles, icing, glazes, and sauces, and frozen dessert. Formerly titled Basic Baking I: Breads and Baking.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe properties and functions of major baking ingredients.
  2. Demonstrate proper scaling and measuring techniques.
  3. Choose the appropriate technique and equipment for baking each product.
  4. Apply math skills to recipe conversion.
  5. Evaluate characteristics of quality of baked goods.
 
 

CUL220 INTERMEDIATE BAKING AND PASTRY

Credits: 2

This course builds on the principles and techniques introduced in CUL200 Foundations of Baking and Pastry.  Students are introduced to individually plate desserts using traditional and modern techniques including methods to develop desserts that are healthy or conform to dietary restrictions. Students will have the opportunity to gain practical experience in the production, assembly, and decoration of special occasion cakes.   

Student Leaning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Create plated desserts that are attractive and appropriate for a variety of foodservice venues.   
  2. Create healthy desserts that conform to specific dietary restrictions.
  3. Assemble and decorate cakes that meet quality standards.
 
 

CUL240 PACIFIC ASIAN CUISINE

Credits: 2
Prerequisite: CUL160
Corequisite: CUL180

Students study, prepare, serve, and evaluate traditional cuisines of Pacific and Asian countries. Emphasis will be placed on ingredients, flavor profiles, cooking methods, and techniques. Through regularly-scheduled Asian-theme buffet showcase, students gain practical experience in menu and event planning, marketing, time and labor management. Formerly titled Pacific and Asian Cuisine.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the influence of geography, climate, history, and philosophy in each of the cuisine. 
  2. Reinforce the principles of food safety and sustainable food production. 
  3. Demonstrate the fundamentals of Asian or Pacific cooking principles and preparation techniques. 
  4. Plan, organize, and implement buffet presentations. 
  5. Evaluate visual appearance, flavor, taste, and texture of prepared food. 
 
 

CUL293A CULINARY PRACTICUM PART I

Credits: 2
Prerequisite: CUL160

This is a faculty-supervised practicum designed to expand career knowledge, hone culinary skills with increasing speed, timing, and organization in an approved commercial foodservice establishment.  
To ensure that students benefit from a well-rounded practicum experience, they will rotate in different areas of 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify components of workplace culture, norms, and expectations.
  2. Apply effective time management, teamwork, and communication skills needed to work in a professional kitchen. 
  3. Apply standards and procedures for safe food handling. 
 
 

CUL293B CULINARY PRACTICUM PART II

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CUL293A

This course is a continuation of Culinary Practicum Part I, where students will choose an area to specialize in, to include hot kitchen, cold kitchen and bakery/pastry/dessert section. The intent of each area of specialization is to further students’ culinary skills and abilities with regard to speed, timing, and organization.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply skills in food production related to area of specialization.
  2. Demonstrate effective time management and teamwork in a professional kitchen. 
  3. Utilize feedback received from industry professionals. 
 
 

CUL299 CULINARY CAPSTONE

Credits: 2
Prerequisite: CUL240

Based on contemporary North American cuisines, this course builds on the techniques and principles introduced and reinforced in the program. Skills in classical knife cuts, product identification, fabrication of meat, poultry, fish, and shellfish, preparation and cooking of a variety of meat, seafood, vegetables, potatoes, and pasta, plating techniques are refined and improved. Students will identify and define ingredients, flavor profile, and apply appropriate cooking technique to produce quality a la minute plates. Use and care of commercial equipment, tools, and facility, mise-en-place, understanding of measurement and ratio, and adherence to recipes and sustainable kitchen practices are emphasized. Following the attributes of a professional culinarian, students are expected to demonstrate professionalism, respect of the culinary craft, and strict adherence to kitchen sanitation procedures. At the end of the course, students will write standardized recipes for a 3-course plated menu, execute, and serve to industry professionals for judging. Formerly CUL280.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a thorough working knowledge of safety and sanitation skills. 
  2. Evaluate organization skills, organization, work flow, and proper utilization of all ingredients. 
  3. Demonstrate craftsmanship skills through creativity, classical knife cuts, and proper cooking techniques, utilizing correct methods of preparation, serving, and portion size. 
  4. Demonstrate finished product skill, serving methods and presentation, portion size and nutritional balance, ingredient compatibility, flavor, taste, texture, and doneness.

EC110 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS

Credits: 3    
Prerequisite: Placement into EN110 or equivalent

This course is designed to help students understand the economic challenges and opportunities found in the United States mainland and Guam. This introductory course focuses on describing economic events, explaining why they occur, predicting similar future events, and recommending solutions. Financial responsibilities always impact people’s lives and their dependents. Understanding the relationship between financial decisions and outcomes is extremely important for all citizens.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss with understanding the basic principles and theories of economics.
  2. Apply economic principles and theories to decisions societies make (Micro).
  3. Demonstrate understanding of the relationships between various global markets and the impact those relationships have on the entire world economy (Macro).

ED150 INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING

Credits: 3

This course presents a unique and realistic approach to the fundamentals of teaching as a career. Not only are the rewards of teaching established and explored, but also the challenges educators face in the classroom. The course also introduces students to the larger topics of education, including discipline, history, philosophy, learning theories, teaching techniques, assessment, classroom management and diversity. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Develop a philosophy of education that includes self-efficacy.  
  2. Formulate a comprehensive academic plan to include goals and objectives related to a profession in education.  
  3. Demonstrate diverse teaching strategies and integration of curricula standards on a chosen subject area.
 
 

ED180 EDUCATIONAL METHODS

Credits: 3
Prerequisite:  None

This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to plan, prepare and implement educational activities and teaching strategies in a K-12th grade educational setting. The course is designed for individuals interested in pursuing a career in an educational setting. Course content focuses on identifying the diversity of learners’ needs, instructional approaches to best address this diversity, planning and implementing activities, and project based learning. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Present at least three effective educational methods and/or strategies for primary, middle, and secondary programs. 
  2. Develop a written plan for an interdisciplinary project which aligns with Common Core and local standards. 
  3. Design a learning center based on Bloom’s Levels of Taxonomy which addresses at least three learning styles.
 
 

ED220 HUMAN GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT

Credits: 3

This course covers the study of human growth and development from birth to death with a special emphasis on the formative and school years. An overview of the interrelationship between physical, emotional, intellectual, and social growth will be presented. The role of the family, culture, community and society and the impact on development is also explored.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the social, physical, and cognitive development of school-age learners.
  2. Explain the social, physical, and cognitive development of adolescent and young adult learners.
  3. Illustrate the impact of family, culture, community and society on development.
 
 

ED231 INTRODUCTION TO EXCEPTIONALITIES 

Credits: 3

This course provides students with an introduction to exceptionalities. An overview of all aspects of exceptionality including etiology, legal aspects, assessment, and service delivery will be provided. Formerly: Introduction to Exceptional Children.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe ways to meet the needs of students with exceptionalities.
  2. Develop strategies to communicate with and empower families of students with exceptionalities. 
  3. Explain the process of referral, screening, and assessment, including knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of primary members.
 
 

ED265 CULTURE AND EDUCATION ON GUAM

Credits: 3

This course focuses on aspects of Guam’s cultural development to include cultural reciprocity, cultural exchanges, and tensions. How these factors impacted Guam’s educational system will also be covered. The historical, current, and future impact of these topics on educators and educational methods will also be addressed. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Analyze the effect of current and past issues pertaining to Guam’s cultural development and education system.
  2. Project future problems that may affect Guam’s community and educational system to include diversity issues.
  3. Engage in social and/or political action directed at improving education on Guam.
 
 

ED292 EDUCATION PRACTICUM

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Department Chair approval

This course provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate professionalism, employing reflective practices while working and/or volunteering 135 hours in a K-12 school setting under the supervision of a mentor. Students will be required to assist their mentor as needed which may include conducting observations, attending meetings, creating a conducive environment, grading, and implementing age-appropriate lessons and activities. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate appropriate professional behavior. 
  2. Effectively and respectfully communicate with students, staff and families including those from diverse backgrounds and special populations.  
  3. Implement various developmentallyappropriate teaching, assessment and guidance strategies needed to effectively work with students in Kindergarten to twelfth grade.
 
 

ED300 PRINCIPLES OF ADULT TEACHING AND LEARNING

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: ED220

Designed for educators of adults, this course equips practitioners with the knowledge about adult learners and the principles and process of adult teaching.  Students will learn the context of adult learning, theories, and models and approaches to adult learning.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Differentiate adult learning from the education of children.
  2. Internalize a philosophy of teaching that reflects the values and principles of adult teaching and learning through written reflection. 
  3. Facilitate a workshop or an educational session for adult learners as a demonstration of learning.

Electronics (EE)

EE103 DIRECT CURRENT CIRCUITS

Credits: 4

 This beginning course in electricity provides a thorough, comprehensive, and practical coverage of direct current circuit's concept and application. It covers electrical safety, scientific notation, electricity, resistors, ohm's law, series circuits, parallel circuits, series-parallel circuits, conductors and insulators, analog and digital multi-meter, batteries, magnetism, and electromagnetic induction.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Follow national, state, and local industry established electrical safety.
  2. Explain and illustrate the elements and properties of electrical circuits.
  3. Design, analyze, and calculate electrical quantities of series, parallel, and series-parallel circuits.
 
 

EE104 ALTERNATING CURRENT CIRCUITS

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: EE103

 This second course in electricity provides a thorough, comprehensive, and practical coverage of alternating current circuit's concept and application. It includes basic of trigonometry, alternating current and voltage, capacitance, capacitive reactance, capacitive circuits, inductance, inductive reactance, inductive circuits, RC and RL time constant, alternating current circuits, resonance, and filters.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Follow national, state, and local industry established electrical safety procedures.
  2. Illustrate and describe AC voltage and the characteristics of AC voltage source.
  3. Design, experiment, and troubleshoot alternating current circuits.
 
 

EE107 INTRODUCTION TO INSTRUMENTATION

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: EE112

This is an introductory course in instrumentation that covers typical metered electronic measuring devices used in a wide range of technical and scientific fields. The student will receive a thorough grounding in meter theory, design, and application. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate and explain the purpose and use of voltmeters, ammeters, and ohmmeters in measuring voltages, currents and resistances.
  2. Illustrate and calculate the meter shunt, resistance multiplier, and the current limiting resistances of a voltmeter, ammeter and ohmmeter.
  3. Explain and illustrate the advantages of digital meters over an analog type of meter.
  4. List four integrating techniques as applied to digital meters and explain the operation of each.
  5. Identify the various oscilloscope controls and illustrate how they are being used to measure average value, RMS or effective value, peak value, peak to peak value, frequency, period, pulse time, pulse repetition frequency, and phase shift of an AC circuit.
 
 

EE112 ELECTRONIC DEVICES

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: EE104

This is a preparatory course covering the fundamentals of semiconductor devices as applied to electronic circuits. Through lecture and lab work, students will become familiar with basic and advanced semiconductor devices and electronic circuits with an emphasis on electronic troubleshooting.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Design a power supply circuit.
  2. Identify each part of a power supply system.
  3. Calculate the voltage gain for a transistor amplifier circuit.
 
 

EE116 DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: EE104 and EE112

This course provides an introduction to digital techniques, semiconductor devices for digital integrated circuits, Boolean Algebra, flip-flop registers, sequential logic circuits, counters, clocks, shift registers, combination logic circuits, digital design and applications.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Design a simple counter circuit.
  2. Simplify logic circuits using k-map.
  3. Identify different types of logic circuits.
 
 

EE130 PROJECT MANAGEMENT FOR IT

Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide basic project management skills with a strong emphasis on issues and problems associated with delivering successful IT projects. The module is designed to provide an understanding of the particular issues encountered in handling IT projects and to offer students methods, techniques and 'hands-on' experience in dealing with them.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the fundamentals of project management.
  2. Demonstrate effective project execution and control.
  3. Implement general business concepts, practices, and tools to facilitate project success.
 
 

EE131 SERVER TECHNOLOGY

Credits: 3

This course builds on student’s existing mid- to upper-level knowledge and experience with personal computer operating systems and networks. Students will learn to utilize advanced skills and concepts necessary for management of server technology. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe different types of servers, identifying their hardware and software components.
  2. Explain disaster-recovery concepts and techniques.
  3. Configure servers for optimal performance.
 
 

EE211 IT ESSENTIALS I

Credits: 4

IT Essentials 1 (ITE) emphasizes practical knowledge and experience to help students develop fundamental computer and career skills.  ITE helps students prepare for entry-level career opportunities in IT and for the CompTIA A+ certification exam.  The course also provides a learning pathway to Cisco CCNA Routing and Switching, Linux Essentials, and Introduction to the Internet of Everything (IoE). 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the internal components of a computer.
  2. Assemble a computer system meeting all required standards.
  3. Install and understand operating systems on computers and mobile devices.
 
 

EE215 IT ESSENTIALS II

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: EE211

IT Essentials II helps students prepare for the CompTIA A+ Practical Application exam, which builds on the CompTIA A+ Essentials knowledge and skills, with more of a hands-on orientation and scenarios in which troubleshooting and tools must be applied to resolve problems.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Upgrade laptop components based on customer needs.
  2. Perform preventive maintenance and troubleshooting on components of a printer/scanner.
  3. Install a network; upgrade components based on customer needs and perform preventive maintenance and advanced trouble shooting. 
 
 

EE242 PRINCIPLES OF VOICE AND DATA CABLING 

Credits: 2

This course provides an overview of cabling and networking industry standards as well as emerging cabling technologies. It is designed for students interested in the physical aspects of voice and data network cabling and installation.  Students will learn about documentation, design, installation, laboratory safety, as well as working effectively in group environments. Students will become familiar with cabling issues related to data and voice connectivity, media and transmission practices, and cabling customer support. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Define standards and codes pertaining to the IT field. 
  2. Terminate and test category cabling systems.
  3. Terminate and test coaxial cabling systems. Design basic network infrastructure systems.
 
 

EE243 FIBER OPTICS INSTALLATION

Credits: 3

This course is designed for personnel who work with fiber optic cables or individuals who want a working knowledge of fiber optics. Students in this course will learn how to splice, terminate, and test fiber optics cables/systems.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Install, terminate, and splice fiber optic cables.  
  2. Troubleshoot and repair fiber optic cables. 
  3. Use test equipment for troubleshooting (light source & power meter, optical time domain, reflectometer, & visible light source).
 
 

EE265 COMPUTER NETWORKING I

Credits: 5

The first course in the CCNA curriculum introduces the architecture, models, protocols, and networking elements that connect users, devices, applications and data through the Internet and across modern computer networks - including IP addressing and Ethernet fundamentals. By the end of the course, students will be able to build simple Llocal Aarea Nnetworks (LAN) that integrate IP addressing schemes, foundational network security, and perform basic configurations for routers and switches.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Build a simple Local Area Network (LAN). 
  2. Perform basic configurations for routers and switches. 
  3. Implement IPv4 and IPv6 addressing schemes. 
 
 

EE266 COMPUTER NETWORKING II

Credits: 5
Prerequisite: EE265

The second course in the CCNA curriculum focuses on switching technologies and router operations that support small-to-medium business networks and includes Wwireless Llocal Aarea Nnetworks (WLAN) and security concepts. Students learn key switching and routing concepts. Perform basic network configuration and troubleshooting, identify and mitigate LAN security threats, and configure and secure a basic WLAN. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Configure switch security to mitigate LAN attacks. 
  2. Configure IPv4 and IPv6 floating static routes.
  3. Implement VLANs and trunking in a switched network. 
 
 

EE267 COMPUTER NETWORKING III

Credits: 5
Prerequisite: EE266

The third course in the CCNA curriculum describes the architectures and considerations related to designing, securing, operating, and troubleshooting enterprise networks. This course covers Wwide Aarea Nnetwork (WAN) technologies and quality of service (QoS) mechanisms used for secure remote access along with the introduction of software-defined networking, virtualization, and automation concepts that support the digitalization of networks. Students gain skills to configure and troubleshoot enterprise networks, and learn to identify and protect against cybersecurity threats. They are introduced to network management tools and learn key concepts of software-defined networking, including controller-based architectures and how application programming interfaces (APIs) enable network automation.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Utilize single-area OSPFv2 in both point-to-point and broadcast multiaccess networks. 
  2. Implement IPv4 ACLs to filter traffic and secure administrative access. 
  3. Perform network management protocols to monitor the network. 
 
 

EE268 COMPUTER NETWORKING IV

Credits: 5
Prerequisite: EE267

Computer Networking IV focuses on WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. The course enables students to apply the selection criteria for network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Write Aaccess Ccontrol Llists (ACLs) to filter traffic.
  2. Implement remote access and site-to-site Virtual Private Networks (VPNs).
  3. Configure router to router for WAN.
 
 

EE271 ADVANCED COMPUTER NETWORKING I

Credits: 5
Prerequisite: EE268

This course is the first course in the Cisco Certified Networking Professional (CCNP) curriculum. This course will cover the configuration of Cisco routers for operation in large or growing multiprotocol Internet works. This course includes lectures and labs that focus primarily on scalable technologies and the Cisco IOS software features that are most useful in building large or growing Internet works. These features include scalable routing protocols such as Open Shortest Path First (OSPF), Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP), Intermediate System to Intermediate System (IS-IS), Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), Variable Length Subnet Mask (VLSM), Classless Inter Domain Routing (CIDR), route redistribution, and route summarization.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify scalable technologies for growing internet works.
  2. Configure CISCO routers for operations.
  3. Implement the EIGRP, IPv6, and OSPF in an enterprise network.
 
 

EE275 ADVANCED COMPUTER NETWORKING III

Credits: 5
Prerequisite: EE271

This course introduces students on the deployment of the state-of the-art campus LANs. The course focuses on the selection and implementation of the appropriate Cisco IOS services to build reliable scalable multilayer switched LANs. Students will develop skills with VLANs, VTP, STP, inter-VLAN routing, multilayer switching, redundancy, Cisco AVVID solutions, QoS issues, campus LAN security, and emerging transparent LAN services. This hands-on, lab oriented course stresses the design, implementation, operation, and troubleshooting of switched and routed environments. This course may lead to a Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) designation.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Design state-of-the-art campus LANs.
  2. Connect networks utilizing various protocols.
  3. Troubleshoot switched and routed environments.
 
 

EE283 NETWORK SECURITY

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: CS101

This course equips Information Technology (IT) professionals with a foundational knowledge of security topics. Upon successful completion, will assist students in preparing for the CompTIA Security+ exam.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify fundamental concepts of computer security.
  2. Resolve security threats.
  3. Apply secure network administration principles.
 
 

EE284 CCNA SECURITY

Credits: 5

The CCNA Security equips students with the knowledge and skills needed to prepare for entry-level security specialist careers. This course is a hands-on, career-oriented e-learning solution that emphasizes practical experience. CCNA Security aims to develop an in-depth understanding of network security principles as well as the tools and configurations required to secure a network.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the basics of securing a network.
  2. Apply firewall technologies to secure the network perimeter.
  3. Implement Adaptive Security Appliances (ASA) firewall configuration using the CLI.

Electro Mechanical (EM)

EM112 NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE

Credits: 3    

This course provides knowledge and understanding of the National Electrical Code governing the installation of residential and commercial electrical systems.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Correctly reference information using the National Electric Code in various electrical appliances.
  2. Identify faulty installations based on the National Electric Code.
  3. Select the proper codes to apply to residential or commercial applications.

Emergency Medical Service (EMS)

EMS103 EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN (EMT) - BASIC

Credits: 8
Prerequisite: HL121, EN110 or equivalent,

This course is designed for ambulance service members and others who need to be trained to the level of EMT. Students will learn how to provide emergency care to victims of accidents and illness, recognize the nature and seriousness of the patient's condition, assess the patient's requirements for emergency care, and administer appropriate pre-hospital care to stabilize the patient's condition. Upon completion of this course students will be eligible to test for the National Registry of EMT (NREMT), national certifying examination. *Minimum age 18 years old. Police, Court & Drug clearance will be needed 30 days prior to clinicals. Physical Exam no older than 6 months prior to clinicals. Driver’s License.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe all types of emergencies.
  2. Demonstrate skills needed to provide emergency care to victims.
  3. Determine the extent of a patient’s condition and assess requirements for care.
 
 

EMS109 EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN - REFRESHER

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: EMS103

This course is a refresher for qualified EMTs who must update their training and must re-certify every two (2) years. The course involves review and updating of the materials presented in EMS103.  Formerly CJ109.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain various types of emergencies.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge and skills needed to care for victims in emergencies.
  3. Demonstrate most current practices of Emergency Medical Technicians.
 
 

EMS170 EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN - INTERMEDIATE I

Credits: 7
Prerequisite: Valid EMT-Basic Certification from Guam or the NREMT.

This course is the first of two modules of EMT-Intermediate for EMT’s who wish to increase their knowledge and deliver a more sophisticated level of emergency medical care in the Advanced Life Support (ALS) area. The course is designed for ambulance service members and others who wish to be trained in this advance level of EMT. Can be repeated for credit.  Formerly CJ170.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the roles and responsibilities of an Intermediate Emergency Medical Technician.
  2. Deliver an advanced level of emergency care in the ALS area.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge and skills needed of an EMT at an intermediate level.
 
 

EMS175 EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN INTERMEDIATE II

Credits: 7
Prerequisite:  18-Years-old

This course is the second of two modules of EMT Intermediate for EMTs who wish to increase their knowledge and deliver a more sophisticated level of emergency medical care in the Advanced Life Support (ALS) area. The course is designed for ambulance service members and others who wish to be trained to this advance level of EMT.  Formerly CJ175.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain various types of emergencies and care needed at an advanced level.
  2. Deliver an advanced level of emergency care in the ALS area.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge and skills needed of an EMT at an advanced level.
 
 

EMS176 EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN - INTERMEDIATE REVIEW

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Valid EMT-Intermediate certification from either Guam or the NREMT, EMS175

This course is designed to maintain EMT-Intermediate’s proficiency and certification. Students will review essential components of the National Standard Curriculum for EMT Intermediates and will also be presented with additional EMT-Intermediate knowledge and skills pertaining specifically to Guam’s EMS system.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the National Standard Curriculum for EMT Intermediates.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge and skills needed for the local EMS system.
  3. Acquire nationally recognized EMT certification.

EN068 LANGUAGE ARTS LITERACY

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Placement via CASAS assessment (236)

This course is designed to develop and improve the students’ current reading skill level as determined by the Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS) and writing skills. The course incorporates the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS) for adult education; the standards will enhance students’ reading and writing skills which will prepare them for postsecondary education and the workforce. Relevant individualized instruction provides reading and writing activities to enable students to become empowered, competent, critical, and reflective in their reading and writing. At the end of each semester, students enrolled in this course are required to complete the posttest component of CASAS; students scoring a 245 or above in the CASAS reading assessment will be considered to have achieved the Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) for the course and can be awarded a grade for the course.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and make logical inferences. 
  2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
  3. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
  4. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
  6. Use technology, including the internet, to produce and publish and to interact and collaborate with others.
 
 

EN081 LITERATURE SURVEY

Credits: 3
This course is an application of English Language

Arts standards called for in the College and Career Readiness Standards for Adult Education. This course provides adult students with an opportunity to read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems. Areas of instruction include the structure of and literary elements contained in these genrethis genre, reading comprehension, vocabulary development, and literature-based composition.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Determine a theme or central idea of a text. (RL.9-10.2, L.9-10.1, L11-12.6)
  2. Conduct literary analysis (short story, poetry, etc.).  (RI.11-12.3)
  3. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information. (W.9-10.2b-c, W.11-12.9a)
  4. Develop writing by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. (W.910.2a-f , W.11-12.5, W.11-12.9a, L.9-10.1-3, L.11-12.4a-d)
 
 

EN091 FUNDAMENTALS OF COMMUNICATION

Credits: 3

This course is a study of communication and speech; it introduces students to the evolving process of communication. Basic channels of communication, principles of interpersonal communication, group communication, and the preparation and delivery of speech presentation are aspects that will be covered. This course incorporates the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS) for Adult Education. Relevant individualized instruction provides reading, writing, listening, and speaking activities to enable students to become empowered, competent, critical, and reflective in their communication.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
  2. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  3. Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.
  4. Acquire and use accurately a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for speaking and listening at the college and career readiness level.
  5. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
 
 

EN096 BASIC ENGLISH LEVEL I

Credits: 6

This course provides reading and writing instruction for students who require extensive preparation to succeed in college-level English courses or in certification into the workforce. Upon successful completion, students will progress to EN097, Basic English Level II.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate understanding of the procedure of brainstorm, organize, draft, revise, edit, and proofread academic writing. 
  2. Apply critical thinking and reading comprehension techniques to analyze literal, interpretive, and applied college-level and other texts.  
  3. Utilize technology to communicate, problem-solve, and research for information in the academic setting.  
 
 

EN097 BASIC ENGLISH LEVEL II

Credits: 3  
 
Prerequisite: Pass EN096 or reading score of 52-74 in the ACCUPLACER placement test. Basic English Level II provides reading and writing instruction for students who require intermediate preparation to succeed in college-level English courses or in certification into the workforce where applicable.  
  
Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the process of brainstorming, organizing, drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading academic writing.
  2. Apply critical thinking skills when exploring college-level reading materials and composing academic writing. 
  3. Create well-developed, coherent, and unified college-level essays. 
 
 

EN110 FRESHMAN COMPOSITION

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Placement into EN110 or equivalent

Emphasizing critical reading, writing, and thinking, this course focuses on communicating clearly and effectively using standard written English in an academic setting, as well as in other communities. Students will practice exploring ideas, conveying information, and developing their writing process. They will demonstrate logical reasoning, clarity, organization, and appropriate language choices in their writing.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Employ the writing process (prewriting, organizing, drafting, revising, editing) and writing strategies. 
  2. Examine the connection between reading and writing. 
  3. Compose effective and strategic essays. 
 
 

EN110A FRESHMAN COMPOSITION WITH INSTRUCTIONAL LAB

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: Placement 

Emphasizing critical reading, writing, and thinking skills, this course focuses on communicating clearly and effectively using standard written English in an academic setting, as well as in other communities.  Students will practice exploring ideas, conveying information, and developing their writing process.  They will demonstrate logical reasoning, clarity, organization, and appropriate language choices in their writing.  The instructional lab component will provide grammatical and mechanical lessons and reinforce skills necessary for students to achieve the SLOs for successful completion of EN 110A. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Employ the writing process (prewriting, organizing, drafting, revising, editing) and writing strategies. 
  2. Examine the connection between reading and writing. 
  3. Compose effective and strategic essays. 
  4. Utilize proper grammar and writing conventions to construct various sentence types to create sense, clarity, and stress in college-level writing.
 
 

EN111 WRITING FOR RESEARCH

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: EN110

This course builds on the content covered in EN110.  Emphasis is placed on academic research processes and writing.  Students will develop information literacy skills to access both primary and secondary sources. Students will also engage in critical analyses of print, electronic, and observational data.   

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Evaluate the credibility of primary and secondary sources. 
  2. Compose essays that summarize, paraphrase, quote, and synthesize information gathered from research. 
  3. Apply appropriate documentation style. 
  4. Develop an argumentative essay supported by research. 
 
 

EN194 TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

Credits: 3
Course Offering: Spring
Prerequisite: EN110 “C” or better.

This course prepares students to communicate effectively for business, industry, and professions.  Students will engage in the writing process and develop examples of technical communication as well as deliver professional, and oral presentations.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Define technical communication and its major traits.
  2. Create audience profiles and employ the technical communication writing process to produce correctly written and formatted technical communication.
  3. Create various types of properly formatted technical communication.
  4. Deliver professional, oral presentations for technical communication purposes.
 
 

EN210 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE

Credits: 3
Course Offering: Fall & Spring
Prerequisite: EN110 “C” or better.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the major division of literature: fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will develop an understanding of and appreciation for literary elements. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Recognize the differences between literary genres, including but not limited to poetry, fiction, and drama.  
  2. Demonstrate basic familiarity and comprehension of vocabulary for discussing literary texts.
  3. Write analytically about literature.
 
 

EN300 WRITING FOR EDUCATORS

Credits: 3
Corequisite: CTE499

This course provides techniques and strategies for using writing to support learning across the curriculum. By discussing current research and best practices, creating discipline-specific writing assignments, and through the development of their own writing, students will further develop their skills for teaching literacy in content areas in a 21st century CTE classroom. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) 

  1. Select reading strategies appropriate to the literacy requirements oif their content areas and age of students.
  2. Explore trends and current research and theories in the teaching of Language Arts and literacy.
  3. Create and assess writing assignments that support content areas. 

Family Services (FA)

FA192 FAMILY SERVICES PRACTICUM

Credits: 3    
Prerequisite: Department Chair approval

Students will have the opportunity to implement their knowledge and skills while working under the mentorship of a qualified social services professional and faculty member. A minimum of 135 hours of work is required, which may include observations, meetings with clients and professionals, and professional development activities.  

Student learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate effective communication skills with clients and co-workers.
  2. Demonstrate appropriate competency needed in the effective delivery of human services.
  3. Demonstrate professionalism and ethical conduct within the field.

Fire Science Technology (FS)

FS100 INTRODUCTION TO FIRE PROTECTION

Credits: 3
Course Offering: Fire Academy
Prerequisite: Instructor approval

This course covers the philosophy and history of fire protection; history of loss of life and property by fire; review of municipal fire defenses; study of the organization and function of federal and state, county and private fire protection agencies, survey of professional fire protection career opportunities. This course is designed for career public safety officers and recruits.  Course offering:  Fire Academy only. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify career opportunities in the fire science field.
  2. Research and examine local, state and federal fire protection agencies.
  3. Discuss the philosophy and history of fire protection.
 
 

FS101 INTRODUCTION TO FIRE SUPPRESSION

Credits: 3
Course Offering: Fire Academy
Prerequisite: Instructor approval

This course is a study of techniques of effective fire prevention to include fire hazards and causes; judging fire load, building construction, inspection techniques; and storage of flammable and combustible liquids and hazardous materials security. This course is designed for career public safety officers and recruits 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain strategies for effective fire protection.
  2. Identify inspection techniques used in fire protection careers.
  3. Identify various types of building structures and explain the importance of basic fire resistance requirements.
 
 

FS102 FIRE SERVICE ON GUAM

Credits: 3
Course Offering: Fire Academy
Prerequisite: Instructor approval

A study of the topographical layout of Guam and the techniques and methods used in grassland firefighting will be explored. This course is designed for career public safety officers and recruits.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Recognize and identify key features of the topographical layout of Guam.
  2. Integrate knowledge of the topographical layout of Guam to gain maximum advantage when firefighting.
  3. Properly apply the techniques and methods used for grassland firefighting.
 
 

FS103 FIRE FIGHTER I

Credits: 8
Course Offering: Fire Academy
Prerequisite: Instructor approval

This course is based on National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1001, Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications.  This course is designed for the person who seeks the knowledge and skills to function as an integral member of a firefighting team under direct or general supervision in hazardous conditions.  Enrollment is limited to students currently in the Fire Science Academy. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills to perform basic firefighting emergency and rescue operations and duties.
  2. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills to operate basic firefighting rescue tools and equipment.
  3. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills to pass the National Professional Qualifications System (NPQS) certification test for Firefighter I level.
 
 

FS104 FIRE FIGHTER II

Credits: 3
Course Offering: Fire Academy
Prerequisite: Instructor approval

This course is based on the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1001, Standard for Fire Fighter Professional Qualifications.  The course is designed for the person who seeks the knowledge and skills to function as an integral member of a firefighting team under direct or general supervision in hazardous conditions.  Enrollment is limited to students currently in the Fire Academy.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills to perform basic firefighting emergency and rescue operations and duties.
  2. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills to operate basic firefighting rescue tools and equipment.
  3. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills to pass the National Professional Qualifications System (NPQS) certification test for Firefighter II level.
 
 

FS105 FIRE PREVENTION

Credits: 3
Course Offering: Fire Academy
Prerequisite: Instructor approval

A study of techniques of effective fire prevention to include fire hazards and causes; judging fire load, building construction; inspection techniques; storage of flammable and combustible liquids and hazardous materials security. This course is designed for career public safety officers and recruits. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the authority to inspect, responsibilities of the fire inspector, the types of organizational structures that may affect inspection activities and public education.
  2. List the steps involved to prepare for inspection and inspection procedures and the purpose of follow up inspections.
  3. List and explain the different types of occupancy classifications and the different components of the means of egress.
  4. List and describe the different types of fire protection systems, and list the components of an effective water distribution system.
 
 

FS107 REPORT WRITING FOR THE FIRE SERVICE

Credits: 3
Course Offering: Fire Academy
Prerequisite: Instructor approval

Emphasis on principle and techniques of report writing; methods of writing the basic who, what, when, where, why and how; and procedures of gathering information and developing various types of reports. Study is designed to produce proficiency in report writing and to reinforce and expand skills previously acquired.  
 
Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand the importance of accurate report writing and record keeping.
  2. Understand the standards and formats of basic fire service report forms.
  3. Properly complete required reports relative to fire and other emergency incidents.
  4. Develop administrative reports, memorandums, and correspondence related to the fire service organization.

Foodservice Management (FSM)

FSM100 INTRODUCTION TO THE FOODSERVICE PROFESSION

Credits: 2

This course provides an overview of the culinary profession, including standards and behaviors that are essential for success in this field. Topics include the history of culinary arts, orientation to career opportunities and pathways in culinary and foodservice industry, ethics, resume writing, interviewing skills, and networking. Sustainable practices in the foodservice industry are also covered.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the characteristics of professional standards in attitude, behavior, and attire within the culinary profession.
  2. Explore career opportunities available within the foodservice industry.
  3. Using ethical principles, led by example in personal and professional situations.
 
 

FSM110 PROFESSIONAL DINING ROOM SERVICE: THEORY

Credits: 2
Corequisite: FSM110L

This is the lecture portion of a two-part course. This portion introduces students to the principles of professional dining room service focusing on the practices of high-quality customer service, attributes of a professional server, the service process, and marketing a positive guest experience. Students must take this concurrently with FSM110L Professional Dining Room Service: Laboratory, unless already successfully completed. Successful completers have the opportunity to earn the National Restaurant Association Customer Service certification.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the characteristics of high-quality customer service.
  2. Explain the importance of server appearance in high-quality service.
  3. Create a formal customer service plan.
 
 

FSM110L PROFESSIONAL DINING ROOM SERVICE: LABORATORY

Credits: 1
Prerequisite: FSM110 or concurrently

This is the laboratory component of FSM110 theory course. This is a hands-on training that provides students with fundamental technical skills in professional table service. Students will be introduced to system, procedures, and techniques that enhance guest dining experience. Topics include techniques of suggestive selling, handling difficult and special situations, and the role of technology in the guest service process. Students must take this concurrently with FSM110 Professional Dining Room Service: Theory, unless already successfully completed. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Perform opening and closing duties following the restaurant standard operating procedures.
  2. Demonstrate the appropriate service sequence for the different types of service.
  3. Apply techniques in handling difficult and special situations in a restaurant setting.
  4. Perform cooperatively as a part of a service team.
 
 

FSM115 PURCHASING AND RECEIVING

Credits: 2

This course presents students with the concept of purchasing and practice of receiving in quality foodservice operations. Course objectives include: determining order quantities, writing effective purchase specifications, formal and informal price comparison, proper receiving, storage, product issue procedures, quality standards, regulations governing food products, purchasing ethics, and vendor relations. Formerly HFB215.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Develop product specifications for a variety of food products.
  2. Create standard operating procedures for purchasing and receiving.
  3. Analyze ethical concerns in purchase decision making.
 
 

FSM120 FOOD SAFETY AND SANITATION

Credits: 2

This course aims to develop student understanding of the principles of food safety and sanitation and apply them in foodservice operations. Topics include the study of foodborne illness, biological, chemical, and physical hazards, cross-contamination, the flow of food and HACCP (Hazards Analysis Critical Control Point) food safety program. The course prepares students for the National Restaurant Association ServSafe Food Protection Manager certification exam. Formerly CUL120.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply the basic principles of food safety.
  2. Practice good personal hygiene practices and personal appearance standards to daily life.
  3. Evaluate food safety and sanitation practices of a foodservice operation.
 
 

FSM130 PROFESSIONAL BAR AND ALCOHOL MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3

This course introduces students to the concepts of beverage management and alcohol service. Students will learn about bar management, controlling beverage costs, legal aspects of professional alcohol service, and marketing of alcohol beverage products. Furthermore, students will use the ServSafe Alcohol training modules to learn best practices for providing responsible alcohol service. Students will acquire an understanding of the criminal and civil liability relating to sale and service of alcohol. Through role play simulation, students will learn how to assess signs of intoxication, prevent guest intoxication, and deal with difficult situations while maintaining effective guest relations. Students’ knowledge will be assessed using the National Restaurant Association ServSafe® Alcohol Certification Exam. Formerly RES130 Professional Bar and Beverage Management.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. List beverage control procedures for receiving, storing, and issuing products.
  2. Explain the importance of providing responsible alcohol service.
  3. Implement proper procedures for dealing with non-compliant customers and intoxicated guests while maintaining effective guest relations.
 
 

FSM145 CULINARY MATH

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: Placement into MA110A or equivalent

This course develops student math skills needed in the culinary and foodservice industry, such as working with conversions of weights and measurements, calculating food cost, portion cost, menu price, revenue and expense, and analyzing profit and loss statement. Students will engage in drill and practice, problem solving exercises, and complete a semester-long course project. Formerly CUL145.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Convert different units of measurement for weights and volume for foodservice industry.
  2. Calculate food cost, portion cost, and menu price of various menu items.
  3. Analyze a profit and loss statement.
 
 

FSM154 FOODSERVICE NUTRITION

Credits: 3

This is an introductory study of the science and principles of nutrition as it applies to foodservice operation. Students will describe the characteristics, functions, and food sources of major nutrients and evaluate recipes and menus using dietary guideline recommendations, food guides, and food labels. Topics also include principles of nutrient needs throughout the life cycle and its application to menu planning and food preparation; and maximization of nutrient retention in food preparation and storage. Successful completers will have the opportunity to earn the National Restaurant Association Nutrition course certificate. Formerly HS154.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the characteristics and functions of each major nutrient.
  2. Evaluate recipes and menus using dietary guideline recommendations, food guides, and food labels.
  3. Analyze one’s own diet by applying nutritional principles and concepts.
  4. Create a one-week menu using the Food Exchange System.
 
 

FSM155 FOODSERVICE ACCOUNTING

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: FSM145

This course presents the basic financial accounting concepts as it applies to foodservice operations.  Students will learn about analyzing and interpreting financial statements, planning for a profitable foodservice operation, assessing operational performance, budgeting, and managing cash and accounts receivable. Successful completers have an opportunity to earn the National Restaurant Association course certificate.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Differentiate among types of accounts (assets, liabilities, equity, revenue, and expenses).
  2. Explain the importance of applying the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles in bookkeeping and accounting.
  3. Analyze profitability using financial statements such as an income statement and a balance sheet.
 
 

FSM222 FOODSERVICE COST

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: FSM145  
 
This course develops student understanding of basic technique and cost control procedures in purchasing, receiving, storing, issuing, and during food production. Topics include the importance of controlling cost in foodservice operations, forecasting and budgeting, controlling labor and other related costs. Students will engage in problem solving exercises and complete a semester-long course project. Successful completers have an opportunity to earn the National Restaurant Association course certificate. Formerly HS222.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify best practices in purchasing, receiving, storing, issuing, and food production procedures.
  2. Prepare food and labor cost budget.
  3. Explain the importance of cost control in foodservice operations.
 
 

FSM240 MENU PLANNING

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: FSM145  
 
In this course, students examine the principles of menu planning and menu design. Topics include costing, pricing, menu engineering, nutrition, and various types of menus for different types of operations, and strategies to market an operation. Students will engage in a semester- long project that will challenge them to plan a restaurant concept and appropriate menu.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Develop a menu following the principles of menu layout and design.
  2. Apply the seven principles of menu planning.
  3. Utilize menu engineering to analyze menus.
 
 

FSM254 FOODSERVICE MARKETING

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: FSM240

This course introduces the principles and concepts used in marketing a foodservice operation. Topics include the marketing process, the market environment and customer behavior, the communication channels used in marketing sales promotions, publicity and public relations, menu merchandising, and evaluating the marketing effort. Students will engage in a semester-long marketing project.  Successful completers have the opportunity to earn the National Restaurant Association course certificate.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain why effective marketing is essential for success in the restaurant and foodservice business. 
  2. Design sales promotions, publicity, and public relations activities for a foodservice operation.
  3. Prepare a marketing plan for a foodservice operation.
 
 

FSM269A LEADERSHIP IN FOODSERVICE OPERATIONS

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: EN110

This course aims at developing the student’s leadership skills and values essential in becoming an effective manager and a leader in the restaurant and foodservice industry. Using the DiSC online personality test, students will learn to analyze their own strengths and weaknesses and create an action plan to improve leadership skills. The coursework includes field research work designed to engage students with foodservice professionals. Successful course completers will obtain the National Restaurant Association ManageFirst course certificate, which signifies student achievement of course competencies.  Formerly RES269A Leadership in Restaurant and Foodservice Operation.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Analyze leadership strengths and weakness using the DiSC online personality test.
  2. Appraise ethical principles presented in course case studies.
  3. Create an action plan to improve leadership skills.
 
 

FSM269B LEADERSHIP SEMINAR PART I

Credits: 1
Corequisite: FSM269C


This course is a continuation of Leadership in Restaurant and Foodservice Operations designed to provide awareness of individual leadership styles. Through research, case studies, and guest speakers, students will learn the pros and cons of, examine behaviors associated with, and compare world leaders who exemplify each leadership style i.e. Transformational, Transactional, Servant, Commanding, Distributive, and Situational. Through this course, students will explore their own leadership style and identify leadership qualities they want to develop. Formerly RES269B.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify behaviors associated with different leadership styles.
  2. Identify leadership qualities students want to develop.
  3. Evaluate styles of leadership using an online leadership assessment tool.
 
 

FSM269C LEADERSHIP SEMINAR PART II

Credits: 1
Corequisite: FSM269B

Through participation in an experiential learning at an on- or off-campus organization, students apply leadership knowledge and skills learned and acquired in FSM269A and FSM269B. In collaboration with an organization advisor or supervisor, students will develop a project goal to which leadership skills, i.e. goal setting, decision making, motivating others, and delegating tasks will be applied and evaluate project and performance in collaboration with an organization advisor. Formerly RES269C.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Develop project goals in collaboration with an organization advisor.
  2. Apply leadership skills, i.e. goal setting, decision making, motivating others, and delegating tasks, in the execution of a project.
  3. Evaluate project and performance in collaboration with an organization advisor.
 
 

FSM270 RESTAURANT HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: EN110

This course introduces students to key functions of human resource management, which includes recruitment and selection of best employees; orientation and training to optimize performance; building effective teams; facilitating performance appraisal; developing productivity standards, professional development programs, benefits, and compensation structure; managing a safe workplace; and effective labor relations. Human resource management concepts and practices are learned through case studies, application exercises, and field project exercises. Successful course completers will obtain the National Restaurant Association ManageFirst® course certificate, which signifies student achievement of competencies. Formerly RES270.


Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Create a human resource management handbook.
  2. Evaluate good human resource management strategies.
  3. List key functions of human resource management.
 
 

FSM292 FOODSERVICE PRACTICUM

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: FSM269A 

This course will give students the opportunity to apply restaurant management principles acquired from the program. Students will assess restaurant operations policy and procedures for managing guest experience, cost, human resources, marketing, and make recommendations for improvement. Throughout the semester, students are required to meet regularly with the faculty mentor and maintain an electronic portfolio to document learning and complete the required Practicum evaluation forms. Formerly RES292 Restaurant and Foodservice Practicum.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply customer service principles in the execution of work.
  2. Assess restaurant operations policy and procedures.
  3. Create a portfolio following the NRA course portfolio development standards.
 
 

FSM299 FOODSERVICE MANAGEMENT CAPSTONE

Credits: 3
Corequisite: FSM292

This course provides an in-depth study of important management principles and procedures in foodservice operations which include customer service and menu management, product purchasing, receiving, storing, and issuing, quality food and beverage production management and control, human resource management, analysis and decision-making. Successful course completers have the opportunity to earn the National Restaurant Association course certificate.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain how enhancing quality should be the focus of an operation’s improvement philosophy.
  2. Compare standards of a foodservice operation against those outlined by the National Restaurant Association (NRA).
  3. Formulate a quality improvement plan for foodservice operation.

HI121 WORLD CIVILIZATION (PRE-HISTORIC TIME TO 1500)

Credits: 3

Students will explore the most important aspects of world civilizations from pre-historic time to 1500 A.D. from the Fertile Crescent to the medieval feudal states. Students will study the birth of ancient peoples and societies.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Develop an understanding of the basic principles and theories involved with world civilizations.
  2. Explain the development and evolution of ancient people and societies.
  3. Develop an appreciation of world civilizations from pre-historic to 1500 A.D. from the Fertile Crescent to the medieval feudal states.
 
 

HI122 WORLD CIVILIZATION (1500 TO PRESENT TIME)

Credits: 3

The course plots civilizations from the 1500’s to the modern era. Students will examine a variety of historic experiences, discoveries, and inventions as well as the cultural, political, and economic forces that have shaped modern society.
 
Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Develop an understanding of the basic principles and theories involved with world civilizations.
  2. Apply principles and theories to major events related to world civilizations.
  3. Develop an appreciation of world civilizations from the 1500’s to modern day period.
 
 

HI176 GUAM HISTORY

Credits: 3

Guam History covers the ancient settlement period prior to Ferdinand Magellan’s arrival in 1521 up to the modern United States military buildup on Guam. The Spanish, Japanese and United States administration periods and development of self-rule will be discussed and analyzed. This course is designed to inform those interested about the diverse influences that have contributed to the culture and history of Guam. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of Guam history.
  2. Respect CHamoru culture and values.
  3. Appreciate the qualities that make Guam unique.

Allied Health (HL)

HL120 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

Credits: 2

This course provides students with the elements of medical terminology. The study includes origins of medical terminology, the basic structure of medical words, word element combinations, medical terminology for specialties, and medical abbreviations. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

  1. Define 350 medical words and elements.
  2. Build and dissect medical terms from roots/suffixes to understand the word element combinations that create medical terminology.
  3. Define abbreviations and symbols.
 
 

HL130 FIRST AID & SAFETY

Credits: 1

This course provides students with the basic knowledge and skills necessary in an emergency to call for assistance and provide standard first aid care, including CPR. This course also includes information on the prevention of injury and illness with a focus on personal safety. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and skills of first aid and safety including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).
  2. Explain the Chain of Survival according to the American Red Cross.
 
 

HL131 BASIC LIFE SUPPORT FOR HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS

Credits: 1

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary in an emergency such as rescue breathing and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This course is a related technical requirement for the Certificate and Associate of Science in Medical Assisting. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate one- and two-person resuscitation of a simulated adult in cardiac arrest.
  2. Evaluate the effective use of ventilation when using a barrier device.
  3. Apply concepts to use an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) correctly.
 
 

HL135 HEARTSAVER FIRST AID CPR AED

Credits: 1

This course will provide students with the knowledge and skills to provide Basic First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) with an automated external defibrillator (AED).  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate how to perform Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) on an adult manikin.
  2. Practice effective use of an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) on an adult victim.
  3. Administer basic first aid techniques.
 
 

HL150 STUDY OF DISEASES

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: HL120

This course provides the basic concepts and characteristics of disease processes, which include disease description, etiology, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and prevention and terminology pertaining to injuries and disease process.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the etiology of commonly encountered diseases.
  2. Identify signs and symptoms of common diseases.
  3. Define basic medical terminology as related to diseases.
 
 

HL190 INTRODUCTION TO ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY FOR ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONAL 

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: EN110 placement orf equivalent

This course is designed to serve students in the Career Technical Programs. This course will be part of the Medical Assistant Program core curriculum. Material covered includes the structure and function of the human body. Basic chemistry and cell structures are covered, as well as the organization of tissues, organs, and organ systems. Correlations can then be made between this material and disease states commonly encountered in the practice of these fields. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the effects on cells placed in an isotonic solution, hypertonic solution, or a hypotonic solution.
  2. Differentiate between the effects of the sympathetic system and parasympathetic system on system organs.
  3. List the cellular components of blood and their functions.
 
 

HL201 MEDICAL LAW AND ETHICS

Credits: 3

Through this course, students are provided the opportunity to apply working knowledge of laws to the practice of Medical Assisting and related healthcare fields. Formerly MS201.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the difference between legal and ethical responsibilities in patient care and management.
  2. List the current patients’ rights according to the American Hospital Association (AHA).
  3. Evaluate the consequences of failing to adhere to medical law and ethics as related to the clinical medical office.
 
 

HL202 NUTRITION

Credits: 3

This course provides students with the basic knowledge of nutrition.  The knowledge from this course will allow students to understand the relationship between health and nutrition and how to make wise choices that contribute to a healthy lifestyle.  The course further discusses methods in optimizing the use of different food choices in reducing or avoiding health-related implications and/or illnesses.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the six functions of nutrients.
  2. Apply the food pyramid to effectively maintain a healthy lifestyle.
  3. Recommend a dietary meal plan that provides a corrective treatment to common illnesses.
 
 

HL252 PATHOLOGY FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONS

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: HL190

The objective of this course is for the students to gain an understanding of underlying principles, manifestations and clinical implications of disease processes and alterations of function in body systems in all age groups through clinical case study.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe type II hypersensitivity reaction, and how it induces hemolytic anemia. (Immunopathology)
  2. Describe the distribution of fluid between the intracellular and extracellular compartments. (fluid and hemodynamics)
  3. List common causes and discuss the pathogenesis of pneumonia. (respiratory pathology)

Human Services (HM)

HM110 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY SERVICES

Credits: 3

Students will become familiar with services available in the community to meet human needs and to help with social problems. Emphasis is on the development of knowledge from the perspective of a consumer and of skills necessary to locate, gain access to, and effectively utilize such services. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Recognize different ways of thinking about community.
  2. Explain basic concepts of individual and collective human needs.
  3. Define concepts and typologies of community services, particularly those on Guam.
 
 

HM150 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT DIVERSITY

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: SO130 
  
The course examines concepts and principles concerning human diversity. It sensitizes students to the complex social-economic-political issues diverging from human equality, conflict resolution, as well as examining the effects of social injustice toward persons of race, gender, sexual orientation and disability. Additionally, students are provided awareness of social change affecting the professional commitment to ensure nondiscriminatory treatment and equal access for clients at all levels of practice interventions. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Examine human development diversity as it relates to race, gender, sexual orientation and disability.
  2. Relate how issues of social change and advocacy promote human development diversity.
  3. Assess social progress and challenges in promoting fair and equitable treatment.
 
 

HM180 HUMAN SERVICES PRACTICUM ORIENTATION

Credits: 3

The course is designed as a “bridge course” to foster a learning environment that enables students to explore their career pathway in human services.  Students gain the knowledge of what to expect from a practicum experience and build awareness about the various human service practicum sites, services provided to clients, as well as meeting with practicum instructors. By the end of the course, students select the practicum site to conduct field practicum hours.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the practicum integrative processing model.
  2. Employ student values with career options when selecting a field practicum.
  3. Explain the relationship between student learner and field practicum agency.
 
 

HM201 SOCIAL WELFARE & DEVELOPMENT: GLOBAL CHALLENGES

Credits: 3

Students will critically examine social welfare from an international and cross-cultural perspective with a focus on the importance of cultural and value systems on a society's allocation of resources, on the development of informal and formal systems of care, and on the evolving mission, roles, and functions of social work.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of basic concepts of the structure and functions of social welfare.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of social work pertaining to human behavior and the social environment within a bio-psycho-social-spiritual framework.
  3. Demonstrate ways that global trends shape the future of social work and social work education.
 
 

HM205 FOUNDATIONS OF CASE MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: HM201  
  
The course examines strengths-based case management practice models, interpersonal skills to foster a client-driven culturally sensitive partnering approach to care, communication/interviewing skills, service delivery, service coordination planning and proper documentation in case management. Students will further recognize the role of case managers within human service agencies and informal support systems.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify case management principles, models and strategies for effective delivery of human services.
  2. Apply the basic skills of case management functions in service coordination.
  3. Contrast the different phases of the case management process with one another.
 
 

HM225 SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: HM110 and PY120

The course critically examines the field and practice of substance abuse prevention in human services.  Students will gain knowledge into the evidence-based, prevention research and programming, as well as facts about drugs and other prevention work such as community awareness, prevention education and evaluation.  Students will gain firsthand experience in learning about various community-based programs aimed at substance abuse prevention.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the three dominant theoretical orientations in substance abuse prevention.
  2. Articulate the science base prevention steps of substance abuse prevention programming.
  3. Compare the role of cultural competency, advocacy and ethics with science-based community prevention programming and education.
 
 

HM250 ETHICS AND VALUES IN HUMAN SERVICES

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: HM150, HM201

The course is designed to help students integrate values and ethics into all aspects of human services and ultimately the practice in the field of human services and its related services. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Recognize historically important traditions in ethics.
  2. Articulate the credibility of information sources.
  3. Distinguish the relationship between values and ethics in human services.
 
 

HM292 HUMAN SERVICES PRACTICUM

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: HM110, HM201

Students will have the opportunity to implement their knowledge and skills while working under the mentorship of a qualified social services professional and faculty member. A minimum of 135 hours of work is required, which may include observations, meetings with clients and professionals, and professional development activities.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs):

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate effective communication skills with clients and co-workers.
  2. Demonstrate appropriate competency needed in the effective delivery of human services.
  3. Demonstrate professionalism and ethical conduct within the field.

Hospitality (HS)

HS150 WELCOME TO HOSPITALITY

Credits: 3

This course provides an overview of the hospitality, travel and tourism industry.  Students will achieve an understanding of the concepts and facets of the hospitality and tourism and travel industry, interacting in the framework of product and service distribution systems. Students will learn, through career exploration, the importance of professionalism, guest relations, positive work habits, values, attitudes expected of hospitality employees, and career exploration.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the main components of the hospitality, tourism, and travel industry.
  2. Explain the importance of guest relation skills and a hospitality attitude.
  3. Discuss the history, organizational structures and contemporary issues in the hospitality and travel industries.
  4. Identify career opportunities in the hospitality, tourism, and travel industries.
 
 

HS152 CUSTOMER SERVICE

Credits: 3

This course is designed to examine, challenge, and refine the principles of guest service management in various service organizations. Students will gain an understanding of "service products" and apply the tools to deliver these services and use these concepts in their own work experiences. Included is the American Hotel and Lodging Association Educational Institute's Guest Service Gold® program designed to train employees to be guest service-oriented to provide memorable service. A Certified Guest Service Professional (CGSP) examination is offered to those seeking a CGSP designation.
 
Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Utilize data to assess the guests’ wants and needs.
  2. Apply the accepted protocol for resolving guest complaints.
  3. Design a customer service campaign that appeals to the wants and needs of a guest.
 
 

HS155 BASIC HOTEL & RESTAURANT ACCOUNTING

Credits: 3

This is an introductory course in basic hotel and restaurant accounting. Emphasis is placed on understanding and use of financial reports such as trial balance, income, and balance sheet statements. Topics such as the double entry system and types of inventory systems are included. Uniform systems of accounts for use in the lodging and restaurant industry is discussed.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Utilize the uniform systems of accounts to create a chart of accounts.
  2. Demonstrate accurate journaling with the double-entry system and analyze income and balance sheets.
  3. Summarize accounts and perform a trial balance in accordance with accounting standards.
 
 

HS157 TOURISM PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

Credits: 3 

This course provides an overview of the tourism industry and how its components-destination, marketing, demand, and travel, interact with each other in order to create a successful tourism product.  Students will learn principles of destination planning, development, and marketing and apply these principles in the study of Guam's tourism industry.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the importance of tourism in the economy.
  2. Discuss the components of a tourism system.
  3. Create a tourism marketing program for Guam.
 
 

HS158 INTRODUCTION TO MEETINGS, EXPOSITIONS, EVENTS, AND CONVENTIONS (MEEC)

Credits: 3

This course provides students with knowledge and abilities that prepare them to assist with or manage the implementation and monitoring of meeting, exposition, event, or convention (MEEC). Students will learn tasks, activities, and issues involved in producing a meeting or event. Course competencies are aligned to Meeting and Business Event Competency Standards (MBECS) – which are global, industry-endorsed descriptions of the knowledge and abilities that meeting professionals need in order to be successful.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the role and function of a meeting planner.
  2. Identify the legal and ethical responsibilities of a meeting planner.
  3. Create a project management plan for meeting, exhibition, event, and convention (MEEC).
 
 

HS160 HOSPITALITY SUPERVISION

Credits: 3 

This course provides hospitality students with proven ways to get maximum results by directing and leading. Students will learn to juggle the expectations of management, guests, employees, and governmental agencies. In addition, students will develop creative strategies for effectively managing change and resolve conflicts.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify fundamental supervisory responsibilities.
  2. Describe how supervisors work with the human resources department to recruit new employees.
  3. Distinguish coaching from counseling and disciplining.
  4. Describe issues supervisors should be aware of as they assume the role of team leader.
 
 

HS208 MANAGING FOOD & BEVERAGE SERVICE

Credits: 3

This course will give students a basic understanding of managing service in food and beverage operations.  The emphasis of this course is to explore aspects of food and beverage services common to restaurants, cafeterias, hotels, and conference centers and clubs. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and skills in providing various styles and specialized forms of service, and identify when these styles and forms of service can be applied, and develop an appropriate sequence of service for various food and beverage establishments.
  2. Describe a typical food and beverage. establishment's standard operating procedure.
  3. Identify causes, assess potential solutions, and formulate a plan of action to address all negative "moments of truth."
 
 

HS211 MANAGING FRONT OFFICE OPERATIONS

Credits: 3

Managing Front Office Operations provides an in-depth look at management of the front office and how this department interacts with other hotel departments to create a memorable guest experience. This course presents a systematic approach to front office procedures by detailing the flow of business through a hotel, from the reservations process to check-out and account settlement. It also examines the various elements of effective front office management, paying particular attention to the planning and evaluation of front office operations and to human resources management.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the importance of operating an efficient front office in view of overall hotel performance.
  2. Apply various front office skills in the four stages of the guest cycle.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of front office terminology and guest relations strategies when presented with various work situations.
 
 

HS215 MANAGING HOUSEKEEPING OPERATIONS

Credits: 3 

Housekeeping is critical to the success of today's hospitality operations. This course exemplifies what it takes to direct day-to-day operations of this department, from big-picture management issues to technical details for cleaning each area. This course provides students with an understanding of managing housekeeping operations and provides strategies and tools to achieve housekeeping standards that meet guest expectations.   

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe and distinguish the role of housekeeping in a hotel operation.
  2. Apply concepts of environmentally sound procedures for sustainable housekeeping.
  3. Summarize the routine of guest room cleaning from room assignments, through inspections, and turndown service.
 
 

HS216 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3 

This course is an introduction on managing the important human resources who provide services within a hospitality operation. Students will learn the latest strategies for attracting employees, minimizing turnover, and maximizing productivity. Topics include organizational culture and social responsibility issues, including what companies are doing (and not doing) right. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe employment laws, planning, and staffing.
  2. Explain human resources development activities such as staff orientation, socialization, training, and evaluation.
  3. Evaluate compensation and labor issues.
 
 

HS217 HOTEL SECURITY MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3

This course explains the issues surrounding the need for individualized hotel security programs, examines a wide variety of security and safety equipment and procedures, discusses guest protection and internal security for asset protection, explores risk management and loss prevention issues, and outlines OSHA regulations that apply to lodging properties.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the security and safety responsibilities of hotels.
  2. Explain the key issues in developing and setting up a hotel security program.
  3. Identify strategies for managing employee safety and demonstrate how a hotel can establish a safety committee.
 
 

HS254 HOSPITALITY AND TRAVEL MARKETING

Credits: 3  
  
This course examines the hospitality and travel marketing system. Students will learn the different types and roles of hospitality and travel industry organizations, how marketing applies to different travel components and various departments of a hospitality organization. Topics such as core principles of marketing, marketing approaches, strategic and tactical marketing, marketing research and analysis, marketing strategy, marketing plan development, and methods to effectively implement and control as well as evaluate the marketing plan will be covered.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the core principles of marketing and their application to the Hospitality and Travel components of the tourism industry.
  2. Conduct marketing research by developing a survey relevant to the chosen topic.
  3. Create and present a Marketing Plan of their choice.
 
 

HS255 AIRLINE MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3 

This course provides an understanding of the underlying marketing, operational and financial
priorities that influence airline viability. Through project-based learning, students will analyze marketing and operation strategies employed by airline companies and how these strategies impact passenger service.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain business and marketing strategies used by airline companies.
  2. Compare and contrast customers in the business air travel and leisure travel market.
  3. Analyze operation strategies employed by airline companies.
 
 

HS257 PRINCIPLES OF TOUR GUIDING

Credits: 3

This course prepares students to become professional tour guides. Students will learn the principles of tour guiding and knowledge about Guam's history and culture. Students will visit Guam's historic and scenic sites and perform the role of tour guides.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Manage tour groups and keep them safe.
  2. Explain the importance of customer service.
  3. Apply public speaking techniques to describe historic and scenic sites.
 
 

HS265 ECO TOURISM

Credits: 3

Ecotourism is a high-yield category in the tourism industry and a form of tourism that fosters learning and appreciation of the natural environment. This course focuses on best practices for planning and strategic management of ecotourism venues and discussion of the role of local and indigenous communities in ecotourism management.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the value of ecotourism as an environmentally-focused, responsible and high-yield category of tourism.
  2. Identify the role of local and indigenous communities in ecotourism management.
  3. List the best practices for planning and strategic management of ecotourism venues.
 
 

HS266 INTERNATIONAL HOTELS: DEVELOPMENT AND MANAGEMENT

Credits: 3
 
This course prepares students for leadership roles in tomorrow’s worldwide lodging industry. Future international hotel managers will need a fuller understanding and deeper appreciation of management and marketing applications within a globalized context. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the phases of hotel development and the criteria for selecting a location for an international hotel.
  2. Explain the qualities required for a manager in an international hotel and the importance of understanding cultural diversity.
  3. Cite the future growth of international hotels in the era of globalization.
 
 

HS268 MANAGING TECHNOLOGY IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY

Credits: 3 

This course is an overview of the information needs of lodging properties. It will cover basics of purchasing, implementing, maintaining, and managing a variety of technology systems used in hospitality and security precautions needed.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify common technology systems used in hospitality operations.
  2. Describe the elements of a room’s management module.
  3. Define various threats to technology systems and the security precautions needed.
 
 

HS292 HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM PRACTICUM

Credits: 1-6 
  
This course provides students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills via on-the-job training in the hospitality and tourism industry.
   
Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply appropriate management styles in the workplace.
  2. Exercise the importance of customer service in the hospitality and tourism industry.
  3. Demonstrate desirable workplace behaviors such as punctuality, communications, and proper appearance.

Humanities (HU)

HU120 PAIFIC CULTURES

Credits: 3    

Pacific Cultures takes a look at the exploration of the Pacific peoples and their diverse cultural and biological heritages. The course provides a comprehensive survey about Pacific Island cultures. The course further examines the first migrations of indigenous navigators through the age of European exploration and colonialism, as well as exploring the unique cultural configurations of ritual practice, cosmology, and society. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the culture, economy, and politics of the island nations and territories.
  2. Compare and contrast various Pacific Island cultures.
  3. Explain relevant sociological concepts as it applies to decolonization efforts to transform Pacific Island regional development and modernization.
 
 

HU220 GUAM CULTURES & LEGENDS

Credits: 3    

This course covers Guam’s cultural development and conflicts. Cultural environments both past and present are explored. Emphasis is made on the study of CHamoru culture through folklore. Students will learn the effect of , cultural interchange that will enable them to answer specific questions from visitors with a more accurate and deeper explanation.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Develop an understanding of the basic principles and theories of the origin of the CHamoru people and their culture.
  2. Develop a deeper understanding and appreciation of the CHamoru people and their culture.

Interpreting (IN)

IN145 VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: ASL110
 
This course provides students with information and instruction to develop skills aimed at increasing vocabulary and word choice repertoire for effective interpreting.  This course will also include the study of how language is culturally based, the effects of culture on intercultural communication and possible cultural conflicts. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate critical thinking and appropriate responses in any social context using local, national and global vocabulary skills.
  2. Improve and expand vocabulary in ASL conversation to include the use of idioms, common expressions, and other figures of speech.
  3. Develop strategies and word choice repertoire to facilitate effective interpreting.
 
 

IN170 INTRODUCTION TO INTERPRETING

Credits: 3

This course addresses basic theory and practice of interpretation in a variety of settings.  Students will be introduced to the communication process as a whole and the way messages are constructed. Information on linguistic register, cultural characteristics, ethics and professional conduct, and the modes of interpreting will be explained and discussed. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the different types of registry and modes of interpreting.
  2. Identify settings for interpreting and demonstrate appropriate skills needed to facilitate communication.
  3. Adhere to a set of values or code of ethics established for interpreting.
 
 

IN180 ECOLOGY OF DEAFNESS

Credits: 3 
Course Offering: Fall

This course will expand the student's knowledge of the impact of deafness on language and cognitive development and the socialization of Deaf individuals in a hearing world. Students will also be acquainted with characteristics of Deaf culture.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

  1. Identify the parts and function of the ear and be able to decipher an audiogram.
  2. Explain the difference between "DEAF" and "deaf" persons.
  3. Explain cognitive development as it relates to typical language development.
 
 

IN220 VOICE TO SIGN INTERPRETING

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: ASL100, IN170


The course will acquaint students with a basic understanding of what interpreting entails. This course focuses on building expressive interpreting skills such as assisting students in developing voice to sign interpreting skills and strengthening processing skills. Theoretical components and principles are also covered, including strategies for effective receptive listening. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Interpret spoken English into American Sign Language.
  2. Demonstrate skills necessary for both consecutive and simultaneous interpretation.
  3. Explain the dynamics of voice to sign language interpreting.
  4. Demonstrate beginning proficiency skills as a sign language interpreter of the Deaf Community.
 
 

IN292 SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETING PRACTICUM

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: IN220

This course is designed to expose ASL students to real-world interpreting experiences under the supervision of a professional in the field or related field who will serve as their mentor. This course focuses on the challenges and benefits of working in various settings (educational, medical, community & legal), following a code of ethics, and decision-making skills. Students will be expected to exhibit ethical conduct and characteristics of a professional interpreter while at all practicum placement sites and assignments related to practicum.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Conduct accurate interpreting services (voice to sign and sign to voice) within a cross-cultural context.
  2. Apply professional interpreting work ethics at entry-level proficiency in a real world setting.
  3. Reflect on the practicum experience to include identification of strengths, weaknesses, and ways to improve interpreting work.

Japanese Language (JA)

JA110 JAPANESE I 

Credits: 4

This course gives students basic Japanese language skills needed in real-life situations for varying communicative purposes. Language activities provide practice in listening, speaking, reading and writing, and reinforce vocabulary, grammar and language functions.  Students learn to read and write Hiragana, and to identify Katakana and select Kanji characters. Cultural aspects of Japan are also discussed to better understand the target language.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Comprehend simple spoken conversations.
  2. Communicate orally in a limited variety of everyday situations using basic Japanese.
  3. Comprehend short, simple sentences written in Japanese.
  4. Identify and write Hiragana, and identify Katakana and 24 Kanji characters.
 
 

JA111 JAPANESE II

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: JA110

A continuation of Japanese I I, this course provides learners with language necessary for meaningful communicative interaction.  Language functions and structures are practiced and applied to real-life situations through role-play, and pair/group tasks, and with a variety of audio, visual and computer activities. Listening and speaking skills are emphasized, with further practice in the reading of Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji. Cultural aspects of Japan are also discussed to better understand the target language.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Comprehend additional simple spoken conversations.
  2. Communicate orally in a variety of everyday situations using basic Japanese.
  3. Comprehend additional short, simple sentences written in Japanese.
  4. Identify and write Hiragana and Katakana, and identify an additional 75 Kanji characters.

Korean Language (KE)

KE110 KOREAN I

Credits: 4    

This course is an introductory course in the Korean language. Students will develop language skills in pronunciation, basic grammar, reading, and writing. Students will learn grammatical structures and vocabulary that are necessary for basic conversation, developing both a solid foundation in the Korean language and insights about the culture. Formerly titled Beginning Korean I. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Exhibit basic understanding of Korean culture and social norms.
  2. Comprehend simple Korean language sentences and be able to answer appropriately in the correct contexts.
  3. Converse in Korean using culturally acceptable expressions. 
 
 

KE111 KOREAN II

Credits: 4

This course will enable learners to achieve the intermediate level of speaking, listening, reading, writing and utilizing grammar skills in Korean. Students will also learn the context of various aspects of Korean culture and society. Formerly titled Intermediate Korean. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Exhibit advanced understanding of Korean culture and social norms.
  2. Comprehend advanced Korean language sentences and be able to answer appropriately in the correct contexts.
  3. Acquire test-taking skills necessary for taking the Test of Proficiency in Korean (TOPIK).

Mathematics (MA)

AEMA050 ALGEBRA I

Credits: 3

This course is the first of three general mathematics courses designed to prepare students for college level mathematics courses or to have basic mathematical skills to succeed in the workplace. The Adult High School mathematics courses follow the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS) for Adult Education. The three shifts by CCRS (focus, coherence, and rigor) ensures that students understand and apply mathematical ideas.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Interpret the structure of expressions. (A.SSE.1)
  2. Write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems. (A.SSE.3)
  3. Perform arithmetic operations on polynomials. (A.APR.1)
  4. Create equations that describe numbers or relationships. (A.CED.1)
  5. Solve equations as a process of reasoning. (A.REI.1)
 
 

AEMA060 GEOMETRY

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: AEMA050

As one of the three mathematics courses, AEMA60 Geometry is designed to prepare students for college level mathematics courses or to have basic mathematical skills to succeed in the workplace. Topics include Expressing Geometric Properties with Equations, Congruence, Similarity, Right Triangles, Geometric Measurement and Dimension and Circles.  The Adult High School mathematics courses follow the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS) for Adult Education. The three shifts by CCRS (focus, coherence, and rigor) ensures that students understand and apply mathematical ideas.  

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Experiment with transformations in the plane and develop definitions of rotations, reflections, and translations in terms of angles, circles, perpendicular lines, parallel lines, and line segments. (G.CO.1)
  2. Make formal geometric constructions such as copying and bisecting a segment, copying and bisecting an angle, constructing perpendicular lines, including the perpendicular bisector of a line segment with a variety of tools and methods. (G.SRT.5)
  3. Prove geometric theorems, theorems involving similarity and applying these theorems   to solve problems. (G.MG.2)
 
 

AEMA070 ALGEBRA II

Credits: 3
Prerequisite: “C” or better in AEMA050

This is a continuation of the AEMA 50 Algebra 1.  Topics include: Linear Equations, Linear Functions and their Graphs, Quadratic Functions, Exponential and Logarithmic Functions, Polynomials and Polynomial Functions, Radicals and Radical Functions, Rational Functions, Systems of Linear Equations, and Arithmetic and Geometric Sequences.
This course is the third of three general mathematics courses designed to prepare students for college-level mathematics courses or to have basic mathematical skills to succeed in the workplace. The Adult High School mathematics courses follow the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS) for Adult Education. The three shifts by CCRS (focus, coherence, and rigor) ensures that students understand and apply mathematical ideas.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Create equations that describe numbers or relationships. (A.CED.1)
  2. Solve equations as a process of reasoning. (A.REI.1)
  3. Interpret functions. (F.IF.1)
  4. Build functions. (F.BF.1)
  5. Interpret categorical and quantitative data. (S.ID.1)
 
 

MA052 GENERAL MATHEMATICS

Credits: 3

This course is designed to be an overview of basic mathematical operations and concepts, measurements and converting units of measurement, ratios and proportions, basics of statistical graphs, and basic algebraic concepts. 

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Perform basic operations involving whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and percents.
  2. Solve ratios and proportion problems.
  3. Perform basic operations involving measurements, including converting units of measurement.
  4. Summarize basic statistical tables, graphs, and charts.
  5. Apply basic algebraic concepts.
 
 

MA065 ADULT MATHEMATICS

Credits: 3

This course is designed to be an overview of several basic mathematical operations and concepts involving Real Numbers, Order of Operation, Basic Algebra, Measurement, Word Problems, Basic Statistics, Geometry, and Graphing. This course prepares students for General Education Development Testing Program (G.E.D) and the further learning of Algebra.  Course offering:  As needed.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Perform basic operation involving whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and percents.
  2. Solve ratios, rates, and proportion problems.
  3. Perform conversions among Units of Measure.
  4. Understand basic statistical terms, tables, and charts.
  5. Learn and apply basic algebraic concepts.
 
 

MA094 MATHEMATICS FOR THE TRADES

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: Placement into MA097 or higher

This course is designed for students seeking a certificate in technical and occupational areas. The focus is on fundamental concepts of Arithmetic, Algebra, and Geometry supported with practical applications in a variety of technical and career vocations, included but not limited to automotive, allied health, and construction trades. The course helps students to master the needed on-the-job math skills by using a wide variety of real-world problems and situations. Formerly MA107.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOS)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Perform mathematical computations using basic arithmetic operations, ratios, and percentages accurately.
  2. Apply measurements using both US and Metric Systems.
  3. Solve application problems using algebraic and geometric skills.
  4. Read and interpret information from basic statistical graphs.
 
 

MA096 PRE-COLLEGIATE MATHEMATICS

Credits: 6

MA096 is a comprehensive lecture course that is designed for students to complete all developmental math requirements in one semester. Successful students will acquire the skills needed for a college-level mathematics course. Upon successful completion of this course, students may register for the credited math courses.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Compute operations with whole numbers, decimals, fractions, proportions and percentages.
  2. Solve applications and conversions with unit measurements.
  3. Calculate basic descriptive statistics and applications involving basic geometry.
  4. Solve equations and inequalities with real numbers.
  5. Graph a linear equation and a linear inequality.
 
 

MA097 PRE-ALGEBRA

Credits: 4

MA 097 Pre-Algebra is the first level in a fundamental mathematics course. This is a course designed for students to acquire the basic algebraic skills needed for an intermediate algebra level mathematics course. This course may be conducted either at an accelerated pace for half a semester or traditional pace for a full semester. Classroom instruction is comprised of one or more of the following: accelerated, modular and mastery instructional strategies, computer-assisted learning, active learning, non-traditional learning strategies and/or traditional lecture-based strategies. Upon successful completion of this course, students may register for MA098.

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Compute operations with whole numbers, decimals, fractions, proportions and percentages.
  2. Solve applications and conversions with unit measurements.
  3. Calculate basic descriptive statistics and applications involving basic geometry.
  4. Simplify expressions and solve equations and inequalities with real numbers.
  5. Graph a linear equation and a linear inequality.
 
 

MA098 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA

Credits: 4
Prerequisite: MA097 or placement

MA 098 Intermediate Algebra is the second level in a fundamental mathematics course. This is a course designed for students to acquire the fundamental algebraic skills needed for a college-level mathematics course. This course may be conducted either at an accelerated pace for half a semester or traditional pace for a full semester. Classroom instructi